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5 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Here's how she looked, on the left, at the film's start.

MV5BYjRmNzBmZDItOGYyYy00MTBjLTk1ZjUtNzEx

So is it implied that Celia doesn't wish to marry because she plays for the other team or both teams? 

This being a pre-code I just wonder how the film implies the essence of a 'free spirit' gal.

 

  

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The Ruling Voice  (1931)  -  6/10

qQpPFwBlbg5LZe5c97V1rcjgiWp.jpg

Drama with Walter Huston as a rich and powerful racketeer who contemplates leaving the rackets to save his daughter (Loretta Young) from the social stigma. Also featuring David Manner as Dick Cheney, Dudley Digges, Doris Kenyon, John Halliday, Francis McDonald, Charles Middleton, and Nat Pendleton. This was well-worn material even at the time, but the acting is decent, and there's the unintended humor of people referring to "Dick Cheney" a lot.

Source: TCM

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2 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

So is it implied that Celia doesn't wish to marry because she plays for the other team or both teams? 

This being a pre-code I just wonder how the film implies the essence of a 'free spirit' gal.  

It doesn't say anything explicitly, of course, but her dress and manner are meant to show that she's turned her back on conventional norms as far as the woman's place. Naturally, she changes her ways by film's end.

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8 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

YES!

CHARLY is a film I would site as an example of how LOUD, INTRUSIVE DIRECTION can ruin a film, when someone is in love with their own style and wants to pull off a lot of visual tricks and cram everything they know about a camera lens into 120 minutes whether its called for or not.

ROBERTSON is terrific, but it should be noted he ran an extremely aggressive campaign to win BEST ACTOR, I personally feel like his performance is eclipsed by all the RAVI SHANKAR MUSIC and GROOVY VISUALS.

 

23 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

CHARLY (1968) *Score: 2.5/5*

Starring: Cliff Robertson, Claire Bloom, Lilia Skala, Leon Janney, Ruth White, Dick Van Patten. 

Dramatic film based on the 1959 novel by Daniel Keyes (then entitled "Flowers for Algernon"), about a young, mentally disabled man and the scientific studies he's engaged in. A group of scientists and psychologists start doing tests on Charly, in an attempt to increase his IQ. This has been on my list for a while, and I finally watched it, but I think I had too high of expectations. I thought Claire Bloom could save this, but i don't think she has that much power. I think a lot of my dislike for this stemmed from the weird camera work. The split screen effect really got old. 

Related image

i remember thinking that the first part of the film was really quite touching, with lovely work from Robertson and Bloom, and then in came the split screen, flashy colors, and a bit of a clinical feel to cool everything down. I don't think the leads can be faulted but it jjust seems like the movie was trying to go for the youthful crowds, and judging from Thomas Crown Affair the same year as well, split screen must have been a brief fad at the time.

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53 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Mackaill and her mannish appearance?   I find that hard to believe.   I'll have to check that out.

Safe_in_Hell_Dorothy_Mackaill.jpg

 

This is from Safe in Hell, yes? I know you are not suggesting otherwise, just a mention on my part.

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Sherlock Holmes  (1932)  -  5/10

sherlock_holmes_19322.jpg

Mystery/thriller based on William Gillette's play rather than any of Doyle's works. Sherlock Holmes (Clive Brook) has retired from detective work after successfully seeing his arch-nemesis Moriarty (Ernest Torrence) arrested, convicted and sentenced to death. Now Holmes is soon to be married to his sweetheart Alice Faulkner (Miriam Jordan), only for Moriarty to escape from prison and undertake an elaborate revenge plot. Also featuring Reginald Owen as Dr. Watson, Alan Mowbray, Herbert Mundin, Stanley Fields, C. Montague Shaw, and Howard Shaw as "Little Billy". As anyone familiar with the traditional Holmes works can tell by that description, this has little in common with the written works. Watson is barely in it, with Holmes being assisted more by a little kid sidekick. There is some interesting editing used, but overall the film was a miss for me. Brook had previously played Holmes in 1929's The Return of Sherlock Holmes, just to make things confusing.

Source: internet

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The Stepford Wives (1975)

Source: DVD

The title has entered almost everybody's frame of mind and the poster really just gives the secret away, so I knew going in exactly what would end up happening. As a result, while it doesn't shock, it does serve as some modern form of Greek tragedy. 

You know exactly what will happen to the empathetic leads, the vulnerable Joanna (Katherine Ross) and the brassy, spunky Bobby (Paula Prentiss), and you wish to warn them to the dangers ahead, but nothing can alter the course of what happens. Stepford is one of those places, that underneath its beautiful surface, is like a mousetrap. There is no way out of this place, and that gives it a tragic pull.

