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speedracer5

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2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I only recorded The Uninvited.  I'm guessing Hussey was chosen over Roman because she has some more well-known and familiar films on her resume.  I was rooting for Roman too, because she had more films that I hadn't seen.  Oh well, people like to vote for what is familiar. 

I thought I'd recorded more of Hussey's films, but apparently that was for today--Melvyn Douglas day. I recorded There's That Woman Again and Mary Burns, Fugitive. 

I think Mary Burns is a premiere. Have nothing really against Ruth Hussey, but she's never made much of an impression in the few films I've seen her in (as a supporting player). Just steamed Roman lost. She starred in some good noirs over the years. (and a few classics as a lead-Champion; Strangers on a Train)

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35 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I think Mary Burns is a premiere. Have nothing really against Ruth Hussey, but she's never made much of an impression in the few films I've seen her in (as a supporting player). Just steamed Roman lost. She starred in some good noirs over the years. (and a few classics as a lead-Champion; Strangers on a Train)

I really can't remember Hussey in anything, except for her turn in A Philadelphia Story.  All I remember her doing in that film is pining after James Stewart.

To be honest though, I think that might be the only Ruth Hussey film that I've seen.  Well I take that back, I've also seen The Facts of Life and Tender Comrade, but I really cannot remember her in either film. 

I wanted Roman to win so I could see some of her noir. 

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The Window  (1949)  -  8/10

220px-The_window_1949.jpg

This movie has been discussed a lot on here, so I won't go into anything more, but I finally got around to watching it, and really enjoyed. A solid, well-made treat. Recommended.

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57 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I really can't remember Hussey in anything, except for her turn in A Philadelphia Story.  All I remember her doing in that film is pining after James Stewart.

To be honest though, I think that might be the only Ruth Hussey film that I've seen.  Well I take that back, I've also seen The Facts of Life and Tender Comrade, but I really cannot remember her in either film. 

I wanted Roman to win so I could see some of her noir. 

I bet you've seen "Another Thin Man".

Ruth Hussey plays a small but pivotal role as the Charles' vacation baby nurse.

I think "The Uninvited " is the most impressive thing I've ever seen her in and she was quite adequate but not all that impressive.

"The Uninvited" is such an enchanting, scary, mysterious treat-- whatever you want to call it--

that almost anybody would look good in that part. But Hussey more than adequately fulfills the requirements on an above average level.

For years people like me campaigned to have it put on DVD.

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Has Vera Miles ever had any sort of tribute?  I had recently mentioned her in a "Back Street" post, one of the all time great b**** roles.

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9 minutes ago, RoyCronin said:

Has Vera Miles ever had any sort of tribute?  I had recently mentioned her in a "Back Street" post, one of the all time great b**** roles.

No, I don't think so. Maybe a pair of prime time movies. She's still with us too. Yes, loved her in that film!

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1 hour ago, RoyCronin said:

Has Vera Miles ever had any sort of tribute?  I had recently mentioned her in a "Back Street" post, one of the all time great b**** roles.

Yes;   Miles was feature for a day in SUTS.

 

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23 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Marketa Lazarova  (1967)  -  5/10

220px-Marketa_Lazarova_film_poster_1967_

Czech historical epic from director Frantisek Vlacil. In the Middle Ages, the members of a familial clan clashes with forces of the king and the church. Eventually Marketa Lazarova (Magda Vasaryova), the young daughter of the clan leader, is kidnapped by Mikolas (Frantisek Velecky) in retaliation of past wrongs, but the two fall in love. Considered by many the greatest Czech film ever made, I was sorely disappointed, finding it boring, too remote, and difficult to care about anyone or anything going on. The post-sync dialogue, the rapid shifts in narrative chronology, the extremely intrusive music, and the repeated use of point-of-view cinematography for no apparent advantage all further made this a chore to sit through for nearly three hours. However, I can't deny the B&W beauty of the snowy locations. 

Source: The Criterion Channel

Marketa-2.jpg

 

Lawrence, that still suggests that the director was trying to channel Kurosawa. Imagine Toshiro Mifune and a Japanese actress instead of the Czech actors.

