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I Just Watched...

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24 minutes ago, Hibi said:

They scrapped most of the Broadway score and beefed up Skelton's part [in PANAMA HATTIE]. Ann got the leftovers....

Yes, i felt as i watched it that it seemed like a story that went through edits and rewrites and revisions and I also imagine some risque humor from the Broadway version was dropped too.

edit- oddly, the wikipedia entry for the film is practically a stub and the imdb trivia is pretty spartan too, kind of surprising.

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We watched ON THE WATERFRONT the other night during the Brando marathon. It's really the first time I've seen it from start to finish. I was surprised to hear Sinatra was originally cast as Terry Malloy. Brando was so good in the part it's hard to imagine anyone else in the role. . Lee J Cobb was great too. It's interesting that when I first read the book THE GODFATHER, before the movie was cast,  I had Cobb in my mind as Vito Corleone. 

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Botany Bay  (1952)  -  6/10

MV5BMGNkMGY5ZGUtYmYxMC00ZTllLTlkY2EtNTAz

Alan Ladd stars as a doctor unjustly convicted of a crime and sentenced to the penal colony of New South Wales/Australia. The journey there is fraught with peril, as the vicious ship's captain (James Mason) is a cruel and loathsome jerk. Also featuring Patricia Medina, Jonathan Harris, Murray Matheson, Skelton Knaggs, and Cedric Hardwicke. All of the cruelty-at-sea cliches are present (floggings, keel-hauling), and Mason seems to relish his role. 

Source: internet

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4 hours ago, TomJH said:

Yeh, it's always a good feeling when John Agar dies in a movie. And if you know it's going to happen, then it's something to look forward to.

I'm wondering if John Agar rises (or falls) to the level of Pitchfork status.

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20 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Botany Bay  (1952)  -  6/10

MV5BMGNkMGY5ZGUtYmYxMC00ZTllLTlkY2EtNTAz

Alan Ladd stars as a doctor unjustly convicted of a crime and sentenced to the penal colony of New South Wales/Australia. The journey there is fraught with peril, as the vicious ship's captain (James Mason) is a cruel and loathsome jerk. Also featuring Patricia Medina, Jonathan Harris, Murray Matheson, Skelton Knaggs, and Cedric Hardwicke. All of the cruelty-at-sea cliches are present (floggings, keel-hauling), and Mason seems to relish his role. 

Source: internet

I can barely watch James Mason doing love/lust scenes. He just seems so stilted, although I do like him in other roles.

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Battle Of The Sexes (2017) 4/10

Battle of the Sexes Poster

I had high expectations for this one, Emma Stone and Steve Carell are both highly talented actors and the directors had made one of my favorite 21st century films "Little Miss Sunshine". It tells us about the events leading up to the exhibition tennis match between current female champ Billie Jean King and former male champ Bobby Riggs. 

But the writing is poor, it's soap opera with a lot of preachy "Lifetime movie" moments. Stone (as Billie Jean King) and even Carell (as Bobby Riggs) underplay their parts but they are OK. The supporting cast is mostly one dimensional characters. I recall the real match and hype that went on back in 1973 and it was a lot more fun than this movie.

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The Brigand  (1952)  -  6/10

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Anthony Dexter stars as an exiled former guard to the Moroccan king who travels to the lands of his distant cousin, who is also a king. When the dastardly Prince Ramon (Anthony Quinn) makes a bid for the throne, Dexter has to impersonate his royal cousin to thwart the plot. Also featuring Jody Lawrence, Gale Robbins, Carl Benton Reid, Ron Randell, Carleton Young, and Walter Kingsford. B-level derring-do.

Source: internet

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Hmmm. 

I just started watching the second half of MISTER ROBERTS. I remember having a real issue with this film when I saw it one time many years ago, but I had forgotten what it was.

just remembered.

When the crew gets a shlore leave, several of the men are returned by army officers for drunkenly crashing an Army social , among the details are that of the 50 young girls who were there, (daughters of the army commanders) several were “mauled”, two had black eyes, and several of them “ran off screaming into the night since having their clothes torn off “ and “hadn’t been seen since.”

Granted, I am paraphrasing from having just seen it but that’s pretty much it...Except you know that all this is played for comedy and the men are immediately allowed to leave the boat once the army officers depart.

thats ***ed up. 

That’s **** up for the year this film is set, thats ****ed up for the year this film was made, and that’s ****ed up now in 2019.

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Casque d'Or  (1952)  -  7/10

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French romance/crime drama, based on actual events, from director Jacques Becker. Simone Signoret stars as Marie, a Parisian prostitute and gangster's moll in the Belle Epoque era. When she begins an affair with a recently paroled carpenter (Serge Reggiani), it sets in motion an escalating series of violent encounters that end in scandal and tragedy. Also featuring Claude Dauphin, Raymond Bussieres, Odette Barencey, and Gaston Modot. Signoret has one of her best roles here, and she doesn't disappoint. The film's last act is a stand out. I enjoyed seeing Gaston Modot again, 22 years after starring in Luis Bunuel's L'Age d'Or.

