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43 minutes ago, rosebette said:

Perhaps Roberts  hoped for the success that James Garner had when he broke with Warner Brothers after Maverick and began making films.  But Pernell Roberts is no James Garner!  

It's fairly well known that Pernell Roberts was a civil rights activist and had a lot of displeasure with the way Native Americans and other minorities were portrayed on the show. He also had a more ambitious viewpoint on where his character and the storylines should go. Pernell was simply a person who was way ahead of his time.

He was always my favorite on the show, even though they were all very talented, but his superiority never really stood out until he left.

Pernell worked in other phases of show business but he didn't come back until "Trapper John MD" in the late seventies to television stardom. 

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Star Trek - Season One (1966-1967)

captainkirk.jpg

I've seen these a half dozen or more times over the years, but I wanted to watch the Blu ray set. 

Source: CBS/Paramount Blu ray

***********

Now on to the movies of 1967, finally.

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2 hours ago, rosebette said:

Perhaps Roberts  hoped for the success that James Garner had when he broke with Warner Brothers after Maverick and began making films.  But Pernell Roberts is no James Garner!  

Edd Byrnes - Kookie - had the same wish list. He hounded Jack Warner to release him from his contract so he could be a movie star! Pernell Roberts hounded producer Dortort in the same manner, Pernell had a contract with NBC, but he was constantly trying to get out of it. "I AM an ACTOR." he would say. The boys had to make appearances, which Pernell hated. But you know what? You sign a contract. You need to live up to it. 

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11 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Star Trek - Season One (1966-1967)

captainkirk.jpg

I've seen these a half dozen or more times over the years, but I wanted to watch the Blu ray set. 

Source: CBS/Paramount Blu ray

***********

Now on to the movies of 1967, finally.

You know, i met Shatner, I bought his book and had him sign it. I was all agog. I thanked him and he said, "Thank you,"

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31 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Star Trek - Season One (1966-1967)

I've seen these a half dozen or more times over the years, but I wanted to watch the Blu ray set. 

Not sure if it still works (think it's since been shut down), but when I watched the ST:S1 Remastered set back when it was one of the first things you COULD watch on Blu-ray, studios were still trying to get a handle on this new Internet-connected "BD-Live" thingy that they were selling the players with before completely figuring out:

Disney thought it was going to be a MySpace page with home shopping, Universal used it to rotate new trailers into old disks, and Warner had a good idea to have live commentary chats, and keep them as permanently downloadable options...But Paramount had the neat idea of downloadable "Trivia games" for ST:TOS episodes, that would freeze the episode at various points for an onscreen fan trivia question ("What does the Klingon in the bar call Captain Kirk?"), to give the viewer time to guess before continuing.

It was the bad ideas that sank BD-Live, but we lost the good ideas with it.  😥

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Here’s some of the films I’ve watched in the past few days.

Se7en(1995). This was a very smart police thriller. Morgan Freeman is brilliant as usual and Brad Pitt was at his best here before he became a headline stealer. Gotta give it to Spacey to. He may be a creep but he is a dang good actor. I find myself becoming a big fan of David Fitchner recently. This is a great introduction to his work if you can stomach some pretty intense crime scene investigation. It’s not quite Silence of the Lambs, but Se7en is still a great time. 9/10.

I finally watched The Night of the Hunter(1955). Wow what a movie! Robert Mitchum is fantastic! His role as Rev. Harry Powell has got to be the best I’ve ever seen him. There is something about religion being used in an ironic way that always fascinates me. Lillian Gish was great to. Beautiful cinematography and editing as well. After watching this I really wish that Charles Laughton had directed more movies. 10/10.

I then watched The Thief of Bagdad(1940). I watched the original Douglas Fairbanks Jr. version on TCM not to long ago and loved it. I must say while I personally liked the original better, this version was a lot of fun. Big, grand fantasy adventure with some pretty great special effects for the time. It’s a little hokey at times and most of the cast plays just alright. But dang it it’s a great watch. 8/10.

Finally I watched City Slickers(1991). I love Billy Crystal and he’s hilarious in this funny, yet also pretty dramatic comedy. It has a sweet story with likable characters going through midlife crises. Jack Palance is the standout among the supporting cast. He was so good I swear he was just playing himself. Not every joke lands and some characters lack depth, but it’s still a good movie that I would gladly watch again. 8/10.

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22 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

TCM UNDERGROUND was set to repeat the duo of FINAL EXAM and ANOTHER SON OF SAM, only to find out that the rights to FINAL EXAM have been "snapped up" by AMAZON PRIME

Fasten your seat belts.....

