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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

Zabriskie Point (1970) 

Zabriskie Point Poster

Directed by Michelangelo Antonioni starring Mark Frechette, Daria Halprin, and Rod Taylor. Some beautiful cinematography of Death Valley the Mojave Desert and also of Southern Arizona. Never saw it the first go round, it's of it's time. Counter culture Art Film, politics, smoking weed, civil rights, hippies etc., etc., with a soundtrack by Pink Floyd, The Youngbloods, Kaleidoscope, Jerry Garcia, Patti Page, Grateful Dead, the Rolling Stones, John Fahey and Roy Orbison who wrote and sang the theme song, over the credits, called "So Young (Love Theme From "Zabriskie Point")". 6/10

Source on line screener, that if it wasn't free I probably wouldn't have watched it.

Somehow, this one gets better with time.

Mark Frechette went to prison due to his involvement in a bank  robbery.

He died in prison under mysterious circumstances.

A recent memoir by an activist who was involved with Frechette identifies him as gay.

He had a bit of a career in Italy.

mark-frechette-daria-halprin-zabriskie-p

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23 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Tiger Makes Out  (1967)  -  5/10

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Comedy based on a play by Murray Shisgal, the same guy who wrote the play that Luv was based on. The two have some similarity, but this one worked a bit better. It's still nothing I need to ever revisit. Eli Wallach stars as an oddball NYC mailman who grows lonely and decides to kidnap a woman to be his mate. He intends to grab a young beauty, but instead takes unhappy middle-aged housewife Anne Jackson. Also featuring Bob Dishy, John Harkins, Ruth White, Rae Allen, Charles Nelson Reilly, Frances Sternhagen, Elizabeth Wilson, David Doyle, Joe Santos, James Luisi, John P. Ryan, Swoosie Kurtz, and Dustin Hoffman in his debut. I enjoyed seeing all the familiar faces in early roles, and Jackson is very good. 

Source: getTV

 

This one was based on a stage double bill - "The Typists and The Tiger".

It was a personal project for Eli Wallach and Anne Jackson.
 

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57 minutes ago, rosebette said:

I found Raymond physically attractive in Ex-Lady, but like the leading men in many of Davis' films, fairly bland.  I enjoyed her in this movie -- she is really attractive, forthright, independent, and even sexy.   The "other man" part was made for Ricardo Cortez, and was sorry not to see him in that role.  Watching Raymond confirms why Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers shot to stardom after Flying Down to Rio, because they were the most happening thing in that musical; Raymond and Del Rio are gorgeous, but not much else.  

When I watched Raymond, I also thought about another early 30s blonde guy with whom I recently have become obsessed -- Douglas Montgomery.  I thought his performance as the young innocent soldier in Waterloo Bridge was so natural and honest.  Then, I saw him in Music in the Air, and thought he was about the handsomest thing going -- in leiderhosen yet.  He was Laurie in Little Women and had a couple of other roles, then went to the B's, and later to Britain.  Apparently, he was also the actor who played Ashley for many of the screen tests in Gone with the Wind (but the part went to the more mature and also blonde Leslie Howard).   Philips Holmes is another blonde actor that comes to mind as someone who was popular in the early 30s and faded away.   It does seem as if audiences favored blonde women, but that blonde men equaled bland (except for Cagney -- but maybe he was really a redhead).

Phillips Holmes entered World War II via Canada and was killed in a mid-air plane crash. 

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His beauty is almost indescribable.

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Candy  (1968)  -  6/10

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Satirical comedy based on the novel by Terry Southern. Sexpot high school student Candy (Ewa Aulin) drifts through her chaotic life from one man to another, each seeking to exploit her, including famous poet MacPhisto (Richard Burton), Mexican gardener Emmanuel (Ringo Starr), gung-ho army Gen. Smight (Walter Matthau), obnoxious surgeon Dr. Krankeit (James Coburn), a hunchback juggler (Charles Aznavour), and a East Indian guru (Marlon Brando). Also featuring John Astin (in a dual role), John Huston, Elsa Martinelli, Anita Pallenberg, Florinda Bolkan, Marilu Tolo, and Sugar Ray Robinson. The script by Buck Henry is broad and without much structure. The characters too are caricatures, but that's kind of the point. Aulin doesn't do much but look really good while occasionally cooing in her accented baby-doll voice. Very much a movie of its time, but still intermittently funny and rarely boring. This was the final Marlon Brando film that I had not seen. He's said to have regarded it as his worst.

