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*bear with me* 

1. LADY IN THE WATER (2006) *Score: 3/10* 

Starring: Paul Giamatti, Bryce Dallas Howard, Jeffrey Wright, Bob Balaban, Sarita Choudhury, Cindy Cheung, M. Night Shyamalan, Freddy Rodriguez, Bill Irwin, Mary Beth Hurt. 

I had zero clue what this was about going into it, and it was probably one of the most boring movies I've ever seen. Sorry. I really did not enjoy this. But hey, at least Shyamalan made a movie that was somewhat unique. I always like to give points for creativity/originality. I really like Bob Balaban as an actor though, so that was a highlight for me. 

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2. THE MONUMENTS MEN (2014) *Score: 7/10*

Starring: George Clooney, Matt Damon, John Goodman, Bill Murray, Bob Balaban, Hugh Bonneville, Jean Dujardin, Cate Blanchett. 

First off, what a great cast. I enjoyed this one because I am always interested in learning more about historical events. I thought the whole cast worked very well with each other, and the pacing of the film was very good. I have come to realize that Cate Blanchett continues to amaze me in every role I see her play. 

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3. GRETA (2018) *Score: 4/10* 

Starring: Chloe Grace Moretz, Isabelle Huppert, Maika Monroe, Colm Feore, Stephen Rea, Zawe Ashton. 

This one surrounds a young college student who returns a woman's misplaced handbag; this results in the two of them becoming friends and as they begin spending a lot of time with each other, the young woman starts to realize how unhinged her newfound friend is. It all spirals downward from there. This one surprised me for sure; it was better than I thought it would be. I won't be adding it to my collection though. It was definitely lacking the plot department. 

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4. I AM MOTHER (2019) *Score: 4/10* 

Starring: Hilary Swank, Rose Byrne, Clara Rugaard. 

After super advanced robots have nearly eradicated the human race and taken over the world, one of them sets up residence in a former laboratory and raises a human girl as her own "daughter." As Daughter reaches her teenage years, a strange woman arrives at the entrance of their fortress, and Daughter starts to wonder whether "Mother" really has the best intentions after all. 

Image result for i am mother 2019

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1. A KIND OF MURDER (2016) *Score: 3/10* 

Starring: Patrick Wilson, Jessica Biel, Haley Bennett. 

A well-to-do man is accused of murdering his wife blah blah blah... I did not care about anything that happened in this movie to be honest. I must confess that I didn't actually have my eyes glued to the screen for this film's entirety. That's how not into it I was. I kept hoping it would improve, but alas, it did not. 

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2. MURDER MYSTERY (2019) *Score: 6/10* 

Starring: Adam Sandler, Jennifer Aniston, Gemma Arterton, Luke Evans, Terence Stamp, David Walliams, Adeel Akhtar, Dany Boon, John Kani, Luis Gerardo Mendez. 

This Netflix "murder mystery" was actually quite pleasant, and I know why: Adam Sandler didn't do that stupid childish voice of his that he does in a lot of his movies. This wasn't exactly Agatha Christie caliber, but it was entertaining enough. 

Image result for murder mystery 2019

3. THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 2 (2019) *Score: 5.5/10* 

Starring: Patton Oswalt, Eric Stonestreet, Kevin Hart, Jenny Slate, Ellie Kemper, Lake Bell, Dana Carvey, Hannibal Buress, Tiffany Haddish, Bobby Moynihan, Nick Kroll, Pete Holmes, Harrison Ford, Sean Giambrone, Tara Strong, Laraine Newman. 

When I saw this in theaters, I had no idea how many funny people were in this cast... Anyway, this is a followup to the first movie that was released a couple years ago. One thing I have to say is that the pacing seemed to be a lot better in this one than its predecessor. Although, as far as Illumination films go, this isn't my favorite. I like the first Despicable Me movie the best. 

Image result for secret life of pets 2

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28 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

2. THE MONUMENTS MEN (2014) *Score: 7/10*

Starring: George Clooney, Matt Damon, John Goodman, Bill Murray, Bob Balaban, Hugh Bonneville, Jean Dujardin, Cate Blanchett. 

First off, what a great cast. I enjoyed this one because I am always interested in learning more about historical events.

I liked this one, too  I think it got a bum rap when it came out.  It's got a good cast and tells an interesting story that some may not have known about WWII.  

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3 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Oh, how I hated that movie. I rarely feel outright hostility about a film, but that one earned it.

Thank you, Lawrence, for the validation lol. I kept hoping it would get better, but it just seemed pretentious to me. 

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I enjoyed a Tab Hunter triple feature last night. Tab Hunter Confidential is an outstanding documentary that traces the life and career of a very interesting man. Eddie Muller's intros and outros with Allan Glaser, Tab's partner of many years, were quite informative.

Gunman's Walk is a solid three stars out of four western. I'd love for TCM to highlight the Fifties Western one month, and this would be one of the films to choose. Tab Hunter loved working with Van Heflin, who plays his father; Allan Glaser discussed this at some length. Hunter gives a strong performance as the deranged son who tries to live up to and exceed his father's image. James Darren as the sensitive younger brother plays the part Hunter would have played a few years earlier.