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El hombre sin rostro aka The Man Without a Face  (1950)  -  6/10

facelessman03.jpg

Mexican psychological suspense thriller/horror film from writer-director Juan Bustillo Oro. Arturo de Cordova stars as police detective Juan Carlos Lozano, who is on the case of a serial murderer targeting women. He keeps having horrifying dreams wherein his mother admonishes him to capture the killer, a figure that has no face, at least in his dreams. With Carmen Molina, Miguel Angel Ferriz, and Queta Lavat. The dream sequences are very well done, and de Cordova gets to exercise his thespian skills quite a bit more than I'm used to seeing him do. The pop-psychology underpinnings of the story are a bit too obvious to leave much suspense, unfortunately. 

Source: internet

8oww3vuJzQRllenVEouMWrlp3yn.jpg

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Les Enfants Terribles  (1950)  -  7/10

Les+Enfants+Terribles+18.jpg

French drama directed by Jean-Pierre Melville, based on the book by Jean Cocteau. Cocteau also wrote the script, provides narration, and even directed a few scenes. The film follows brother and sister Paul (Edouard Dermithe) and Elisabeth (Nicole Stephane) and their close, combative, unusual relationship pushes away those around them. Featuring Renee Cosima, Jacques Bernard, Melvyn Martin, and Jean-Marie Robain. There's an air of sophisticated decadence about the proceedings, but there's also a theatricality that I found off-putting. Dermithe looks striking, but he's a weak actor, while Stephane, who had co-starred in Melville's previous film La Silence de la mer where she had virtually no dialogue, is very good here, with tons of dialogue. While I liked this well enough, I would still rank as my least favorite film by either Melville or Cocteau, both filmmakers that I generally like a lot.

Source: The Criterion Channel

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Waterfront Women  (1950)  -  6/10

52833_1_front.jpg

British drama starring Robert Newton as a hard-drinking ship's engineer who has been at sea and away from his family for many years. His now grown daughters resent him, and his son has never met him. One of his girls, Nora (Avis Scott), is in love with a sailor herself, another ship's engineer named Ben (Richard Burton), who has been out of work for a long time. Also featuring Susan Shaw as the eldest daughter who's hoping to marry a "quality gentleman" but who fears her father's rep will make that impossible, Kathleen Harrison as the long-suffering wife and mother, Robin Netscher, Kenneth Griffith, Olive Sloane, James Hayter, and Hattie Jacques. Newton is typecast, Burton is decent in an underwritten role, and both Shaw and Scott acquit themselves well. There's also some nice and dreary "kitchen sink" realism.

Source: internet

ScreenHunter_05+Sep.+12+01.25.jpg

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5 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I bet you've seen "Another Thin Man".

Ruth Hussey plays a small but pivotal role as the Charles' vacation baby nurse.

I think "The Uninvited " is the most impressive thing I've ever seen her in and she was quite adequate but not all that impressive.

"The Uninvited" is such an enchanting, scary, mysterious treat-- whatever you want to call it--

that almost anybody would look good in that part. But Hussey more than adequately fulfills the requirements on an above average level.

For years people like me campaigned to have it put on DVD.

I have seen Another Thin Man.  I cannot remember Ruth Hussey in the film.  I haven't seen this installment of the series as often though, it's my least favorite of the six films.  I find the baby party incredibly annoying. 

I am excited about The Uninvited. I look forward to seeing it.  I believe that it's on Criterion. 

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5 hours ago, RoyCronin said:

Has Vera Miles ever had any sort of tribute?  I had recently mentioned her in a "Back Street" post, one of the all time great b**** roles.

Vera Miles also plays a great "b" in Autumn Leaves with Joan Crawford and Cliff Robertson. 

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Les Enfants Terribles  (1950)  -  7/10

Les+Enfants+Terribles+18.jpg

French drama directed by Jean-Pierre Melville, based on the book by Jean Cocteau. Cocteau also wrote the script, provides narration, and even directed a few scenes. The film follows brother and sister Paul (Edouard Dermithe) and Elisabeth (Nicole Stephane) and their close, combative, unusual relationship pushes away those around them. Featuring Renee Cosima, Jacques Bernard, Melvyn Martin, and Jean-Marie Robain. There's an air of sophisticated decadence about the proceedings, but there's also a theatricality that I found off-putting. Dermithe looks striking, but he's a weak actor, while Stephane, who had co-starred in Melville's previous film La Silence de la mer where she had virtually no dialogue, is very good here, with tons of dialogue. While I liked this well enough, I would still rank as my least favorite film by either Melville or Cocteau, both filmmakers that I generally like a lot.