Source: Kino Lorber DVD

 

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The Curse of Her Flesh  (1968)  -  2/10

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Sequel to 1967's The Touch of Her Flesh sees the return of eye-patch wearing serial murderer Richard Jennings (writer-director Michael Findlay, using the stage name Robert Wester). This is more of the same, with much of the brief running time taken up by bad stripper acts and clumsy imitated sex scenes between unattractive people, filmed with the bare minimum of technique (as in, they knew how to turn the camera on but that's about it). Followed by a sequel that same year. Ugh.

Source: Something Weird DVD

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Damned Hot Day of Fire aka Gatling Gun  (1968)  -  6/10

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Spaghetti western with John Ireland as a vicious half-breed bandit names Tarpas. He kidnaps munitions inventor Richard Gatling (Ennio Balbo) as well as the prototype of his new machine gun. Since this is during the height of the Civil War, Tarpas, along with a mysterious partner, plans to ransom Gatling the man to the Union forces, and sell the prototype Gatling gun to the Confederates. The Pinkerton Agency sends Captain Chris Tanner (Robert Woods) to try and rescue both the man and his gun. Also featuring Evelyn Stewart, Claudie Lange, Gerard Herter, Tiziano Cortini, George Rigaud, and Roberto Camardiel. I thought the movie was uneven, but not without some saving graces, such as Ireland, who is good as the hot-tempered villain.

Source: Mill Creek Blu ray

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On 7/19/2019 at 2:30 PM, TomJH said:

The one film in which I thought Gene Raymond was effectively cast was by Hitchcock in Mr. and Mrs. Smith. And that's because in the film he played a square, a charisma-challenged stiff who was the boyfriend of Carole Lombard, his entire purpose in the film to make it apparent to the audience (long before Lombard does, of course) that she should drop this drip and return to her husband (Robert Montgomery), with whom she has far more in common (including, unlike Raymond, the possession of a personality).

Gosh, I seem to have completely forgotten about this film. I'm sure there has been a thread asking for great beginnings to movies. This is one of the best. Something so modern and unorthodox about the opening bedroom scene and the scene that follows has to go down as one of the greatest breakfast table scenes ever (wherein a cautionary piece of advice is presented, namely, don't ask your spouse dangerous questions the answers of which may change your life and force you into drastic actions). And while on the subject of Carole, I've been fond of the opening scene In Name Only where she is spending her lunch hour doing a little fishing. The conversation she has with Cary is so beautifully written, acted, and intoned.

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Fear Chamber aka The Torture Zone (1968)  -  3/10

Fear_Chamber.jpg

Horror/science fiction film from Mexico, with Boris Karloff as a kindly but sickly old scientist. His daughter (Julissa) and a colleague, who both work at the laboratory Boris runs, discover a living rock creature deep underground. They learn that the creature needs fear to survive (how was it living underground, then?), so they stage scary encounters with hapless women in order to keep the creature alive. 

In 1968, Karloff struck a deal with Mexican producer Luis Enrique Vergara to shoot a bunch of scenes (all filmed in L.A. by Jack Hill), after which Vergara would take this footage and film full movies around them. They are generally considered the worst films of Karloff's career, and some of the worst movies ever made. I've previously avoided them, but decided to finally watch them now. This one is pretty weird, and very stupid. There are topless dance scenes (not by Karloff, alas), a malevolent dwarf, gruesome torments, and some psychedelic imagery. Karloff is very feeble looking, but he gives it his all. Bad movie fans should enjoy this; all others be forewarned.