That Kind of Woman has already been discussed a little. Glaser said this was Hunter's favorite film, and that Sophia Loren was his favorite co-star, even though she and Sidney Lumet blamed him for the box office failure of the film. Glaser noted that it was unfortunate that the film was debuted at Radio City Music Hall instead of being treated as the arthouse film Lumet and cinematographer Boris Kaufman tried to make. Frankly, if you are going to try your hand at Italian Neo-Realism, a remake and updating of The Shopworn Angel isn't the best vehicle. That, I think, is the real problem. A romance with Hunter and Loren needs color; a drabber black-and-white film doesn't need stars like these two.

"You don't meet a girl like that every day," Tab says. No, you don't, when the girl is Sophia Loren. The story has some problems with credibility, but all six of the featured actors are quite good. Hunter conveys the sweetness and innocence, and also the inner strength, of the young paratrooper, and actually creates a more complex character than James Stewart in The Shopworn Angel. Loren also does her considerable best with that old cliche, the kept woman with a heart of gold. She and Hunter have chemistry, too. George Sanders, though effectively cast, seems a little weary; he's good, but he is even better elsewhere (Walter Pidgeon is better in the same role in the earlier film, and actually much more sympathetic than Jimmy Stewart). I've always been a fan of Keenan Wynn, who knows how to be weak and sleazy yet still be somewhat likeable. Jack Warden as Hunter's buddy is terrific. He rarely had this much screen time, and he knows just what to do with it. Barbara Nichols has the kind of voice that usually drives me batty, but she brings believability and conviction to a role that probably shouldn't work at all.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Lady in the Water

Oh, how I hated that movie. I rarely feel outright hostility about a film, but that one earned it.

You can tell when Shyamalan is WRI-ting! a unique concept idea he had, when the idea starts taking over any sense of realistic plotting or real-world plausibility--

When I pointed out that Giamatti's average-guy character in the script is named "Cleveland Heep" (yes), a friend joked "Well, it's nice to see that Uriah managed to marry and have descendants after all..."  😁

(Unfortunately, it was this movie--plus the tie-in children's-book-within-the-book, AND the genius-director autobiography he published alongside it--that WROTE! Shyamalan out of his contract with Disney.)

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5 hours ago, kingrat said:

Gunman's Walk is a solid three stars out of four western. I'd love for TCM to highlight the Fifties Western one month, and this would be one of the films to choose. Tab Hunter loved working with Van Heflin, who plays his father; Allan Glaser discussed this at some length. Hunter gives a strong performance as the deranged son who tries to live up to and exceed his father's image. James Darren as the sensitive younger brother plays the part Hunter would have played a few years earlier.

I'd never seen this one before I'd give it maybe 2.5 out of 4 stars.

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7 hours ago, kingrat said:

I enjoyed a Tab Hunter triple feature last night. Tab Hunter Confidential is an outstanding documentary that traces the life and career of a very interesting man. Eddie Muller's intros and outros with Allan Glaser, Tab's partner of many years, were quite informative.

Gunman's Walk is a solid three stars out of four western. I'd love for TCM to highlight the Fifties Western one month, and this would be one of the films to choose. Tab Hunter loved working with Van Heflin, who plays his father; Allan Glaser discussed this at some length. Hunter gives a strong performance as the deranged son who tries to live up to and exceed his father's image. James Darren as the sensitive younger brother plays the part Hunter would have played a few years earlier.

That Kind of Woman has already been discussed a little. Glaser said this was Hunter's favorite film, and that Sophia Loren was his favorite co-star, even though she and Sidney Lumet blamed him for the box office failure of the film. Glaser noted that it was unfortunate that the film was debuted at Radio City Music Hall instead of being treated as the arthouse film Lumet and cinematographer Boris Kaufman tried to make. Frankly, if you are going to try your hand at Italian Neo-Realism, a remake and updating of The Shopworn Angel isn't the best vehicle. That, I think, is the real problem. A romance with Hunter and Loren needs color; a drabber black-and-white film doesn't need stars like these two.

"You don't meet a girl like that every day," Tab says. No, you don't, when the girl is Sophia Loren. The story has some problems with credibility, but all six of the featured actors are quite good. Hunter conveys the sweetness and innocence, and also the inner strength, of the young paratrooper, and actually creates a more complex character than James Stewart in The Shopworn Angel. Loren also does her considerable best with that old cliche, the kept woman with a heart of gold. She and Hunter have chemistry, too. George Sanders, though effectively cast, seems a little weary; he's good, but he is even better elsewhere (Walter Pidgeon is better in the same role in the earlier film, and actually much more sympathetic than Jimmy Stewart). I've always been a fan of Keenan Wynn, who knows how to be weak and sleazy yet still be somewhat likeable. Jack Warden as Hunter's buddy is terrific. He rarely had this much screen time, and he knows just what to do with it. Barbara Nichols has the kind of voice that usually drives me batty, but she brings believability and conviction to a role that probably shouldn't work at all.

It was a terrific evening on TCM - the documentary and the two features.