In this case, a story that already has a sad, creepy fascination
 (and some parallels with the bizarre state of modern living) is enhanced by the soulful work from both leading ladies (especially Prentiss who is simply heartbreaking), and fine eerie support from Tina Louise and Nanette Newman, to say nothing of a hairraising turn from Patrick O'Neal, and a musical score that can switch from tranquil to cacophonous on the turn of a dime.

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7 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Nevada  (1927)  -  6/10

Nevada-1927.jpg

Silent western starring Gary Cooper as Nevada, a gunfighter who is tired of run-ins with law, so he and his pal take jobs on the cattle ranch of Ben Ide (Philip Strange). Nevada draws the romantic attention of Ide's daughter Hettie (Thelma Todd), which in turn draws the ire of ranch foreman Dillon (William Powell). Also featuring Ernie Adams, Christian J. Frank, Ivan Christy, and Guy Oliver. This is worth seeing for the cast, but the story is very creaky, and none of the set-ups are very exciting. The director was John Waters, but I'm guessing not that John Waters.

Source: internet

I was just at a Thelma Todd anniversary tribute in Lawrence, Mass., her birthplace, and saw the poster for this film.  Although a number of her films were shown,  this one wasn't.  The focus was on mostly comedies.  I had assumed Nevada was lost, but I guess it's available.  I'm always interested in seeing early Cooper.

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3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Flirting Widow  (1930)  -  6/10

4AywCBYAa8KpfIaEOu1MdeWnUAy.jpg

Romantic comedy starring Dorothy Mackaill as free-spirit Celia. Her father (Claude Gillingwater) won't let Celia's younger sister Evelyn (Leila Hyams) get married until Celia is married, something the older girl has no intention of doing. However, to help out her sister, Celia fakes a marriage to a fictitious army officer stationed overseas. After Evelyn is married, Celia learns that her "beloved" has "died", a fiction that Celia herself invented. Things get complicated when a letter that Celia wrote to her "lover", which she meant to throw away, is actually mailed by an unsuspecting servant, making its way to an actual army officer (Basil Rathbone), who is amused by it enough to seek Celia out. Also featuring William Austion, Emily Fitzroy, Flora Bramley, and Anthony Bushell. Mackaill is good, and her "mannish" appearance early on in the film ads some unsaid detail to her character. 

Source: TCM

Was this on TCM On Demand?  It's an early Basil Rathbone picture that I've never seen.

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1 hour ago, laffite said:

This is from Safe in Hell, yes? I know you are not suggesting otherwise, just a mention on my part.

Yes,  that photo is from Safe in Hell.   I just posted it since I remembered it as racy and where she looks very feminine.

 

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1 minute ago, rosebette said:

Was this on TCM On Demand?  It's an early Basil Rathbone picture that I've never seen.

It was recorded off of the channel some years ago. According to MovieCollectorOH's database, it hasn't been on since 2015.

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I watched An American Tragedy (1931) on Sunday.  I had been looking forward to this version because I had heard it was closer to Dreiser's novel than A Place in the Sun.  While the filmmaking was obviously dated, I thought it was more realistic than the more well-known "classic" version.  I think we are blinded by Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift's beauty in the later version and that tends to blur the issues of the hero's moral responsibility.  It is pretty clear from the beginning of the 1931 version that the Philips Holmes character is both opportunistic (as a bellboy, leaving the hotel door unlocked when he notices a wealthy hotel patron takes a fancy to him) and unwilling to take moral responsibility (running away after he and his friends are involved in the hit and run death of a child).  Sylvia Sidney is much more attractive and sympathetic than Shelley Winters, and Holmes'/Clyde's character's behavior is even more reprehensible than Clift's.  He basically manipulates her into sleeping with him (whereas the motives of Clift and Winters are loneliness) and then ignores her once she becomes pregnant.  While there are a few brief love scenes with the wealthy girl, there are more scenes with him socializing and partying with the upper class set; there is not the sense of a powerful and ill-starred love at first sight, as with Elizabeth Taylor.  The class motive is uppermost.  And once he's arrested, you never see the rich girl again.   His plotting of the pregnant girl's death is very clear and his moral culpability in the drowning is not glossed over.  He actually swims in the other direction when she goes under.  I find Holmes a rather impassive actor, which perhaps fit the colder aspects of his character.  Toward the end of the film, particularly at the trial, his voice is almost whiny; he's basically a morally weak character who aspires to be a social climber and things have fallen apart for him.  While it's not a great film, I found it in some ways more authentic than A Place in the Sun.   