Source: VCI DVD

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2 hours ago, laffite said:

Gosh, I seem to have completely forgotten about this film. I'm sure there has been a thread asking for great beginnings to movies. This is one of the best. Something so modern and unorthodox about the opening bedroom scene and the scene that follows has to go down as one of the greatest breakfast table scenes ever (wherein a cautionary piece of advice is presented, namely, don't ask your spouse dangerous questions the answers of which may change your life and force you into drastic actions). And while on the subject of Carole, I've been fond of the opening scene In Name Only where she is spending her lunch hour doing a little fishing. The conversation she has with Cary is so beautifully written, acted, and intoned.

After establishing herself as a comedy queen, Lombard launched herself into a series of soap operas and dramas. In Name Only is one of the best of these. However, in retrospect, it's rather unfortunate, I feel, that Lombard did these dramas. She was quite adequate in them but it's the comedies in which she really shines. As fate would have it, though, (if you believe in fate) time was running out for Carole Lombard.

Fortunately, with Mr. and Mrs. Smith and To Be Or Not To Be, she would be back to comedy with her final two screen efforts. I think that Lombard and Robert Montgomery have delicious chemistry (a really under appreciated screen teaming) in the Hitchcock film, while, for my money, Carole may never have looked more glamourous than when she played straight lady to Jack Benny in the Lubitsch film. The lady's final two screen credits do her legend as a screen comedienne great credit.

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6 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Candy  (1968)  -  6/10

large.jpg

Satirical comedy based on the novel by Terry Southern. Sexpot high school student Candy (Ewa Aulin) drifts through her chaotic life from one man to another, each seeking to exploit her, including famous poet MacPhisto (Richard Burton), Mexican gardener Emmanuel (Ringo Starr), gung-ho army Gen. Smight (Walter Matthau), obnoxious surgeon Dr. Krankeit (James Coburn), a hunchback juggler (Charles Aznavour), and a East Indian guru (Marlon Brando). Also featuring John Astin (in a dual role), John Huston, Elsa Martinelli, Anita Pallenberg, Florinda Bolkan, Marilu Tolo, and Sugar Ray Robinson. The script by Buck Henry is broad and without much structure. The characters too are caricatures, but that's kind of the point. Aulin doesn't do much but look really good while occasionally cooing in her accented baby-doll voice. Very much a movie of its time, but still intermittently funny and rarely boring. This was the final Marlon Brando film that I had not seen. He's said to have regarded it as his worst.

Source: Kino Lorber DVD

 

I remember how eagerly awaited this film was. I never got around to seeing it because it did not have good word of mouth. Just before the film opened, I recall seeing Ewa Aulin and Vanessa Redgrave on a talk show (Johnny Carson, maybe?). The two actresses were on together because both have recently played nude scenes in movies.

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The Great Silence  (1968)  -  9/10

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Spaghetti western from director Sergio Corbucci. Jean-Louis Trintignant stars as Silence, a mute bounty hunter who accepts a job from a recent widow (Vonetta McGee) to hunt down another bounty hunter, Loco (Klaus Kinski), who killed her husband. Also featuring Frank Wolff, Luigi Pistilli, Mario Brega, and Carlo D'Angelo. Bolstered by a terrific Ennio Morricone score and beautiful snowy locations, this is a unique entry in the western genre, with unusual characters, and an ending unlike any other that I've seen. The entire cast is fantastic, with Kinski playing the best role of career as the amoral villain. Highly recommended.

Source: Film Movement DVD

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Great Silence  (1968)  -  9/10

13974c159373c00f854156dd9d03ae0a.jpg

Spaghetti western from director Sergio Corbucci. Jean-Louis Trintignant stars as Silence, a mute bounty hunter who accepts a job from a recent widow (Vonetta McGee) to hunt down another bounty hunter, Loco (Klaus Kinski), who killed her husband. Also featuring Frank Wolff, Luigi Pistilli, Mario Brega, and Carlo D'Angelo. Bolstered by a terrific Ennio Morricone score and beautiful snowy locations, this is a unique entry in the western genre, with unusual characters, and an ending unlike any other that I've seen. The entire cast is fantastic, with Kinski playing the best role of career as the amoral villain. Highly recommended.