Source: The Criterion Channel

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Face to Face  (1952)  -  6/10

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Two stories from celebrated authors, directed by John Brahm and Bretaigne Windust, respectively.

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In "The Secret Sharer" based on the work by Joseph Conrad, James Mason stars as a ship's captain given his first vessel. One night he discovers a man (Michael Pate) clinging to the ship's ladder. The man claims to have escaped from unjust captivity, and Mason decides to hide him out, but is he telling the truth? With Gene Lockhart, Sean McClory, Albert Sharpe, and Alec Harford. This was the better of the two tales, with Mason turning in a good performance.

Face-to-Face-1952-2.jpg

"The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky" based on the work by Stephen Crane stars Robert Preston as western sheriff who brings a wife (Marjorie Steele) home, only to have a face a violent drunk (Minor Watson) who has been terrorizing the citizenry during the lawman's absence. With Olive Carey, Dan Seymour, and James Agee, who also scripted this tale. That last bit may be the most memorable thing about this rather bland time-waster.

Source: YouTube

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"Almost A Bride" - Richard Wallace - 1949 -

starring Shirley Temple, David Niven, Tom Tully,  Gloria Holden, Daryl Hickman, Robert Ellis, etc .

a delightful comedy about a teenager who, due to circumstances beyond her control, finds herself the newest love interest of a disreptuable playboy -

she has to feign amnesia - and this fact gets her into the trouble -

also, the playboy who is going through his latest divorce is saddled with the girl's lawyer father who is the prosecuting attorney -

add the girl's loving boyfriend and the girl's best friend and a noisy boy neighbor -

and you have a steamy brew of comic complications -

shades of "Lolita" but the aging playboy is glad to be romancing the girl, because he thinks that her father will treat him more kindly in court -

the entire cast is having such a good time -

and you will, too 

Shirley Temple meets "Lolita" -

would you believe it? -

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also known as -

220px-A_Kiss_for_Corliss_poster.jpg

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11 hours ago, TomJH said:

Another Part of the Forest (1948)

I've a question, though, for those who have seen this film. Can anyone tell me the meaning of the title?

I'm pretty sure Another Part of the Forest is from Shakespeare.  I am not really sure what the meaning is? 

Maybe this family is so far gone that they're in another part of the forest from the rest of society? I don't really know for certain though.

I really liked this film as well.  I watched it during my Edmond O'Brien kick.  I particularly liked O'Brien and Ann Blyth's performances in this film. 

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Fanfan la Tulipe  (1952)  -  7/10

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French swashbuckling adventure comedy, with Gerard Philipe as Fanfan, a roguish lover and fighter who joins the army of King Louis XV (Marcel Herrand) to escape a forced marriage, leading to many mishaps and heroics, as well as romance with the beautiful "gypsy" Adeline (Gina Lollobrigida). Also featuring Olivier Hussenot, Henri Rollan, Nerio Bernardi, Genevieve Page, and Noel Roquevert. Directed with much flare by Christian-Jacque, this a lighthearted treat, full of action and quick-paced gags, with a charismatic performance by Philipe, and Lollobrigida at her loveliest.

Source: The Criterion Channel

 

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

I'm pretty sure Another Part of the Forest is from Shakespeare.  I am not really sure what the meaning is? 

Maybe this family is so far gone that they're in another part of the forest from the rest of society? I don't really know for certain though.

I really liked this film as well.  I watched it during my Edmond O'Brien kick.  I particularly liked O'Brien and Ann Blyth's performances in this film. 1

"Another part of the forest" is a stage direction from As You Like It. Good catch, Speedy! The application to the story is that this is another part of the story of The Little Foxes.

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On 8/6/2019 at 7:59 AM, rosebette said:

I watched two movies with Henry Fonda over the week-end:  The Long Night (1947) and Fort Apache (1948).  I had seen both of these films before, but seeing them virtually back to back (I streamed The Long Night on Saturday), I have a greater appreciation of Fonda as an actor.  The Long Night is, I believe, an underrated film, sort of film noir with an unusual narrative path -- interwoven flashbacks.  The first time I saw it was in the middle of the night, and I couldn't turn it off, despite being sleepy.  Fonda is a vet and working man, at turns charmingly boyish, vulnerable, and sincere, then angry and bitter.  Vincent Price as a slimy predator is also worth watching. 