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20 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

It was recorded off of the channel some years ago. According to MovieCollectorOH's database, it hasn't been on since 2015.

Perhaps they'll have it when they a Basil Rathbone day, which I think has happened only once.  

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Living on Velvet -- After a rather promising start with the airplane crash and later scenes of aerial stunts, this turned into another Kay Francis soaper.  Throughout, George Brent is kind of a flake -- as a user review noted, "what kind of **** takes 3 people up in a plane without gas."  There is some humor -- the donut dunking scene and a delightful scene in which Brent tries to get her to say rhymes with the word "r" in them.  The scene when she sends him out to get the electricity turned on and pick up some groceries remind me of similar incidents with my husband.  However, unlike my hubs who is capable in most areas of life, Brent drifts from one thing to another while Francis wrings her hands over her inability to "save him."  (Nowadays this is called a codependent relationship.)  However, her fantastic wardrobe makes this all worthwhile.   In one scene, she has a black hat with feathers which I think are about the wingspan of the heron that lands in my neighborhood pond.  Watching her wearing that hat while getting into the elevator with Warren William is worth the price of admission.  I have a major girl crush of Francis, so the white backless dress she wears at the party (she has the most beautiful back) when she hears of Brent's car accident really got me excited.  Of course, she managed to pull a black coat with a white ermine collar over it so she could ride out to the scene of the wreck (no old trenchcoat for Kay).  *Spoiler alert* I was disappointed that she ended up with Brent; I had hoped William, who now that the pre-code days were over, was playing decent chap, would get the girl.  But the liner notes on the TCM write-up say that his contract was up, so the undeserving Brent got Kay.

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27 minutes ago, rosebette said:

I watched An American Tragedy (1931) on Sunday.  I had been looking forward to this version because I had heard it was closer to Dreiser's novel than A Place in the Sun.  While the filmmaking was obviously dated, I thought it was more realistic than the more well-known "classic" version.  I think we are blinded by Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift's beauty in the later version and that tends to blur the issues of the hero's moral responsibility.  It is pretty clear from the beginning of the 1931 version that the Philips Holmes character is both opportunistic (as a bellboy, leaving the hotel door unlocked when he notices a wealthy hotel patron takes a fancy to him) and unwilling to take moral responsibility (running away after he and his friends are involved in the hit and run death of a child).  Sylvia Sidney is much more attractive and sympathetic than Shelley Winters, and Holmes'/Clyde's character's behavior is even more reprehensible than Clift's.  He basically manipulates her into sleeping with him (whereas the motives of Clift and Winters are loneliness) and then ignores her once she becomes pregnant.  While there are a few brief love scenes with the wealthy girl, there are more scenes with him socializing and partying with the upper class set; there is not the sense of a powerful and ill-starred love at first sight, as with Elizabeth Taylor.  The class motive is uppermost.  And once he's arrested, you never see the rich girl again.   His plotting of the pregnant girl's death is very clear and his moral culpability in the drowning is not glossed over.  He actually swims in the other direction when she goes under.  I find Holmes a rather impassive actor, which perhaps fit the colder aspects of his character.  Toward the end of the film, particularly at the trial, his voice is almost whiny; he's basically a morally weak character who aspires to be a social climber and things have fallen apart for him.  While it's not a great film, I found it in some ways more authentic than A Place in the Sun.   

Nice write up and comparison. I like your comment about the potential distracting element of glorified and pretty-faced Hollywood leads to undermine the story.

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2 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

and judging from Thomas Crown Affair the same year as well, split screen must have been a brief fad at the time.

Its used in Neo Noir Marlowe (1969) also.

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1 hour ago, CinemaInternational said:

The Stepford Wives (1975)

Source: DVD

The title has entered almost everybody's frame of mind and the poster really just gives the secret away, so I knew going in exactly what would end up happening. As a result, while it doesn't shock, it does serve as some modern form of Greek tragedy. 

You know exactly what will happen to the empathetic leads, the vulnerable Joanna (Katherine Ross) and the brassy, spunky Bobby (Paula Prentiss), and you wish to warn them to the dangers ahead, but nothing can alter the course of what happens. Stepford is one of those places, that underneath its beautiful surface, is like a mousetrap. There is no way out of this place, and that gives it a tragic pull.