Source: The Criterion Channel

totally agree my least favorite film by either Melville or Cocteau

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Checked out MARY BURNS, FUGITIVE (1935)- the TCM Premiere of an old Paramount film starring Sylvia Sydney...After a promising start, it ended up being no great shakes.

5b2779505d541.jpg

still, SYDNEY was an interesting actress with a very unusual look- almost like a beautiful insect.

The stand out of this production was probably the sets, which managed to be much more interesting at times than the story. There was an absolutely adorable little coffee shop that was like something out of a Disney movie, a hospital with a recessed window seat, and one of those 1930s country cottages with railings made from rustic timber and a fire roaring in a floor-to-ceiling stone hearth.

edit- this is sort of a HAYES CODE retelling of THE STORY OF TEMPLE DRAKE...AND in many ways the overall story and the performance and "look" of SYLVIA SYDNEY reminds me in many ways of the SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS (1937)

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"The Shining Hour" - Frank Borzage - 1938 -

starring Joan Crawford, Robert Young, Margaret Sullivan, Melvyn Douglas, etc.

essentially, this film is a soap-opera -

but the director doesn't embrace the genre's conventions -

instead, he turns it into a somber romantic melodrama -

I don't want to reveal the plot's details -

but the love lives of the characters, meant to go one way, quite sudddenly, go another way -

there's a lot of suffering - mentally, emotionally, domestically -

and there's a wicked witch in the middle of it all -

the film has two unforgettable sequences -

the burning of the main couple's newly-built home -

by - you won't believe it -

and the attempted rape of Crawford's character -

by - you won't believe it -

in the end, well, you might not believe it, either -

the distinguished cast does have a ball, though -

Crawford's character is the best - she's been around the block, at least twice -

the-shining-hour-1938-frank-borzage-joan

 

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11 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Les Enfants Terribles  (1950)  -  7/10

Les+Enfants+Terribles+18.jpg

French drama directed by Jean-Pierre Melville, based on the book by Jean Cocteau. Cocteau also wrote the script, provides narration, and even directed a few scenes. The film follows brother and sister Paul (Edouard Dermithe) and Elisabeth (Nicole Stephane) and their close, combative, unusual relationship pushes away those around them. Featuring Renee Cosima, Jacques Bernard, Melvyn Martin, and Jean-Marie Robain. There's an air of sophisticated decadence about the proceedings, but there's also a theatricality that I found off-putting. Dermithe looks striking, but he's a weak actor, while Stephane, who had co-starred in Melville's previous film La Silence de la mer where she had virtually no dialogue, is very good here, with tons of dialogue. While I liked this well enough, I would still rank as my least favorite film by either Melville or Cocteau, both filmmakers that I generally like a lot.

Source: The Criterion Channel

I have to confess -I love this film.

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13 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

she had virtually no dialogue, is very good here, with tons of dialogue.  [ Les Enfants Terrible ]

If I remember rightly, the whole movie had tons of dialogue. One of few movies that it is very near necessary to pause just to catch up with subtitles.

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12 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Vera Miles also plays a great "b" in Autumn Leaves with Joan Crawford and Cliff Robertson. 

Yes, that too!

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I watched two movies with Henry Fonda over the week-end:  The Long Night (1947) and Fort Apache (1948).  I had seen both of these films before, but seeing them virtually back to back (I streamed The Long Night on Saturday), I have a greater appreciation of Fonda as an actor.  The Long Night is, I believe, an underrated film, sort of film noir with an unusual narrative path -- interwoven flashbacks.  The first time I saw it was in the middle of the night, and I couldn't turn it off, despite being sleepy.  Fonda is a vet and working man, at turns charmingly boyish, vulnerable, and sincere, then angry and bitter.  Vincent Price as a slimy predator is also worth watching.  However, Fonda's character is night and day opposite to the rigid martinet in Fort Apache.  I think Fort Apache is a much more complex Western than it's given credit for, and John Wayne is also playing against the  stereotypical Wayne persona.  Wayne is the common sense man, the voice for peace and negotiation against Fonda's self-destructive hubris.  Some compare the ending to The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance; as reporters look at the memorial to his character, they talk about what a great and courageous military leader he was.  However, Wayne's response is ambiguous: "No one died more gallantly."  He acknowledges the commander's innate courage, but at the same time, leaves the tragedy of the battle unspoken -- that most of a regiment was sacrificed as a result of its commander's stubbornness.  The final triumphant military music with the images of the dead soldiers doesn't quite erase the brutal cost of  that sacrifice.