I love The Long Night and think this remake is at least as good as, maybe even better than, the excellent French original, Le jour se leve. One of Fonda's best performances. The American remake expands the role of the innocent girl, played by Barbara Bel Geddes, and makes her involvement with the Vincent Price character more understandable, because he gives her access to the world of music and literature that she craves. The French actress, Jacqueline Laurent, is OK, but can't compare to the powerhouse trio of Jean Gabin, Arletty, and Pierre Brasseur. Ann Dvorak is also outstanding in The Long Night.

I'm with rayban in loving Les Enfants Terribles.

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The Flavor of Green Tea Over Rice  (1952)  -  7/10

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Japanese drama from director Yasujiro Ozu. Taeko (Michiyo Kigure) and Mokichi (Shin Saburi) are a well-off, middle-aged couple stuck in a marriage gone stale. They're also childless, so they find themselves taking parental roles over their grown niece Setsuko (Keiko Tsushima), who is rebelling against traditions in more ways than one. Also featuring Koji Tsuruta, Chikage Awashima, Kuniko Miyake, Eijiro Yanagi, and Chishu Ryu. I didn't warm to this as much as I have with most of Ozu's other films. Maybe it's my mood, or maybe the characters were less compelling. Most of Ozu's family dramas are about things getting better, relationships strengthened and/or grown to another stage in life. However, in this film it seems more like the collapse of relationships, the fading of love. All of which is part of life, too, but not something Ozu's films dwell on as much. The style is the same, as one would expect with Ozu's meticulous and peculiar works, and there are several frames that could stand alone as art works of geometric contrast and precision. 

Source: The Criterion Channel

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2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I'm pretty sure Another Part of the Forest is from Shakespeare.  I am not really sure what the meaning is? 

Maybe this family is so far gone that they're in another part of the forest from the rest of society? I don't really know for certain though.

I really liked this film as well.  I watched it during my Edmond O'Brien kick.  I particularly liked O'Brien and Ann Blyth's performances in this film. 

 

58 minutes ago, kingrat said:

"Another part of the forest" is a stage direction from As You Like It. Good catch, Speedy! The application to the story is that this is another part of the story of The Little Foxes.

Thanks very much, Speedy and kingrat, for pointing to Shakespeare as the original source for the title. I'm still guessing, though, what the title actually means. You made a guess at its symbolism, Speedy. Maybe you're right, it makes some sense.

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9 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

I can barely watch James Mason doing love/lust scenes. He just seems so stilted, although I do like him in other roles.

You do not like him in love scenes because he is stiff?

no . . . even I will not go there . . .

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The Importance of Being Earnest  (1952)  -  6/10

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British comedy based on Oscar Wilde's play, directed by Anthony Asquith. Two men (Michael Redgrave and Michael Dennison) both use pseudonyms in order to woo the women they love (Joan Greenwood and Dorothy Tutin, respectively). Also with Edith Evans, Margaret Rutherford, Miles Malleson, Richard Wattis, Walter Hudd, and Aubrey Mather. I just couldn't get into this. I know the play is beloved, as is this film version, but I was bored within the first 20 minutes. Yeah, I'm a philistine. 

Source: The Criterion Channel

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The play is perhaps the funniest stage comedy of all time.

The movie version is quite wonderful, too.

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8 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Importance of Being Earnest  (1952)  -  6/10

MV5BMGExZDdiMzQtMWQ0Ny00OTkyLTgyNWItMWYy

British comedy based on Oscar Wilde's play, directed by Anthony Asquith. Two men (Michael Redgrave and Michael Dennison) both use pseudonyms in order to woo the women they love (Joan Greenwood and Dorothy Tutin, respectively). Also with Edith Evans, Margaret Rutherford, Miles Malleson, Richard Wattis, Walter Hudd, and Aubrey Mather. I just couldn't get into this. I know the play is beloved, as is this film version, but I was bored within the first 20 minutes. Yeah, I'm a philistine. 

Source: The Criterion Channel

Great. Now I gotta look up philistine!

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Boogie Nights (1997) Porn Biz Noir

1997-boogie-nights-poster3.jpg

Written, produced and directed by Paul Thomas Anderson (Hard Eight (1996), There Will Be Blood (2007)). Cinematography by Robert Elswit, Music by Michael Penn.

The film stars Mark Wahlberg as Eddie Adams/"Dirk Diggler", Julianne Moore (The Big Lebowski (1998)) as Maggie/"Amber Waves," Burt Reynolds (Deliverance (1972)) as Jack Horner, Don Cheadle (Devil in a Blue Dress (1995)) as Buck Swope, John C. Reilly (Hard Eight (1996), Gangs of New York (2002)) as Reed Rothchild, William H. Macy (Fargo (1996), Hit Me (1996)) as "Little" Bill Thompson, Heather Graham as Brandy/"Rollergirl", Nicole Ari Parker as Becky Barnett, Philip Seymour Hoffman (Hard Eight (1996), The Big Lebowski (1998), Before the Devil Knows You're Dead (2007)) as Scotty J., Luis Guzmán as Maurice Rodriguez, Philip Baker Hall (Hard Eight (1996), Hit Me (1996)) as Floyd Gondolli, Thomas Jane (The Punisher (2004), Give 'em Hell Malone (2009), Dark Country (2009)) as Todd Parker, Robert Ridgely as the Colonel James, Robert Downey Sr. as Burk, Nina Hartley as "Little" Bill's wife, Melora Walters as Jessie St. Vincent, Alfred Molina as Rahad Jackson, and Ricky Jay as Kurt Longjohn.