Source: Film Movement DVD

I wrote this back in 2006 about Sergio Corbucci:

"I know I've said this before in other threads, but this director is an enigma, he really needs an SW book devoted to his body of work. 

Now either Leone is a phenom, or just very lucky in his career arc since it seems to me that every Western film of his pretty much followed a path of getting progressively better and better from A Fistful Of D through the project that he took over, DYS. As budgets increased so did the spectacle.

Sergio Solllima to a slightly lesser extent followed suit, Corbucci however seems to be all over the map. Of the ones (SW's) I've seen:

Django 1966 (ok),  Navajo Joe 1966 (eh), The Mercenary 1968 (great), The Great Silence 1968 (excellent), The  Specialists 1969 (W*T*F?), Companero's  1970 (great)

So how do the following fit in for those of you that have seen them.  

Massacre At Grand Canyon 1965, Minnesota Clay 1965, Ringo And His Golden Pistol 1966, The Helbenders 1967, Sony & Jed 1972, What Am I Doing In The Middle of A Revolution 1973, The White The Yellow And The Black 1975. 

I know some like, The Hellbenders and Sonny & Jed, ..."

 

I've since seen The Hellbenders with Joseph Cotton which is watchable.

The Great Silence is probably Corbucci's greatest Western all'italiana (as the Italian's prefer to call them). Two others I really like are  Companeros (1970) Vamos a matar, compañeros (original title) with Franco Nero, and Tomas Milian, and The Mercenary (1968) Il mercenario with Franco Nero, Tony Musante, and Jack Palance. Others of note are the original Django (1966) with Franco Nero, and The Cruel Ones (1967) aka "The Hellbenders" with Joseph Cotton.

The ones I didn't like are Navajo Joe (1966) with Burt Reynolds, and The Specialists (1969) with French singing star Johnny Hallyday which was pretty ridiculous.

Since I like Tomas Milian and I see that Sony & Jed is now out on DVD I may give it a spin.

 

Now the rights to The Great Silence was supposedly bought up by Clint Eastwood or Malpaso and was reworked into the story line for Joe Kidd, there is even a Mauser Bolo machine pistol in it. Also that one scene where Silence reveals his knife scar is awfully similar to a scene in Eastwood's Hang 'em High where Eastwood reveals his hanging rope scar.

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2 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I wrote this back in 2006 about Sergio Corbucci:

"I know I've said this before in other threads, but this director is an enigma, he really needs an SW book devoted to his body of work. 

Now either Leone is a phenom, or just very lucky in his career arc since it seems to me that every Western film of his pretty much followed a path of getting progressively better and better from A Fistful Of D through the project that he took over, DYS. As budgets increased so did the spectacle.

Sergio Solllima to a slightly lesser extent followed suit, Corbucci however seems to be all over the map. Of the ones (SW's) I've seen:

Django 1966 (ok),  Navajo Joe 1966 (eh), The Mercenary 1968 (great), The Great Silence 1968 (excellent), The  Specialists 1969 (W*T*F?), Companero's  1970 (great)

So how do the following fit in for those of you that have seen them.  

Massacre At Grand Canyon 1965, Minnesota Clay 1965, Ringo And His Golden Pistol 1966, The Helbenders 1967, Sony & Jed 1972, What Am I Doing In The Middle of A Revolution 1973, The White The Yellow And The Black 1975. 

I know some like, The Hellbenders and Sonny & Jed, ..."

I've since seen The Hellbenders with Joseph Cotton which is watchable.

The Great Silence is probably Corbucci's greatest Western all'italiana (as the Italian's prefer to call them). Two others I really like are  Companeros (1970) Vamos a matar, compañeros (original title) with Franco Nero, and Tomas Milian, and The Mercenary (1968) Il mercenario with Franco Nero, Tony Musante, and Jack Palance. Others of note are the original Django (1966) with Franco Nero, and The Cruel Ones (1967) aka "The Hellbenders" with Joseph Cotton.