 

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14 minutes ago, rosebette said:

I watched two movies with Henry Fonda over the week-end:  The Long Night (1947) and Fort Apache (1948).    However, Fonda's character is night and day opposite to the rigid martinet in Fort Apache.  I think Fort Apache is a much more complex Western than it's given credit for, and John Wayne is also playing against the  stereotypical Wayne persona.  Wayne is the common sense man, the voice for peace and negotiation against Fonda's self-destructive hubris.  Some compare the ending to The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance; as reporters look at the memorial to his character, they talk about what a great and courageous military leader he was.  However, Wayne's response is ambiguous: "No one died more gallantly."  He acknowledges the commander's innate courage, but at the same time, leaves the tragedy of the battle unspoken -- that most of a regiment was sacrificed as a result of its commander's stubbornness.  The final triumphant military music with the images of the dead soldiers doesn't quite erase the brutal cost of  that sacrifice.

 

I agree in the comparison of the ending of Fort Apache to Liberty Valance. Like the latter film Wayne's character wanted to enhance the "legend" of what was the Custer-like military disaster of Fonda's last command, all to the glory of the regiment and, with it, Fonda's reputation. Very much a "When the legend becomes fact, print the legend" attitude.

I wonder how many viewers today would sympathize with Ford's attitude in Fort Apache. A lot of brave men died as a result of Fonda's stubbornness but that is all covered up with the help of Wayne, all so that the regiment's reputation will not be tarnished, to hell with the facts and lives lost unnecessarily. (Not to mention tough luck to the widows and children of those who died that day).

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26 minutes ago, TomJH said:

I agree in the comparison of the ending of Fort Apache to Liberty Valance. Like the latter film Wayne's character wanted to enhance the "legend" of what was the Custer-like military disaster of Fonda's last command, all to the glory of the regiment and, with it, Fonda's reputation. Very much a "When the legend becomes fact, print the legend" attitude.

I wonder how many viewers today would sympathize with Ford's attitude in Fort Apache. A lot of brave men died as a result of Fonda's stubbornness but that is all covered up with the help of Wayne, all so that the regiment's reputation will not be tarnished, to hell with the facts and lives lost unnecessarily. (Not to mention tough luck to the widows and children of those who died that day).

I couldn't help but think of those left behind, particularly as the women say farewell to their husbands and sweethearts before the regiment rides out.  The final scene at the memorial also features O' Rourke's widow (Ward Bond's character) looking on while the grandchild (both of whose grandfathers have died in the battle) play at Shirley Temple's feet.

Another aspect that grated was the lack of respect of Fonda's character toward the Indians.  Apparently, he was willing to sacrifice an entire regiment and go into battle rather than make a pact with "the redskins" who were untrustworthy, although the Indians had been betrayed by a white tradesman who was present at that meeting.   Wayne's character is respectful throughout, and Wayne shows true courage by walking toward Geronimo unarmed -- and he and those remaining survive as a result.  About the ending, my husband said, "Aren't we giving a memorial to toxic masculinity here?"  Since hubs said this, I can repeat it, otherwise someone might just say I'm some crazy feminist.  

Apparently, the Thursday character and the final massacre was loosely based on the true story of Custer and the Battle of Little Big Horn.  Interestingly, that story was highly fictionalized in They Died with their Boots On so that the character of Flynn's Custer would have the audience's sympathy (Flynn's Custer is sympathetic to the Indians and has to make a stand to protect innocent settlers).  I don't know how Ford wants us to feel about Thursday -- should we both admire him and despise him at the same time?  In any case, it's a complex film with fine performances by both leading men.

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

still, SYDNEY was an interesting actress with a very unusual look- almost like a beautiful insect.

 

I long thought she was kind of a "cutie", but insect like?  

I can't go along with that. But certainly underappreciated. 

And too, I agree.  The flick was no great shakes.  I only tuned in to see SYDNEY in something other than FURY and DEAD END.  :) 

Oh, and...  BEETLEJUICE  :D 

Sepiatone

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