Boogie Nights begins at the height of the "Porno Chic" Era before the "Golden Age Of Porn" began to lose its luster. The era stretched from 1969 to 1984. It was a time when sexually explicit films went mainstream, got a mentioned and joked about on late night talk shows and when even some of it's slang terns became part of the national lexicon.

"Porno Chic" Era began when leading pop artist Andy Warhol directed and released Blue Movie (1969) an artistic cut above a plain Hard Core loop, and that was followed by Mona (1970). They were the first two adult erotic films depicting explicit sex to receive wide theatrical release. Notable hits of "Porno Chic" were 1972's notorious Deep Throat starring Linda Lovelace directed by Gerard Damiano, and Behind The Green Door starring Marilyn Chambers, followed by 1973's The Devil in Miss Jones also by Damiano, and 1976's The Opening of Misty Beethoven by Radley Metzger. Warhol had once stated that Blue Movie was an influence for Brando's Last Tango In Paris (1972) an international hit that was nominated for two Academy Awards and which won seven other US and international awards.

Burt Reynolds gives one of his best performances since Deliverance. I've never cared for the majority of all his good ol' boy, corn pone shtick movies, that seemed to be his go to persona, between these two films. I'll admit maybe I missed something but that is because Burt being in a film was never a drawing card for me. I have enjoyed a few of his Westerns. Notable in the ensemble cast are, Mark Wahlberg, Julianne Moore, Heather Grahame, Don Cheadle, John C. Reilly, William H. Macy, and Ricky Jay.

The rest of the massive cast also acquit themselves admirably, they give humanity to countless similar real life Sexploitation/early Porn makers who nowadays are mostly just forgotten names on IMDb lists if the titles even show up. (Note IMDb must have a filter in their search a lot of titles will not come up when you use IMDb's search, however the links appear when you do a Google search).

For a film about the Porn Industry there is not a whole lot of nudity or sex, you have to go to the source films for that  commodity and particularly those from the vintage year of 1969 . That was the year where full frontal nudity and simulated sex first was allowed. It would be today's equivalent of and NC-17. Boogie Nights is not even a hard "R." Where in real Sexploitation  it was all about the most you could get away with, Anderson is just telling an interesting story of Bizarro Hollywood.

Anything more than the "T&A" in Boogie Nights would earn it that economically disastrous, for the box office, NC-17 rating. The prosthetic **** of Dirk isn't real, lol.

Anderson does give us a quite a bit of style, and some homages to other films. Entertaining 8/10. Fuller review with some screen caps in Film Noir Gangster.

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I watched THE SHINING HOUR (1938) yesterday.

38shining11nov15.jpg

I have to say I found it awfully goofy- but watchable, although things really spun out of control at the end.

it's one's of those clunky 1930's adaptations of stage plays where people plaintively arrange vases full of gladioli whist giving benighted, faraway, allusion-heavy monologues that no sane, sober, ACTUAL person in real life would EVER recite...(it's produced by JOSEPH L MANKIEWICZ, so, natch)

I don't think there's a natural moment in the whole thing.

I'm not sure what's going on with JOAN'S GAUCHO PANTS (?) in the above photo.

Thank God CRAWFORD found her home at WARNER'S in the mid-forties, because outside of SADIE McKEE and GRAND HOTEL, they really put her in some junk.

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6 hours ago, rayban said:

The play is perhaps the funniest stage comedy of all time.

The movie version is quite wonderful, too.

You have probably seen the BBC TV version made in 1976. Funnier than the movie. Also on the disc is "The Picture of Dorian Gray" with John Gielgud, Jeremy Brett, and Peter Firth. These were "Play of the Month" offerings, that famed television series in England. The cast of Earnest are names not so well known to me today (they were excellent) though I (we) know Joan Plowright, who played Lady Bracknell. She looked a little young and I was worried about her for awhile but she ended up acquitting herself well enough. But (sorry, Joan) she is no Edith Evans, who I feel, as Lady Bracknell, is the most brilliantly cast actress in any role in the history of everything. If a pedestrian word could be ever be famous, she would get the prize for intoning the word "handbag" with just the right aristocratic dismay. I am old enough to be able to crack my voice just as she did and its too bad I can't send an audio link because my handbag imitation is spot on. :lol:

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