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43 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

yes please. I love Louisiana Cajun cookin'.

Every now and then, I will defiantly pick a nickname for a movie and insist on calling it by that (admittedly stupid) nickname instead of its proper title. MOGAMBO (the movie) is so goofy, I just can’t resist. 

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I agree so much that Ava should have done her singing in Showboat, ever since I saw That's Entertainment Part 52 or whatever number it was.

Lena Horne's commentary was so sad, I still tear up re-watching.

Agree also that Iguana was such a wonderful, fabulous performance, how did she not win every award?

There was a documentary some time ago about Ava where she says something like a lot of us couldn't act, but we looked damned good on the screen.

I love Ava.

 

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Across the Bridge  (1957)  -  6/10

220px-Across_the_Bridge_FilmPoster.jpeg

British thriller with Rod Steiger as a big-money embezzler at a major British financial firm. He happens to be in the U.S. when the story breaks, so he tries to make it south to Mexico. He switches identities with another man on the train, only to create even more complications for himself. Also featuring Bernard Lee, David Knight, Noel Willman, Marla Landi, Eric Pohlmann, Alan Gifford, and Dolores the dog. Director Ken Annakin considered this his finest work, and Steiger is said to have considered this one of his own favorite films. However, I couldn't really get past the many absurd coincidences in the story. Steiger's character is German by birth, so he uses a German accent. Although the film is set in the US and Mexico, it was filmed entirely in the UK and Spain.

Source: internet

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13 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The Red Balloon  (1956)  -  9/10

redballoon613x463.jpg

French short film from writer-director Albert Lamorisse. A young boy (Pascal Lamorisse) gets a red balloon that follows him around like a puppy dog and obeys his commands. This simple, sweet fantasy is very amusing and ingeniously executed. It won the 1957 Oscar for Best Original Screenplay. Highly recommended.

Source: The Criterion Channel

I always found it a vague and puzzling film.  But( and as I often mentioned in these forums) for some reason a local station would show this film after the local J.L. Hudson Thanksgiving day parade back in the '60's.  By the early '70's they quit showing it.  And when I saw a VHS copy available somewhere, I picked it up(for old time's sake)  And despite it's ambiguity of point( to me), I still enjoy looking at it every now and then. 

OK----

There also was some short mention of the old "Starman" Japanese flicks up there.  At another time here I pointed out that I'd see some of those when I'd come home from the afternoon shift when I started working at GM( '71).  When the '84 STARMAN with JEFF BRIDGES came out, I just HAD to go see it and what they did with the notion.  I was sort of apprehensive but too, a bit disappointed it had NO connection to the idea behind those Japanese flicks!  ;) 

Sepiatone

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

MGfreakinM. 

Louis B Mayer’s obsession with every last aspect of a film being fine-tuned to perfection- from the colors, to the visuals to his general idea of what life in America was supposed to be. I’m sure since Ava’s voice wasn’t pitch perfect and possessing a range of whoever they dubbed her with was a factor, but to be honest Ava’s natural, beautiful but not perfect, voice and reading of the song is what they should’ve used. It makes sense for the character and it makes sense for Ava

The sense of hyper perfection sometimes works, for the most part, I do not have a lot of interest in 40s and 50s MGM films. 

I like a lot of the 40s-50s MGM musicals, but what drives me crazy is when they would have the leading lady's singing voice dubbed with a singing voice that didn't sound anything close to their speaking voice.  One dubbing that I thought was very well done was Rita Hayworth's dubbing in Gilda (albeit a Columbia film).  I didn't even realize it wasn't Rita until I was reading about the making of Gilda.  

And Marni Nixon, great singer, but her singing voice did not match either Natalie Wood or Audrey Hepburn's natural voices, at all. 