In this case, a story that already has a sad, creepy fascination
 (and some parallels with the bizarre state of modern living) is enhanced by the soulful work from both leading ladies (especially Prentiss who is simply heartbreaking), and fine eerie support from Tina Louise and Nanette Newman, to say nothing of a hairraising turn from Patrick O'Neal, and a musical score that can switch from tranquil to cacophonous on the turn of a dime.

I love The Stepford Wives! It's one of those fun, slightly strange 1970s sci-fi/horror films.  I thought that this film would make a great double feature with Burnt Offerings

"How could you do a thing like that? I thought we were friends!" 

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Deathmaster  (1972)  -  5/10

MV5BZmRhMzBmMzQtODk4Yy00YmUzLWI4MWQtOWQ2

After starring in the two Count Yorga movies, Robert Quarry once again played a vampire in this time-capsule horror outing from AIP and director Ray Danton. A group of hippies hang out with a bunch of bikers at an old mansion and most of them fall under the guru-like spell of stranger Khorda (Robert Quarry). Featuring John Fiedler as a helpful shopkeeper, Bill Ewing as the hero with Geronimo hair, Brenda Dickson, Bobby Pickett, William Jordan, Betty Anne Rees, and LaSesne Hilton. This is very ridiculous, but very mild for the time, so those with more delicate sensibilities can still enjoy the cheese flavoring.

Source: retrOmedia DVD

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cap-2.jpg

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Don't Torture a Duckling  (1972)  -  7/10

220px-Don'tTortureaDuckling.jpg

Italian giallo thriller about a small town being rocked by a series of murders targeting young boys. The tragedies impact the lives of several residents, including a reporter (Tomas Milian), a crazy Gypsy woman living in the woods and believed to be a witch (Florinda Bolkan), a young priest (Marc Porel), and a famous model (Barbara Bouchet) hiding out from a drug scandal. Also featuring Irene Papas, Georges Wilson, and Ugo D'Alessio. This was the film that first brought attention to genre favorite Lucio Fulci. It's one of the better giallo films that I've seen, and it was extremely controversial at the time of its release due to the graphic violence and criticism of social institutions. Florinda Bolkan gets to tear into her role, and she gets the film's most memorable scene, one that would have been pretty harrowing if not for the primitive make-up effects utilized. Fans of Barbara Bouchet will certainly want to seek this out, as well.

Source: Anchor Bay DVD

dont-torture-a-duckling-movie.png

dont+torture+a+duckling+a.jpg

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6 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Here's how she looked, on the left, at the film's start.

MV5BYjRmNzBmZDItOGYyYy00MTBjLTk1ZjUtNzEx

That reminds me very strongly of this picture:

YldK6XQ.png

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all apologies to RAYBAN, he posted a review of this movie and I have gone back to try and read it (I hadn't finished watching when it was was posted, so i did not read it) and I CAN'T FIND IT. It's probably right in front of me, sometimes on these scrolling sites, something can be right the hell in front of me and i miss it.

anyhoo, i turned on TCM the other morning just to have some white noise on while i got my coffee and my **** together. and SWANN IN LOVE (1984) was on...it's a FRENCH LANGUAGE adaptation of part of MARCEL PROUST'S REMEMBRANCE OF THINGS PAST.

95zIS4eWiJHEYWsmOeYoHRUVWkl.jpg

I DID NOT EXPECT TO GET INTO IT at all, but then I look up from my phone to see IRONS' character finger-banging a cattleya orchid corsage atop ORNELLA MUTI'S healthy decollotage and I decided I needed to go back and watch this thing from the beginning.

i'm glad i did.

I had a hard time getting past the fact that JEREMY IRONS' marvelous KARLOFFIAN VOICE was dubbed by that of another actor, he is still marvelous in his part; at several points he wears a monocle and looks like a sexy cousin of COUNT VON COUNT. He was, I'm sure, annoyed to be dubbed, but he makes up for it by doing some MARVELOUS things WITH HIS FACE.

Slightly off-topic- but this movie really got me wondering just why exactly it was that IRONS fell off the map after finally winning BEST ACTOR after several overlooked performances in the 80's. I can only chalk it up to he must be really difficult or really eccentric or a heady mix of the two. Nonetheless, I can think of scores of movies made in the last three decades that would've benefited from his presence immensely.

ITALIAN HUMAN/CAT HYBRID ORNELLA MUTI is in this, I knew her from OSCAR and FLASH GORDON and have worshiped at her feet since I was a child. She is SUCH A TOTAL MOVIE STAR. She is also dubbed, and it's a rare case of an ACTRESS being so beautiful, I have no idea if she's any good or not in the role- it doesn't really matter BECAUSE YOU CANNOT LOOK AWAY FROM HER.

