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speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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Saw 4 today, if you include late last night as today.

First off was Lola on TCM Imports at 2 AM. I thought that the best thing about it was the skillful performance of Armin Mueller-Stahl. Also worth noting is the absolutely crazy color scheme and lighting. It's like a day-glo version of Douglas Sirk on steroids. Barbara Sukowa as the title character made a memorable schemer.

Then, I finished watching a rental DVD, Hemingway's Adventures of a Young Man (1962). Film was quite episodic, a bit lumpy, but it was aided by a very impressive supporting cast (Jessica Tandy was a standout), many of the scenes were effecting and moving, and there was a lovely Franz Waxman score.

Then a DVD from the library: the 1962 version of Cape Fear. I had seen the remake in the past and hadn't much cared for it. This I thought was very well acted, very tense, but almost as disturbing and offputting as the remake (especially in the scene toward the end when Robert Mitchum is terrorizing Polly Bergen), although I will say that I think the story worked better in the original. Strong score, nice use of black and white.

Needing a bit of comic relief, I popped in a Bob Hope comedy Where's There's Life on DVD. Fun, breezy comedy with many amusing one-liners, and its all one of those fizzy suspense-comedies that make for effervescent viewing.

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7 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

My favorite will always be the 1968 Franco Zefferelli version. The color, costumes and music really put this one at the top for me.

You and Rayban both forgot Olivia Hussey.

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1 minute ago, Fedya said:

You and Rayban both forgot Olivia Hussey.

Olivia,  is kind of hard for me to forget.   She does look like a certain political figure.

Image result for Olivia Hussey.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, official portrait, 116th Congress.jpg

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The Cool Ones  (1967)  -  4/10

coolones-1.jpg

Musical satire of the mid-60's American music scene, with Gil Peterson as a has-been pop singer who meets dancer/aspiring singer Debbie Watson. The duo come to the attention of Phil Spector-esque music producer Roddy McDowell. Also featuring Robert Coote, Nita Talbot, Phil Harris, George Furth, Glen Campbell, and music performances by The Leaves, The Bantams, T.J. & The Fourmation, and Mrs. Miller. Like most movies that attempt to tap into youth zeitgeist, this comes across as hopelessly out of touch, square and corny. The fact that it's trying to be satirical doesn't stop it from feeling like your dad trying to sing the newest pop hit or your mom from performing the current fad dance. Directed by Gene Nelson and produced by William Conrad. Keep your eyes peeled for Teri Garr as a background dancer.

Source: TCM

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Cop-Out aka Stranger in the House  (1967)  -  6/10

MV5BYzE4N2JjNGYtZDcyOS00MzRhLTk3ZWEtZjVm

British drama with James Mason as a barrister who has fallen into drunken dissolution since his wife has left him. His teenage daughter (Geraldine Chaplin) has started running with a bad crowd, and when an American sailor is found murdered, Chaplin's boyfriend is charged with the crime. Mason tries to get his act together to defend the young man in court. Also featuring Bobby Darin, Paul Bertoya, Ian Ogilvy, and Megs Jenkins. The settings are dismal and gray, and few of the characters are finely drawn. However, Mason gives a terrific performance that almost elevates this beyond mediocrity. Darin on the other hand is awful, and this would be his next-to-last film role, with his next and final not coming until 6 years later.

Source: internet

 

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A Covenant with Death  (1967)  -  6/10

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Courtroom drama with George Maharis as a small-town attorney slated to become the local judge as the current one is retiring. This coincides with the first murder case in many years, with cuckolded husband Earl Holliman accused of killing his wife. Maharis also deals with various romantic troubles. Also featuring Laura Devon, Wende Wagner, Katy Jurado, John Anderson Gene Hackman, Kent Smith, Arthur O'Connell, Sidney Blackmer, Emilio Fernandez, Lonny Chapman, Paul Birch, and Whit Bissell. This uneven straddles the line between compelling drama and soapy melodrama. The cast is okay, but there are too many characters for the films 97 minutes to fully flesh out. I watched this for Hackman, who plays the local police chief.