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The Sad Sack  (1957)  -  5/10

220px-The_Sad_Sack_(movie_poster).jpg

Military comedy based on a comic book. Jerry Lewis stars as Pvt. Meredith Bixby, whose 6-week basic training has now stretched to 7 months. Army psychologist Maj. Shelton (Phyllis Kirk) assigns Cpl. Dolan (David Wayne) and Pvt. Wenaslawsky (Joe Mantell) to make sure that Bixby finally passes muster. Later, they all end up in Morocco where they get into more scrapes and foul-ups. Featuring Liliane Montevecchi, Gene Evans, Abraham Sofaer, George Dolenz, Marilyn Hanold, Shepperd Strudwick, Mary Treen, Michael Ansara, Yvette Vickers, and Peter Lorre. Lewis' second solo outing is mild and clunky. I watched it for Lorre, looking sad and tired as an Arab. In the source comic, the main character's name is actually Pvt. Sad Sack, and he has an uncle named Col. Saggy Sack. No comment.

Source: internet

SadSack1957_cap1.jpg

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The Bonnie Parker Story  (1958)  -  5/10

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AIP released this heavily fictionalized take on the true story. Dorothy Provine stars as Bonnie Parker, a waitress in a greasy-spoon diner who decides to embark on a life of crime with Guy Barrow (Jack Hogan). She also works to get her husband Duke (Richard Bakalyan) out of prison. With Joe Turkel, William Stevens, Ken Lynch, Douglas Kennedy, John Mitchum, and Sydney Lassick. Barrow is so marginalized in this version that his name is even changed. Even if one ignores the true story, and takes this a fictional crime picture, it's still pretty bad. It was originally the bottom half of a double-bill with Machine Gun Kelly.

Source: internet

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Stan & Ollie (2018):  You don't have to be a huge fan of Laurel and Hardy (I'm not..) to enjoy this touching biography that is largely concerned with the end of their career.  Steve Coogan (Laurel) and John C. Reilly (Hardy) are both excellent as the duo, who we first see at the height of their popularity in the late 30's.  Offstage, they talk about their exes, parties, gambling...on stage, Coogan get into an argument (and these were frequent) with Hal Roach.  This is the point where decades of resentment begins:  Laurel felt Roach had taken advantage of them (he had..) and arranges for the duo to sign with Fox, but Hardy is a no-show. We're not sure if it's his allegiance to Roach, or perhaps the influence of his latest wife (who worked for Roach) but Hardy agrees to work with a new partner.  Advance to 1953, when the duo, their glory days behind, are in Europe for a stage tour.  No more ritzy hotels or swank theaters, but there is a hope of another film that keeps them going (they received no residuals from their days with Roach).  There are some funny incidents off stage that they handle like their characters, and the addition of their polar opposite wives (Shirley Henderson as the petite Mrs. Hardy, with almost constant chipmunk-like chatter, and Nina Arianda as the chain smoking, cool Russian Mrs. Laurel) bring some amusing scenes.  There comes a 'blow up' moment when they speak for the first time of that parting years ago..Hardy believing he was deserted, and Laurel claiming he was replaced.  It seems throughout the relationship that Laurel was more of the 'head' and Hardy 'the heart'.  It's not the end though:  faced with serious health problems, Hardy struggles to complete a last performance,  producing an emotional finale.  I did learn a few things I didn't know, like Laurel wrote all their bits, was in the cutting room, talking to directors..in fact was a workaholic concerned with all the details, and while Hardy appreciated this, he was more into life outside the studio.  In the end, we realize that they both loved the idea of "Laurel and Hardy", and each other. Great performances and visuals..recommend.                          Image result for stan and ollie 2018

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I checked out ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT (1941) this morning on TCM, I've seen it before and- I may have said this before, but I think it's a much more important film than it is given credit for. In many ways ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT embodies perfectly the tone, cadence, pace and feel for WB films of the forties. Poster+-+All+Through+the+Night_12.jpgi AM NOT sure if this film came out before THE MALTESE FALCON and HIGH SIERRA, but I think it's safe to say this TRIO of films made 1941 THE BREAKTHROUGH YEAR FOR BOGART.

CONRAD VEIDT is the EEEEEEEEEVILLE Nazi villain. It is my understanding that he was such a nice man and he died pretty soon after making this at an early age.

The female lead did not have much of a career, she doesn't quick "click" in this...