The ones I didn't like are Navajo Joe (1966) with Burt Reynolds, and The Specialists (1969) with French singing star Johnny Hallyday which was pretty ridiculous.

Since I like Tomas Milian and I see that Sony & Jed is now out on DVD I may give it a spin.

Now the rights to The Great Silence was supposedly bought up by Clint Eastwood or Malpaso and was reworked into the story line for Joe Kidd, there is even a Mauser Bolo machine pistol in it. Also that one scene where Silence reveals his knife scar is awfully similar to a scene in Eastwood's Hang 'em High where Eastwood reveals his hanging rope scar.

I like Django a lot (in my top ten spaghetti westerns), and I too wasn't fond of Navajo Joe. I haven't seen any of the others, although I have Companeros in my stack to watch.

As for Corbucci, I've also seen The Slave (1962, 6/10), Castle of Blood (1964, 7/10), and Super Fuzz (1980, 5/10). So he covered all of the Italian genre film bases.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

As for Corbucci, I've also seen The Slave (1962, 6/10), Castle of Blood (1964, 7/10), and Super Fuzz (1980, 5/10). So he covered all of the Italian genre film bases.

I'm no fan of spaghetti Westerns, but Super Fuzz has a particularly fond place in the hearts of latchkey kids who grew up with HBO in the early-80's house.  Or the theme song does, if nothing else.  🎵😄

(Now streaming on the PD backwaters of Amazon Prime, under its original Italian title of "Super Snooper".)

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9 hours ago, kingrat said:

I remember how eagerly awaited this film was. I never got around to seeing it because it did not have good word of mouth. Just before the film opened, I recall seeing Ewa Aulin and Vanessa Redgrave on a talk show (Johnny Carson, maybe?). The two actresses were on together because both have recently played nude scenes in movies.

I enjoyed the book, but the film was dreadful.

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"Accident" - Joseph Losey - 1967 -

starring Dirk Bogarde, Stanley Baker, Jacqueline Sassard, Michael York, Vivien Merchant, etc.

This film has haunted me for many years -

but to talk about it would be equivalent to giving away its' secrets -

it's such a polished piece of work -

and such an idiosyncratic piece of work -

but its' view of human beings is just so negative -

like being unable to turn away from "an accident" - 

becoming fascinated by it -

superbly written, directed and acted -

it really does stand alone - 

Accident-1967-film-images-80d65aba-127f-

accident-1967-720p-largescreenshot3.jpg

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Sorry, RAY.....

But if my chin hadn't slipped off the hand it was resting on and woke me up, I'd have missed the last TWO thirds of this "sleeper" instead of just the MIDDLE 3rd.  re: "sleeper"

Usually a term reserved for movies not expected to do well but wind up being big "hits" ( '79's BREAKING AWAY was often described like this).  But in this case, it literally fits the bill.  ;) 

Sepiatone

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Been re-watching one of the funniest sit-coms ever from early TV - Car 54, Where Are You? (1961–1963). A uniquely New York show filmed practically entirely in the Bronx at Biograph Studios. 

Created by comedy genius  Nat Hiken (The Phil Silvers Show (1955 - 1957)

It starred:

Joe E. Ross  and Fred Gwynne  as two squad car patrolmen, a sort of Mutt & Jeff comedy team with the rest of the regulars being...


Paul Reed 
Al Lewis 
Hank Garrett 
Beatrice Pons 
Jack Healy 
Albert Henderson 
Frederick O'Neal 
Jimmy Little 
Nipsey Russell 
Ruth Masters  
Charlotte Rae
Jim Gormley 
Joe Warren 
Bruce Kirby  
Duke Farley 
Phillip Carter 
Gerald Hiken  
Mickey Deems 
Mel Stewart 
Lawrence Fletcher  
Ossie Davis 

And guest starred...