Source: TCM

A-Covenant-with-Death-1967-2.jpg

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15 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Catalina Caper  (1967)  -  3/10

MPW-102872

Teen-appeal comedy with college student Tommy Kirk on vacation in Catalina. He gets mixed up with treasure-hunting gang in between music-and-dance sessions. Also featuring Del Moore, Peter (son of Dan) Duryea, Robert Donner, Ulla Stromstedt, Michael Blodgett, and Lyle Waggoner. I cheated and watched the Mystery Science Theater 3000 version, but I'm not sure I'd have made it through the "uncut" movie. Even a musical performance by an out-of-place Little Richard couldn't save this mess.

Source: YouTube

 

Anything with Tommy Kirk is worth a visit.

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12 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Saw 4 today, if you include late last night as today.

First off was Lola on TCM Imports at 2 AM. I thought that the best thing about it was the skillful performance of Armin Mueller-Stahl. Also worth noting is the absolutely crazy color scheme and lighting. It's like a day-glo version of Douglas Sirk on steroids. Barbara Sukowa as the title character made a memorable schemer.

Then, I finished watching a rental DVD, Hemingway's Adventures of a Young Man (1962). Film was quite episodic, a bit lumpy, but it was aided by a very impressive supporting cast (Jessica Tandy was a standout), many of the scenes were effecting and moving, and there was a lovely Franz Waxman score.

Then a DVD from the library: the 1962 version of Cape Fear. I had seen the remake in the past and hadn't much cared for it. This I thought was very well acted, very tense, but almost as disturbing and offputting as the remake (especially in the scene toward the end when Robert Mitchum is terrorizing Polly Bergen), although I will say that I think the story worked better in the original. Strong score, nice use of black and white.

Needing a bit of comic relief, I popped in a Bob Hope comedy Where's There's Life on DVD. Fun, breezy comedy with many amusing one-liners, and its all one of those fizzy suspense-comedies that make for effervescent viewing.

"Hemingway's Adventures of a Young Man" should have a much better reputation.

The entire cast is excellent, including Paul Newman in a small role.

The film should have made Richard Beymer a star.

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11 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Cool Ones  (1967)  -  4/10

coolones-1.jpg

Musical satire of the mid-60's American music scene, with Gil Peterson as a has-been pop singer who meets dancer/aspiring singer Debbie Watson. The duo come to the attention of Phil Spector-esque music producer Roddy McDowell. Also featuring Robert Coote, Nita Talbot, Phil Harris, George Furth, Glen Campbell, and music performances by The Leaves, The Bantams, T.J. & The Fourmation, and Mrs. Miller. Like most movies that attempt to tap into youth zeitgeist, this comes across as hopelessly out of touch, square and corny. The fact that it's trying to be satirical doesn't stop it from feeling like your dad trying to sing the newest pop hit or your mom from performing the current fad dance. Directed by Gene Nelson and produced by William Conrad. Keep your eyes peeled for Teri Garr as a background dancer.

Source: TCM

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It's one of those not-so-hot films that you're fascinated by.

Roddy McDowall is giving a one-of-a-kind performance.

And Gil Peterson and Debbie Watson cannot be missed.

The fact that it was directed by Gene Nelson saves it from the trash heap.

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I vatched VERONIKA VOSS (1982)- it is the third FASSBINDER FILM I have seen, after ALI: FEAR EATS THE SOUL (which is terrific) and QUERELLE (which is not terrific, but compelling nonetheless.)

I knew nothing about FASSBINDER going in to ALI, and after watching and loving it, I imdb/wiki'd him, and was bummed to learn that he was apparently a terribly unpleasant person who berated and openly abused his casts and crews and directed while wearing ***less chaps and snorting AMIL NITRITE.

And yet, EVERY MINUTE OF VERONIKA IS GORGEOUS....If you love black and white, and I do, you will adore this film:

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSDI_1Qi-PlNAJFfJzMdIC every frame is poetry.

it is a film of which THE LATE FRED C DOBBS would say "nothing happens" and maybe he would be right...but at the same time I've rarely seen "nothing happen" in such a gloriously, meticulously, highly intelligent way. 