JUDITH ANDERSON is- as was the case in every role she got after REBECCA- underused; JANE DARWELL has a small but good part, and PETER LORRE is not in it enough, still watching him and VEIDT together is FUN!

spoiler:

all-through-the-night-bogart-veidt-boat-

what I (incorrectly it turns out) recalled as something hilarious from previous viewings was actually quite tragic i discovered as HANSEL THE NAZI DACHSUND is TRAGICALLY killed along with CONRAD VEIDT when their motorboat loaded with explosives hits a timber barge.

VEIDT deserved to eat splinters, but NOT YOU HANSEL, YOU DIDN'T DESERVE THAT!!!!!

they needed a rewrite of the scene wherein HANSEL

1. wears a tiny Kaiser Helmet and 2. LIVES AT THE FREAKIN' END and is adopted by BOGIE...

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4 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I like a lot of the 40s-50s MGM musicals, but what drives me crazy is when they would have the leading lady's singing voice dubbed with a singing voice that didn't sound anything close to their speaking voice.  One dubbing that I thought was very well done was Rita Hayworth's dubbing in Gilda (albeit a Columbia film).  I didn't even realize it wasn't Rita until I was reading about the making of Gilda.  

And Marni Nixon, great singer, but her singing voice did not match either Natalie Wood or Audrey Hepburn's natural voices, at all. 

Marni Nixon did a great job dubbing for Deborah Kerr in The King and I. I thought their voices sounded very similar.

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Born Reckless  (1958)  -  4/10

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Rodeo drama with Mamie Van Doren as Jackie Adams, a singer who works the rodeo circuit. She falls for champion rider Kelly Cobb (Jeff Richards), but when he starts making eyes at rich gal Liz (Carol Ohmart), Jackie has to work to keep her man. With Arthur Hunnicutt, Tom Duggan, Nacho Galindo, and Don "Red" Barry. Mamie sings several bad songs, and wears several bad outfits. No movie with Arthur Hunnicutt can be all bad, but this one tries hard. 

Source: internet

twPH27DM8BPPxklnXbxMsT2Ze5D.jpg

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THE KITCHEN (2019) *Score: 6.5/10* 

Starring: Melissa McCarthy, Tiffany Haddish, Elisabeth Moss, Domhnall Gleeson, Brian d'Arcy James, Margo Martindale, Common. 

This film takes place in Hell's Kitchen, NY, circa 1978/1979, and centers around a mob comprised of a family/friend circle of Irish. After Haddish's, McCarthy's, and Moss' husbands get arrested, they decide to take over the business and end up doing very well for themselves. 

I was very impressed with the main 3 women. I remember how people used to make fun of McCarthy a lot more, but as of recent years, she has proved herself to be quite adept at both comedy and drama, which is great. Haddish surprised me as well. I did think Moss was the best out of the three of them, though. And of course, Margo Martindale was good, as she always is. Definitely worth seeing if you enjoy crime dramas/period dramas. One of the better films I've seen from 2019 so far. 

Image result for the kitchen 2019

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7 hours ago, RoyCronin said:

Agree also that Iguana was such a wonderful, fabulous performance, how did AVA GARDNER not win every award?

 

The documentary said AVA wanted to live exclusively in SPAIN and work only in EUROPE, shooting movies in SPAIN or ITALY (although I think they filmed IGUANA in PUERTA VALLARTA, MEXICO, but I guess AVA made the exception because the part [and director and the costars] was great) I think because of that, she wasn't seen as HOLLYWOOD, also maybe ungrateful for leaving HOLLYWOOD behind, also her drinking held up production, also also it was taking a toll on her looks-also there was (valid) criticism for her being all palsy-walsy with GENERALISSIMO FRANCO'S REGIME)

Also also, the part walks a fine line between being supporting and lead, but 1964 was SUCH a weak year for actresses in a leading role, she really should've gotten at least nominated.

long story short (TOO LATE) I think AVA in 1964 was not seen as an investment for future projects, the way JUUUUUUUUUUUUUUULIE AAAAAAAANDREWS** most certainly was.