Nathaniel Frey  
Jerome Guardino
Martha Greenhouse 
Heywood Hale Broun 
Jake LaMotta 
John C. Becher  
Matt Crowley 
Maurice Brenner   
Lou Polan 
Larry Storch 
Billy Sands 
Shelley Burton  
Al Nesor 
Patricia Bright  
Bernard West 
Michael Vale
Dort Clark
Paul Lipson  
Shari Lewis   
Charles Nelson Reilly 
Margaret Hamilton  
Hugh Downs  
Maureen Stapleton 
Wally Cox 
Mitch Miller   
Jan Murray  
Tom Bosley  
Sugar Ray Robinson  
Simon Oakland  
Jack Gilford 
Rocky Graziano 
Richard Morse  
Frank Campanella  
Godfrey Cambridge 
Shelley Berman   
 

Complete series all available on DVD. 

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

Nipsey Russell   
Charlotte Rae
Bruce Kirby  

I too watched all the CAR 54's a year or so ago-what a revelation! I was too young to remember anything about it except that my older brother laughed his ashes off.

For the most part it was very well written, so gentle by today's standards. My only beef was Toody's dumb Ooo-ooh. But NYC cops personally helping out someone on their "beat" by picking up groceries? Amazing how much the world has changed.

Great to see Charlotte Rae & Nipsey Russell so young, although they didn't change much as they aged. And Bruce Kirby is Bruno Kirby's Dad, they look so much alike at the same age.

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2 hours ago, rayban said:

"Accident" - Joseph Losey - 1967 -

starring Dirk Bogarde, Stanley Baker, Jacqueline Sassard, Michael York, Vivien Merchant, etc.

I recorded it last night but haven't watched it yet.  Looks promising.  Good cast.

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1 hour ago, Peebs said:

I recorded it last night but haven't watched it yet.  Looks promising.  Good cast.

It's a highly unusual film.

It did receive the BAFTA Award for Best Motion Picture of 1967.

It is definitley not for everyone. 

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3 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Sorry, RAY.....

But if my chin hadn't slipped off the hand it was resting on and woke me up, I'd have missed the last TWO thirds of this "sleeper" instead of just the MIDDLE 3rd.  re: "sleeper"

Usually a term reserved for movies not expected to do well but wind up being big "hits" ( '79's BREAKING AWAY was often described like this).  But in this case, it literally fits the bill.  ;) 

Sepiatone

Believe me, I can understand your POV.

It's amazing how much of it takes place "under the surface".

 But its' negativity would be a turn-off for a lot of viewers, I think.

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This is an important scene in the film - and, yet, its' presentation seems so casual -

baker-and-york.jpg

We are being led down a very dark path.

Three men are in love with the same young woman.

And she seems to be "up for grabs".

Is the female deadlier than the male?

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Hellfighters  (1968)  -  6/10

hellfighters-movie-poster-1969-101043077

Action and romance with John Wayne as the head of a company that specializes in putting out oil well fires.An accident leads to his co-worker and friend Jim Hutton contacting Wayne's estranged daughter Katharine Ross and ex-wife Vera Miles, who left Wayne because she couldn't handle the stress of being married to a man in such a dangerous profession. Wayne and Miles are therefore stunned when Hutton and Ross fall for each other and quickly get married, insuring that the younger couple will face the same situations. Also featuring Jay C. Flippen, Bruce Cabot, Edward Faulkner, Barbara Stuart, Edmund Hashim, and Alan Caillou. This isn't awful, and the firefighting scenes are interesting, but the melodrama aspects are tired and dull. I always like seeing Jay C. Flippen, even if this is one of his wheelchair roles after losing a leg to diabetes complications. Ross reportedly battled with Wayne throughout filming due to their contrasting views on Vietnam. Outside of a handful of his early 30's films, this was the last John Wayne movie that I had not seen.

Source: MC Universal VHS

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6 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

My only beef was Toody's dumb Ooo-ooh.

It was explained in the interview in the DVD set extras with Charlotte Rae and Hank Garrett the only two surviving cast members. Joe E. Ross's (Toody's) "Ooo-ooh" is what he said when he forgot his lines, much like Curly Howard used "Nuck, nuck, nuck" for the same thing.

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