(and for the record, things do happen in VERONIKA VOSS, or one should maybe say they languidly occur on screen.)

note: confusing edit i can't un-do:

 
       
     
Cast overview, first billed only:
Rosel Zech Rosel Zech ... Veronika Voss
Hilmar Thate Hilmar Thate ... Robert Krohn
Cornelia Froboess Cornelia Froboess ... Henriette
Annemarie Düringer Annemarie Düringer ... Dr. Marianne Katz
       
       

the actress playing the titular lead was MARVELOUS, reminded me quite a bit of both JEANNE EAGELS and GLENN CLOSE...Her male costar was like a short, sexy STUART WHITMAN...or maybe I should say a GERMAN BOB HOSKINS? He was great and had a real FILM NOIR sort of face.

Sweetsweet, memories you gave to me...

 

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note- i accidentally pasted part of the imdb cast list in the middle of my above review and deleting it - for some reason- makes a mess

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Custer of the West  (1967)  -  5/10

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Epic western biopic of General George Armstrong Custer (Robert Shaw), tracing his career from Civil War boy wonder to controversial figure in the western Indian Wars. He finds moral support from his wife Elizabeth (Mary Ure). Also featuring Jeffrey Hunter, Ty Hardin, Lawrence Tierney, Kieron Moore, Marc Lawrence, and Robert Ryan. Running nearly two and a half hours, this still comes across as choppy and rushed in some places, while dragging in others. Shaw seems miscast in the lead, and his accent comes and goes. Ure isn't given much to do. The film's highlight may be Robert Ryan's brief cameo as an AWOL soldier with gold fever. 

Source: internet

 

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Deadlier Than the Male  (1967)  -  6/10

deadlier-than-the-male-1967_u-L-P9A70W0.

British spy thriller that updates and greatly alter the "Sapper" character Bulldog Drummond. In this iteration, Drummond (Richard Johnson) works on behalf of friend Sir John (Laurence Naismith), essentially acting as a British agent not unlike James Bond. He tries to stop a gang of female assassins operating on an international scale, as well as discover who is the mastermind behind them. Also featuring Elke Sommer, Sylva Koscina, Suzanna Leigh, Nigel Green, Steve Carlson, Virginia North, Justine Lord, Leonard Rossiter, and Milton Reid. An updating of the traditional character in contemporary settings would have been preferable, but this ends up just being another Bond-wannabe retread, although there's some nice scenery and a lot of beautiful women.

Source: internet

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23 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Deadlier Than the Male  (1967)  -  6/10

British spy thriller that updates and greatly alter the "Sapper" character Bulldog Drummond. In this iteration, Drummond (Richard Johnson) works on behalf of friend Sir John (Laurence Naismith), essentially acting as a British agent not unlike James Bond.

Darn, I was JUST about to review that (having found it on Amazon Prime)--

And yes, looked like the push for non-Broccoli 007 knockoffs led one producer to think "What OTHER British queen-and-country action heroes have had classic adventure-novel series?".  As Bond-wannabes go, it's got the better British feel that all the "foreigners" didn't, but it's no "The Poppy Is Also a Flower".  😁

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Devil's Angels  (1967)  -  4/10

Devil's_Angels.jpg

Producer Roger Corman rushed this AIP biker pic into production after the success of the previous year's The Wild Angels had kick-started the biker-flick exploitation craze. John Cassavetes stars as Cody, the leader of an L.A.-based biker gang. When one of their members is involved in a hit-and-run fatality, the whole crew hit the road, eventually ending up in a small desert town where they terrorize the locals. Also featuring Beverly Adams, Mimsy Farmer, Maurice McEndree, Russ Bender, Buck Kartalian, Wally Campo, and Leo Gordon as the sheriff. There's the usual biker-movie cliches: destruction of private property, attempted sexual assault, LSD freak-out, and lots & lots of driving footage with bad rock music on the soundtrack. This one barely bothers with a script, and much of the little that happens seems improvised. Cassavetes also seems out of place, looking too clean-cut compared to the rest of the gang. 