(**it's the magic word)

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59 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I checked out ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT (1941) this morning on TCM, I've seen it before and- I may have said this before, but I think it's a much more important film than it is given credit for. In many ways ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT embodies perfectly the tone, cadence, pace and feel for WB films of the forties. Poster+-+All+Through+the+Night_12.jpgi AM NOT sure if this film came out before THE MALTESE FALCON and HIGH SIERRA, but I think it's safe to say this TRIO of films made 1941 THE BREAKTHROUGH YEAR FOR BOGART.

CONRAD VEIDT is the EEEEEEEEEVILLE Nazi villain. It is my understanding that he was such a nice man and he died pretty soon after making this at an early age.

The female lead did not have much of a career, she doesn't quick "click" in this...

JUDITH ANDERSON is- as was the case in every role she got after REBECCA- underused; JANE DARWELL has a small but good part, and PETER LORRE is not in it enough, still watching him and VEIDT together is FUN!

spoiler:

all-through-the-night-bogart-veidt-boat-

what I (incorrectly it turns out) recalled as something hilarious from previous viewings was actually quite tragic i discovered as HANSEL THE NAZI DACHSUND is TRAGICALLY killed along with CONRAD VEIDT when their motorboat loaded with explosives hits a timber barge.

VEIDT deserved to eat splinters, but NOT YOU HANSEL, YOU DIDN'T DESERVE THAT!!!!!

they needed a rewrite of the scene wherein HANSEL

1. wears a tiny Kaiser Helmet and 2. LIVES AT THE FREAKIN' END and is adopted by BOGIE...

I like this a lot when I saw it some time ago, I think I wrote about it here. There was a quite a bit of humor as I remember, despite the subject matter which seemed very up-to-date as it relates to terrorist activity (although this facet didn't lord over the movie). Phil Silvers and Jackie Gleason in early roles, yes? I wish I could remember more. Here is a movie I would gladly see again. Just now checked Netflix and there it is. My account shows I rented in April 2018. Gosh, that wasn't so long ago, I ought to be able to remember more. :(

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Just now, laffite said:

I like this a lot when I saw [ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT] some time ago, I think I wrote about it here. There was a quite a bit of humor as I remember, despite the subject matter which seemed very up-to-date as it relates to terrorist activity (although this facet didn't lord over the movie). Phil Silvers and Jackie Gleason in early roles, yes? I wish I could remember more. Here is a movie I would gladly see again. Just now checked Netflix and there it is. My account shows I rented in April 2018. Gosh, that wasn't so long ago, I ought to be able to remember more. :(

1. Yes!!!!! it's VERY contemporary!

2. I've seen it a couple of times and I HAD FORGOTTEN AN AWFUL LOT ABOUT IT AS WELL! I think it's in part age and the stress of modern times and also the fact that there's a lot of story with a lot of movement and a lot of development goin on in ALL THROUGH THE NIGHT, again, it's a QUINTESSINTIAL WARNER'S MOVIE of the time, which means WE'RE ALWAYS ON THE MOVE, transition scenes, action , action, ACTION!

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20 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

ok, but why didn't they just let Ava sing this in the movie instead of being dubbed by Annette Warren? She sounds pretty good to me. 

I'm confused about this comment. It seems contradictory. I though she DID use her own voice in the clip. Maybe I'm not following the conversation closely enough>

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23 minutes ago, laffite said:

I'm confused about this comment. It seems contradictory. I though she DID use her own voice in the clip. Maybe I'm not following the conversation closely enough>

I meant in the original movie, sorry. In the clip it was her, and I was basically saying she sounded decent enough for them not to have to hire Annette Warren to do it for the movie. 

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12 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

I meant in the original movie, sorry. In the clip it was her, and I was basically saying she sounded decent enough for them not to have to hire Annette Warren to do it for the movie. 

Still confused. The clip was her and that WAS the movie, correct? In what movie was she dubbed, then? What was the original movie? Sorry, and thanks.

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20 minutes ago, laffite said:

Still confused. The clip was her and that WAS the movie, correct? In what movie was she dubbed, then? What was the original movie? Sorry, and thanks.

I believe the posted clip was an outtake with Gardner's voice left on the audio. In the released version it was dubbed over, but her original vocals were recorded during filming. Perhaps as a matter of course, or they had not yet decided to dub over her during principal production.