Soon everything will be owned by 3 major corporations, knocking out all competitors with no choice but to pay handsomely for whatever we want.

Instead of freaking out, I'm hoping for a new wave of independents who will forge a new, more creative path.

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I forgot to mention that I watched THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD (1951) a few days back...

i've seen it numerous times, but this particular time one exchange of dialogue really stuck out to me as particularly brilliant

I really want to be able to quote the line accurately, so i went to imdb just now to try and find it and could not, so i have to paraphrase and i always do that BADLY, but here goes:

GUY: Captain, I been thinking, what happens if this THING is able to read our minds?

CAPTAIN: Then when it gets to me, he's gonna be awful mad.

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13 hours ago, rosebette said:

Perhaps Roberts  hoped for the success that James Garner had when he broke with Warner Brothers after Maverick and began making films.  But Pernell Roberts is no James Garner!  

Michael Landon was interviewed years after "Bonanza" had ended and simply said this about Roberts:

"I didn't get along with him and he didn't get along with me"

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Looking For Mr. Goodbar (1977) Date Noir

220px-Looking_for_Mr._Goodbar_%25281977_film%2529_poster.jpg


Written and Directed by Richard Brooks.

Brooks (directed Classic Film Noir (Deadline - U.S.A. (1952), Transitional Noir In Cold Blood (1967), and was screenwriter of notably The Killers (1946) (un-credited though), Brute Force (1947), Crossfire (1947), Key Largo (1948), Mystery Street (1950), Storm Warning (1951), Deadline - U.S.A. (1952), and In Cold Blood (1967)).

Brook's screenplay was based on the novel by Judith Rossner which in turn was based on an article she wrote about the real life murder of Roseann Quinn. The piece was intended for a special woman's issue of Esquire magazine. However the Esquire editors got cold feet for possible legal ramifications and decided not to publish. Rossner then used the material she researched in her novel.

Cinematography was by William A. Fraker (Bullitt (1968), Coonskin (1975), The Killer Inside Me (1976)), music was by Artie Kane.

The film Stars Diane Keaton as Theresa Dunn, Tuesday Weld as Katherine Dunn, William Atherton as James, Richard Kiley as Mr. Dunn, Richard Gere as Tony, Alan Feinstein as Martin, Tom Berenger as Gary, Priscilla Pointer as Mrs. Dunn, Alexander Courtney as Arthur, Joel Fabiani as Barney, Julius Harris as Black Cat, Richard Bright as George, LeVar Burton as Cap Jackson, Brian Dennehy as Surgeon, Richard Venture as Doctor, and Elizabeth Cheshire as Young Theresa.

Brooks paints a cautionary tale, multiple casual hook-ups can get your rear in a jam. In the code days women were either Madonnas or whores, in our post code world and in the real world BTW they can be both. Keaton and Weld are both excellent.

The only two critiques I've heard of the film are one, Brooks use of Theresa's confusing daydream sequences disrupting the flow of the story, and the initial decision to discard the part the real victim Rosanne Quinn played in her own demise. In the film Theresa Dunn is shown as basically picking her partners on whims or attraction.

In the true story Roseann Ouinn was shown to possibly be a bit of either a thrill seeking masochist. But questions remain. Was she picking her partners because they displayed damaged egos that she could manipulate, or maybe was it a warped extension of her help giver profession that she channeled into the realm of sexual help? Or was she just kinked that particular way and was looking for rough sex and trouble, and maybe that, was her antidote to being the overly sugary sweet, well loved teacher. Who knows. She just picked the wrong guy, once. Screen caps are from an online screener. 7/10

Full review with screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster pages.

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The Ballad of Josie (1967)  -  5/10

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Western comedy with Doris Day as a widowed single mother who struggles to survive in the untamed wilds of the Wyoming territory. After being pushed around and dismissed by the various cattle ranchers in the area, she decides to raise sheep, with the expected resulting tumult. Also featuring Peter Graves, George Kennedy, Andy Devine, David Hartman (in his movie debut), Don Stroud, Timothy Scott, Audrey Christie, Guy Raymond, Karen Jensen, Paul Fix, Robert Lowery, and William Talman in his final film. Day reportedly hated this movie, as it was one of the handful forced upon her by her husband Martin Melcher. The script is undercooked and stuffed full of cliches, and the direction by Andrew McLaglen is flat and routine. The large cast doesn't have much to work with, although Scott and Stroud as pseudo-hippie ranch hands are mildly amusing.