Source: YouTube

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Django Kill...If You Live, Shoot!  (1967)  -  7/10

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Spaghetti western with Tomas Milian as "The Stranger", who is left for dead and buried in the desert after being betrayed by his former compadres. He's "resurrected" by a pair of odd Native medicine men who agree to assist the Stranger as long he imparts the wisdom he's gained from being in the spirit world. They end up in a small town where various factions are fighting over bags of gold dust. Also featuring Marilu Tolo, Piero Lulli, Milo Quesada, Ray Lovelock, Francisco Sanz, Miguel Serrano, Angel Silva, Sancho Gracia, and Roberto Camardiel as "Sorrow". This is a bizarre western even by spaghetti standards. It's violent, bloody and outrageous. The "hero" uses bullets made of gold, so if someone survives a shooting, others try to tear them apart to get to the valuable nuggets inside their bodies. The oddest aspect to the film may be the "Sorrow" character, a portly bearded rancher with a small army of gay gunfighters in his employ, all wearing matching uniforms. The script is a mess, and the direction by Giulio Questi is uneven, but cult film fans may enjoy seeing this for the uniqueness of it. Oh, and it has no characters named "Django", or any connection to other films with Django in the title.

Source: Blue Underground DVD

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Doctor Faustus  (1967)  -  4/10

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Adaptation of the Christopher Marlowe play about the learned Dr. Faustus (Richard Burton) who sells his soul to the devil for more knowledge and worldly pleasures. With Elizabeth Taylor as the woman of his dreams. This was made in conjunction with the Oxford University Dramatic Society, and the rest of the cast (who all get "introducing" credits) come from their ranks. The staging is claustrophobic, while the costuming is the highlight. I found the rest of it tedious and dull. I'll stick with Faust (1926).

Source: internet

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Start the Revolution Without Me (1970)

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Usually the flick after the midnight showing of Noir Alley is a gem and this is no exception. I was more sold on the narration at the start but it slowly grew on me and by the second half I was having a ball with it. The ballroom scene was a perfect mixture of wordplay, visual gags, concluding gags, sight gags, even parodies! It just feels like the parodies have more umph just for the setting. The French Revolution, they made it fun. And the ending, that was glorious. Wonka and Oddball, playing for two and then some to really sell this movie.

8/10

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Dont Look Back  (1967)  -  8/10

DontLookBack2.jpg

D.A. Pennebaker's fly-on-the-wall documentary following Bob Dylan on his 1965 British tour. He clashes with reporters, sings some songs, smokes a lot of cigarettes, and generally acts like a 24-year-old feeling his way around global fame and success. Featuring Joan Baez, and Donovan. Aspects of this film have been part the American cultural lexicon for decades, but I just never got around to watching the whole thing until now. I'm not a devotee of the cult of Dylan, but I respect his impact on music and society, particularly at that time. The film provides an glimpse at one of America's premiere artists of the past 50 years, and for that alone it is invaluable.

Source: The Criterion Channel

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12 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Dont Look Back  (1967)  -  8/10

DontLookBack2.jpg

D.A. Pennebaker's fly-on-the-wall documentary following Bob Dylan on his 1965 British tour. He clashes with reporters, sings some songs, smokes a lot of cigarettes, and generally acts like a 24-year-old feeling his way around global fame and success. Featuring Joan Baez, and Donovan. Aspects of this film have been part the American cultural lexicon for decades, but I just never got around to watching the whole thing until now. I'm not a devotee of the cult of Dylan, but I respect his impact on music and society, particularly at that time. The film provides an glimpse at one of America's premiere artists of the past 50 years, and for that alone it is invaluable.

Source: The Criterion Channel

I am big fan of Dylan and this was an interesting documentary on one of his most creative periods. My favorite scene was an argument with a drunk in his room who threw a glass out of the hotel window.

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Destination Moon (1950) 6/10

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I hadn't seen this early sci-fi flick in years and I enjoyed it on TCM last night.

We see a crew of men from the worlds of aviation, science and the military planning the first trip to the moon. It is slow moving but once they get into space it is quite entertaining. The special effects are still pretty good even today (they won an Oscar in 1950) and if you compare it to the actual moon landing 19 years later, they seem to have gotten some things fairly correct. The scene where one of the crew is set adrift in space is pretty suspenseful. One thing I really enjoyed was Dick Wesson as a wisecracking electronics expert from Brooklyn, a funny scene where he talks to Earth over the radio ("Oith! Come in Oith"). Oh and Woody Woodpecker makes an appearance early in the film.