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The Party Crashers  (1958)  -  5/10

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Juvenile delinquent drama with Mark Damon as "Twig Webster" (yes, his name is Twig), a hellraising youngster who decides he wants to steal away fellow student Josh's (Bobby Driscoll) girlfriend Barbara (Connie Stevens). There's a lot of drinking, driving, and yes, even <gasp> party crashing. With Frances Farmer in her final film role as Driscoll's mom, Denver Pyle, Doris Dowling, Gary Gray, Walter Brooke, Cathy Lewis, and Onslow Stevens. Silly JD hysteria with the same old moral from the 1930's: the inattentive parents, busy with their drinking and philandering, are the real problem. 

Source: internet

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Postscript: the copy I watched was from taken from a recording off of a Canadian channel called Drive-In Classics. Is anyone around here familiar with it? It seems to have gone away the better part of a decade ago, but judging from what I read, I would have loved it.

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Revolt in the Big House  (1958)  -  6/10

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Career criminal Lou Gannon (Gene Evans) is sent up the river once again, and ends up rooming with young robber Rudy Hernandez (Robert Blake). Gannon devises an audacious escape plan, but things never work out as planned, do they? With Timothy Carey as "Bugsy", John Qualen, Sam Edwards, John Dennis, Walter Barnes, X Brands, John Mitchum, Arline Hunter, and Emile Meyer. Low-budget prison programmer from Allied Artists enlivened by the unhinged Carey. Blake uses an accent, and Gene Evans is Gene Evans.

Source: internet

zoom_67585318_Revolt_in_the_Big_House1.j

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Fazil (1928)

Howard Hawks directed this West Meets East silent romantic melodrama, distinguished by lavish production values and a Movietone soundtrack in which its theme song, "Nights of Splendor" is played throughout the film.

Dated as this romantic tale may be in many respects, there is still some modern currency in its tale of a culture clash between a Muslim East, which includes the title character, Fazil, a proud Arab chief who believes that any woman he marries is his possession, and a "modern" "free" Parisienne who becomes his spouse.

Beautiful Norwegian Greta Nissen plays the modern Parisienne who falls for the Arab prince. While her accent may have failed to win her the same role if the film had been made a talkie a year later, she is well cast in this silent and even rather seductive in her role. Wholesome all American Charles Farrell seems strange casting as the Arab prince. Given a pencil thin moustache and slightly darkened skin he at least underplays his role (excluding the scene in which he first sights Nissen and his eyes pop out like a character in a Tex Avery cartoon).

This film will not appeal to all but those who enjoy silent romantic costume melodramas will probably derive some pleasure from it, though the film is sorely lacking any action scenes. One scene of note that it is not lacking, however, occurs when Nissen arrives in Arabia and soon after entering Fazil's palace finds herself standing in the midst of her husband's eye popping harem. Like any modern woman, it doesn't take long before she's giving him an ultimatum - either they go or she's history.

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2.5 out of 4

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Penny and the Pownall Case  (1948)  -  7/10

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British comedic mystery with Peggy Evans as Penny Justin, a model who works with successful cartoonist Jonathan Blair (Christopher Lee) on a widely-syndicated comic strip. Penny, who's a fan of detective fiction, decides to investigate a murder (the Pownall of the title), leading to shocking surprises and much danger. Also featuring top-billed Ralph Michael as the Scotland Yard inspector on the case, Diana Dors (before the blonde hair), Olaf Pooley, Dennis Vance, and Ethel Coleridge. This very minor, 45-minute programmer is enjoyable within its meager ambitions. I thought Evans was very good, amusing and attractive, while a very young Lee is a stand-out in one of his earliest large roles.

Source: internet

penny-pownall-case-2-penny-in-characteri

tumblr_ohai4wRP9E1t859wso1_400.gif

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14 hours ago, laffite said:

I rented in April 2018. Gosh, that wasn't so long ago, I ought to be able to remember more. :(

Uh oh, rest assured, you're not the only one who experiences this. Rather than thinking it's a sign of aging (oh the horror) convince yourself that you have too many more important things on your mind than remembering a movie. Knowing the finite number of good classic movies, it's great when you can watch & enjoy a movie again.

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