Source: internet

The-Ballad-of-Josie-1967-3.jpg

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

Lawrence, this still from the movie proves that they had hairspray and bouffant hairdos in the old West. I knew it!

I just googled bouffant hairdos. They evoke a sort of 40s look, some of them anyway. Was that the Golden Age of the Bouffant (I wonder?). I don't know so much about this sort of thing but they can look quite wonderful so long as they are not so grossly exaggerated as some indubitably are. I know they are quite passe-ay but I wish there was more of it in our current day. And gone for some time to come, I imagine. The various increments of the continuing Lib movements decree the severe and professional look. Cuteness and charm, the soft feminism of sugar and spice and everything nice is out ... definitely out.

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Berserk  (1967)  -  4/10

600full-berserk!-poster.jpg

Mystery-thriller with Joan Crawford as the tough-as-nails proprietor of a British traveling circus. A series of "accidents" leave members of the troupe dead, driving up ticket sales and drawing investigators. Could it be shady new-guy-in-town Ty Hardin has something to do with it? Also featuring Michael Gough, Judy Geeson, Diana Dors, Geoffrey Keen, Ambrosine Phillpotts, and Milton Reid. This feels a little like a Hammer movie, but with less blood and cleavage. The mystery never develops enough to intrigue, while the various romantic sub-plots (everyone wants to do Ty Hardin) aren't trashy enough. This was the last of Crawford's late career films that I hadn't seen, leaving only a handful of her early silent films unwatched. 

Source: internet

berserk1967_Joan-and-Ty.jpg?w=1280&ssl=1

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14 minutes ago, laffite said:

I just googled bouffant hairdos. They evoke a sort of 40s look, some of them anyway. Was that the Golden Age of the Bouffant (I wonder?). I don't know so much about this sort of thing but they can look quite wonderful so long as they are not so grossly exaggerated as some indubitably are. I know they are quite passe-ay but I wish there was more of it in our current day. And gone for some time to come, I imagine. The various increments of the continuing Lib movements decree the severe and professional look. Cuteness and charm, the soft feminism of sugar and spice and everything nice is out ... definitely out.

Whats the diff between Bouffant and Beehive? Beehive was late 50s early 60s, I reckon, from personal observations.

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16 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Whats the diff between Bouffant and Beehive? Beehive was late 50s early 60s, I reckon, from personal observations.

After taking a few brief glimpses of this, the oft upward spiral cone-head look is in most cases excessively unattractive. It didn't seem to bother Frankenstein though.

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The Bobo  (1967)  -  4/10

225px-Original_movie_poster_for_the_film

"Comedy" with Peter Sellers as Juan Bautista, a former matador and current aspiring singer. Local venue owner Carbonell (Adolfo Celi) agrees to book Bautista for a week in exchange for the bumbling matador seducing and humiliating local tease Olimpia Segura (Britt Ekland). Also featuring Rossano Brazzi, Hattie Jacques, Ferdy Mayne, Marne Maitland, and Al Lettieri. I thought this was dreadful, unfunny and tedious. Sellers coasts along with the barest of effort put forth, and this was a taste of his career throughout the coming decade.

Source: TCM

vlcsnap2010111009h10m34.4836.jpg

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On 7/13/2019 at 9:06 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

So I guess TCM UNDERGROUND was set to repeat the duo of FINAL EXAM and ANOTHER SON OF SAM, only to find out that the rights to FINAL EXAM have been "snapped up" by AMAZON PRIME (that's a buck o five they're not getting back.)

In its place was a film I have never heard of- ALONE IN THE DARK from 1982 (not to be confused with the video game or the UWE BOLL 2005 film that routinely makes "worst movies of all time lists.")

Final Exam (1981) sounds familiar, last time it was on it was with Night School (1981) and I think Canada missed out on the latter and got another Underground regular in its place, The Ice Pirates maybe. For Canada, Another Son of Sam was usually with Alone in the Dark and in two weeks, the school killer 1981 duo is poised to strike again. We aren't getting Night School and if Final Exam is taken out, it'll be one hell of a night before the Summer Under the Stars break.

 

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22 hours ago, laffite said:

And the Enola Gay was named after someone's mother. "Ok, here it comes all you below, here is a kiss from dear old mom."

Yes, the Enola Gay, the plane that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, was named in honor of the pilot's mother.

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13 minutes ago, rayban said:

Yes, the Enola Gay, the plane that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, was named in honor of the pilot's mother.

That is so decadent. It makes me ill. Absolutely depraved.

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