I am glad that I finally saw "That Kind Of Woman" - but it's a film that strains credibility to the breaking point.

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"Above and  Beyond" - Melvin Frank - 1952 -

starring Robert Taylor and Eleanor Parker -

I was deeply offended by this movie -

the story of the man who dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima -

is reduced to a story of marital strife -

he is always on some sort of secret mission -

and spends little time with his wife and children -

she's unhappy and discontented -

and almost walks out on him -

finally, the big day arrives - the dropping of the bomb  -

God forgive me, but it is treated in a basically celebratory manner -

he rushes home -

into her loving arms -

THEY KISS -

and then walk off -

did anybody realize how offensive this material would become? - 

 Above-and-Beyond-1952-3.jpg  

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So I guess TCM UNDERGROUND was set to repeat the duo of FINAL EXAM and ANOTHER SON OF SAM, only to find out that the rights to FINAL EXAM have been "snapped up" by AMAZON PRIME (that's a buck o five they're not getting back.)

In its place was a film I have never heard of- ALONE IN THE DARK from 1982 (not to be confused with the video game or the UWE BOLL 2005 film that routinely makes "worst movies of all time lists.")

it was a surprisingly strong movie, undone only by a weak ending and a METICULOUSLY CULTIVATED third-act twist that STEVIE WONDER could see coming from 120 miles off...two things I have to note:

1. It was very well shot and lit

and

2. the acting was uniformly, and surprisingly, excellent....

DONALD PLEASANCE, JACK PALANCE, and MARTIN LANDAU (two of whom would win Oscars in the following decade) costar with DWIGHT SCHULTZ (aka MURDOCK from THE A-TEAM) in this story of four COMPLETE MANIACS who escape from the chillest Psyche Ward in history during a blackout in a bedroom community in New Jersey.

a HIGHLIGHT IS WHEN Punk Band THE SICK ****S appear and perform CHOP, CHOP, CHOP UP YOUR MOTHER at a local club.

PALANCE in particular was quite good- I'm guessing the director really came off as knowing what he was doing, because both he and PLEASANCE actually act, as opposed to setting the cruise control as they often did during this period in their careers. Sadly, they and LANDAU disappear for a large chunk of the movie.

still kind of worth seeing; and notable for a scene wherein one of the escaped killers WEARS A HOCKEY MASK (this came out the same year as FRIDAY THE 13TH PART 3 which is, as some of you know, the first time JASON wore his now iconic HOCKEY MASK.)

 

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23 minutes ago, Fedya said:

I'm sure people like Charlton Heston who would have been sent to their deaths in the invasion of the Home Islands weren't offended.

Yeah, it must've also been rough for them to deal with the innumerable subsequent Major Studio films that reduced and belittled their suffering and humanity and turned their deaths into a mere plotpoint for American Entertainment.

such as, um....

....

....

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19 hours ago, Peebs said:

 

Hoganman1:  Have you read "i'll Be Gone in the Dark" by Michelle McNamara?  It's one of those books you can't put down.  It's about the Golden State Killer.  The writer passed away before she finished the book and before they caught the killer.  Patton Oswalt was her husband and he and others helped piece together her notes to finish and promote the book.  I imagine it'll get made in to a movie or mini-series. 

 

No, I haven't read it, but it sounds like something I would find interesting. I'm a big fan of serial killer stories where the police, journalists or even private citizens become obsessed with trying to solve the crimes. I'll look for the book.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

In its place was a film I have never heard of- ALONE IN THE DARK from 1982 

Alone in the Dark has played on TCM Underground before. TCM has shown it at least 3 other times prior to this month. I saw it when it was new, and enjoyed it quite a bit.

It was co-written by Michael Harpster, Robert Shaye, and Jack Sholder. Shaye was the founder of New Line Cinema, who released this movie. Jack Sholder was also the director of the film. I had high hopes for Sholder, who next directed A Nightmare on Elm Street 2: Freddy's Revenge in all of its awkward glory. Then he later made the superior B-movie The Hidden (1987). Unfortunately, that was Sholder's peak, and while he's continued to work, nothing was as memorable as Alone in the Dark and The Hidden.

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The Adventures of Robin Hood

Now as I understood it, Basil Rathbone was a master fence man. He is the one that taught Errol Flynn in sword fighting, not to mention Ty Power in the Zorro flick. Am I wrong here? 

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5 hours ago, rayban said:

I enjoyed a Tab Hunter triple feature last night. Tab Hunter Confidential is an outstanding documentary that traces the life and career of a very interesting man. Eddie Muller's intros and outros with Allan Glaser, Tab's partner of many years, were quite informative.

I enjoyed the Tab Hunter documentary, too.  I found it especially interesting that after leaving Warner's not only did his career suffer but the tabloids felt that he was an open target for rumors.  He didn't have the studio behind him to protect his public image.

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53 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

The Adventures of Robin Hood

Now as I understood it, Basil Rathbone was a master fence man. He is the one that taught Errol Flynn in sword fighting, not to mention Ty Power in the Zorro flick. Am I wrong here? 

When it comes to old Hollywood, who knows? I say you just “LIBERTY VALANCE” it and print the legend.

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