 

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The Double Man  (1967)  -  6/10

Poster_of_The_Double_Man_(1967_film).jpg

Spy thriller with Yul Brynner as a veteran CIA man who travels to Austria after his son is killed in a skiing accident. Brynner soon learns that there's a Soviet plot to replace with a physical double. Also featuring Britt Ekland, Clive Revill, Anton Diffring, Lloyd Nolan, Moira Lister, and Brandon Brady. This is a merely okay mystery/suspense/drama with few surprises. Brynner is good, and the alpine scenery is nice.

Source: TCM

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I just watched the CBS News special "Man on the Moon" marking the 50th anniversary of the moon landing.  It showed the original coverage with Walter Cronkite, an interview Ed Bradley did with Neil Armstrong in 2005, clips of the beginnings of the space program, and JFK speech. ("We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard.")  The special really gave you a sense of how the whole country came together to watch this event with excitement and joy but also holding their collective breath not knowing if the astronauts would make it back safely.  I watched it with a tween who really enjoyed the special.  We talked about what event could have that same effect now.  Landing on Mars?  Anything ?

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Ex Lady (1933).  I watched this Bette Davis pre-code the other night.  I can't say it was one of her best films, not one of her worst either.  Apparently this film was a remake of the Barbara Stanwyck pre-code, Illicit (1931). I remember being disappointed by the Stanwyck film.  It definitely did not live up to its title.  Davis' effort I think was a little better, but it wasn't that great either.  I don't know what the title, Ex Lady, had to do with anything.  Did she become a "lady" when she married, and then became an "ex lady" when she decided to play the field again? I'm not sure.  One of Davis' paramours mentioned having six ex-ladies and that Davis could become lucky # 7.  Maybe that passing comment was the inspiration for the title? It hardly seemed significant enough to warrant it, but who knows.

Anyway, in this film, Davis plays Helen Bauer, a 20-something woman who does not want to be married.  She feels that married people become boring and dull.  She lives with her boyfriend, Gene Raymond, much to the chagrin of her conservative German (?) immigrant parents.  Her father basically calls her a w h o r e for shacking up with Raymond, and he doesn't think much of Raymond either.  Her mother is portrayed as being highly submissive to her husband and she doesn't utter a word in the entire scene.  She seemingly is offering comfort to daughter Davis, to me implying that she isn't as against her daughter's lifestyle as her husband is. 

Raymond keeps suggesting to Davis that they should marry.  He loves her and wants to make their relationship legitimate.  It also seems like he wants to keep Davis' father off their backs.  Davis keeps resisting, saying that she doesn't want to hurt their relationship by marrying.  Then, for whatever reason, she randomly pops the question to Raymond! They marry.  As Davis predicted, their life becomes dull. All Davis and Raymond seem to do is fight--especially when Davis' illustration career seems to be more successful than Raymond's advertising one. 

The couple, bored and upset with one another, both take lovers on the side and soon both sides of the relationship are jealous. 

I think this movie was trying to promote the idea that unattached relationships with spontaneous sex here and there and not having to make a legal commitment to one another was the way to go.  They tried to show the other side of the coin by having Raymond and Davis marry and seemingly all the exciting sex stops, except for a rendezvous outside a Havana nightclub.  They both take on paramours to try and reignite the flame missing in their lives.  The movie seemed to harp on this idea over and over again.  By the end I was thinking, "ugh, just be married or don't already!" 

I also didn't really understand the point of Frank McHugh's character.  He was just kind of there... 

I was amused by one of the scenes towards the end where Davis keeps slapping her face as she expresses her unhappiness with Raymond.  I'll assume that this is some 1930s beauty treatment?

I don't know if this is the best Bette Davis film that the author could have chosen for her "Dynamic Dames" book. 

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10 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I don't know if this is the best Bette Davis film that the author could have chosen for her "Dynamic Dames" book. 

Nice write up.   Yea,  I also found it odd Ex Lady was chosen for the book.    Maybe the author was trying to be different by not selecting a better known Davis film or one where she was nominated?????

E.g.  Dangerous fits "Dynamic Dames" but Davis won for Best Actress (as a make-up for Human Bondage), so covering that film might have felt like been-there-done-that.

 

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