I wonder if they lured her to the set each morning with a crystal dish of FANCY FEAST with a sprig of parsely atop it...

ALAIN DELON is terrific in a very small almost non sequitor part, nonetheless, the film benefits from his presence and he has a marvelous scene where he spurns a lover so artfully, i really want to go back and get a quote of what he says in case i ever need to use it.

it's a GORGEOUS FILM with METHODICAL PERIOD DETAIL and some great cinematography- the FLORIST BUDGET MUST'VE BEEN HUGE! There are PALMS and ORCHIDS and ferns and hothouse lillies filling every nook and cranny- all in pristine shape...I especially loved the LANGUID conservatory in the background of MUTI'S apartment. 

this movie would make a GREAT COMPANION PIECE TO THE AGE OF INNOCENCE (1993)- they are very very similar in many ways, only this one has multiple topless scenes.

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One-Armed Boxer  (1972)  -  7/10

53888.jpg

Hong Kong martial arts extravaganza starring and directed by Jimmy Wang Yu. He plays Yu Lung, a master student at a martial arts academy. His school and another get into a bitter rivalry that escalates into tragedy, as many are killed and Yu is left with one of his arms severed. He trains to regain his skills and seek revenge. This is generic martial arts movie plot #3, and there aren't many surprises from the plot, but the characters are incredibly outrageous, from one guy who has vampire fangs for no discernible reason, to another guy who can puff himself up to twice his normal size. Incredibly silly, but also very fun and entertaining.

Source: Shout Factory DVD

 

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18 hours ago, rosebette said:

I watched An American Tragedy (1931) on Sunday.  I had been looking forward to this version because I had heard it was closer to Dreiser's novel than A Place in the Sun.  While the filmmaking was obviously dated, I thought it was more realistic than the more well-known "classic" version.  I think we are blinded by Elizabeth Taylor and Montgomery Clift's beauty in the later version and that tends to blur the issues of the hero's moral responsibility.  It is pretty clear from the beginning of the 1931 version that the Philips Holmes character is both opportunistic (as a bellboy, leaving the hotel door unlocked when he notices a wealthy hotel patron takes a fancy to him) and unwilling to take moral responsibility (running away after he and his friends are involved in the hit and run death of a child).  Sylvia Sidney is much more attractive and sympathetic than Shelley Winters, and Holmes'/Clyde's character's behavior is even more reprehensible than Clift's.  He basically manipulates her into sleeping with him (whereas the motives of Clift and Winters are loneliness) and then ignores her once she becomes pregnant.  While there are a few brief love scenes with the wealthy girl, there are more scenes with him socializing and partying with the upper class set; there is not the sense of a powerful and ill-starred love at first sight, as with Elizabeth Taylor.  The class motive is uppermost.  And once he's arrested, you never see the rich girl again.   His plotting of the pregnant girl's death is very clear and his moral culpability in the drowning is not glossed over.  He actually swims in the other direction when she goes under.  I find Holmes a rather impassive actor, which perhaps fit the colder aspects of his character.  Toward the end of the film, particularly at the trial, his voice is almost whiny; he's basically a morally weak character who aspires to be a social climber and things have fallen apart for him.  While it's not a great film, I found it in some ways more authentic than A Place in the Sun.   

Great write-up, thank you. The film is definitely closer to Dreiser's novel (which I recommend reading) and I do prefer it to A Place in the Sun. However, both films suffer from ridiculous courtroom theatrics; a near fist fight between lawyers Charles Middleton and Irving Pichel in the first version, and Raymond Burr's over the top prosecution in the second.

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ITALIAN HUMAN/CAT HYBRID ORNELLA MUTI is in this, I knew her from OSCAR and FLASH GORDON and have worshiped at her feet since I was a child.

Agree!!!!

Image result for ornella muti flash gordon sexy images

Image result for ornella muti flash gordon sexy images

Related image

 

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The Passing of the Third Floor Back  (1935)  -  7/10

MV5BZDkwY2IzNGUtOTdiYy00YWU1LTg5ZmQtZDVk

Unusual British drama with Conrad Veidt as a mysterious new boarder at a rooming house filled with miserable people. His quiet benevolence seems to make their lives a bit better, but forces conspire to undermine their new happiness. Featuring Rene Ray, Anna Lee, Frank Cellier, John Turnbull, Cathleen Nesbitt, and Sara Allgood. The religious allegory is blatant, with Veidt an offbeat but compelling Christ figure. 

Source: internet

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