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1 minute ago, LawrenceA said:

WR: Mysteries of the Organism (1971), a Hungarian arthouse freak-out from Dusan Makavejev

This is from Yugoslavia, not Hungary.

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7 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

This is from Yugoslavia, not Hungary.

Like I said, I had a bad day.

**** Yugoslavia, it's now Hungarian. Take that, geography.

Plus, it was terrible. Yugoslavia would thank me if they still existed. 

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Who Saw Her Die?  (1972)  -  6/10

220px-Whosawherdie.jpg

Italian giallo thriller with George Lazenby as a sculptor living in Venice. When his young daughter comes to visit, she is murdered, and as the police are helpless to solve the case, Lazenby sets out to do so himself. With Anita Strindberg, Adolfo Celi, Dominique Boschero, Peter Chatel, Piero Vida, Jose Quaglio, Alessandro Haber, and Nicoletta Elmi. This has a lot of rough edges, but it isn't all a bust. Lazenby, looking rail thin and sporting shaggy hair and a mustache, isn't bad as the determined father (even if he's dubbed in the English version by someone else). The killer is a mystery as in all giallo, but I guessed the correct culprit the instant he first appeared. The score by Ennio Morricone is memorable. Director Aldo Lado claims the Marlon Brando was originally set to star, but he decided to do The Godfather instead. 

Source: Blue Underground DVD

Who-Saw-Her-Die12.jpeg

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Antiques Roadshow Seasons 38 and 39 (2015-2017)

This gentle program displays common people with uncommon goods. It is interesting to learn some of the nuances of what makes an item valuable as a collectible and what makes it boot sale junk. I must wonder if there is a depression in Great Britain as customers often act as if a thousand Pounds is a life-changing amount of money. I found it mildly surprising that so many of the people attending have heard of Fabergé. 

I must wonder if it is on purpose that the majority of items shown are pottery, vases and tea sets or if that truly reflects what the English have in abundance and believe is valuable.

 

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

I had an extraordinarily awful day. I watched 4 movies, but due to the nature of the day's awfulness, I can't say that my reaction to them (I disliked them all) was due solely or even primarily to the movies themselves. The movies were:

  • Trafic (1971), a French comedy from Jacques Tati
  • WR: Mysteries of the Organism (1971), a Hungarian arthouse freak-out from Dusan Makavejev
  • The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant (1972), a German melodrama with an all female cast from Rainer Werner Fassbinder
  • Red Psalm (1972), a Hungarian musical drama from director Milos Jancso

So forgive me for not going into detail on these. If anyone feels strongly about them, feel free to chime in with accolades or condemnations. 

I probably like Petra better than you do. It was a bit slow but in a dreamlike way that brought out actress Margit Carstensen (at least a certsain slo-mo theatricality), who I like. She was (as you know) a Fassbinder staple as well Hanna Schyluga (sp). I'm not sure that servant girl said anything at all but she was so quietly obedient as to be an automaton. But she breaks out of that when she decides to bolt. Even robots can get fed up.

You probably know that Tati spent every penny he had on Playtime (1967) and anything he did after that, which was not much, was done on the cheap. I don't remember too much about Trafic but I remember it was rather threadbare. I'm a Tati fan but I don't remember laughing too much either.

/// 

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2 hours ago, rosebette said:

Sorry, but these pallid boys can't hold a candle to Errol.

Lol. 

I don't know if I'd call them "pallid."  I do love Errol though.

Luke Perry was pretty freaking hot though (that eyebrow scar! Those sideburns!).  I'm obsessed. I may have changed the wallpaper on my phone to a picture of Dylan McKay. 

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1 hour ago, SansFin said:

Antiques Roadshow Seasons 38 and 39 (2015-2017)

This gentle program displays common people with uncommon goods. It is interesting to learn some of the nuances of what makes an item valuable as a collectible and what makes it boot sale junk. I must wonder if there is a depression in Great Britain as customers often act as if a thousand Pounds is a life-changing amount of money. I found it mildly surprising that so many of the people attending have heard of Fabergé. 

I must wonder if it is on purpose that the majority of items shown are pottery, vases and tea sets or if that truly reflects what the English have in abundance and believe is valuable.

 

I love this show!  My favorite is when the do the update shows.  They will show a clip of the item being appraised back then and show what the item is worth now. The sound effect they make when the item depreciates makes me laugh.

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Young Winston  (1972)  -  7/10

Young_Winston.jpg

British biopic from writer Carl Foreman and director Richard Attenborough. The film charts the upbringing of future Prime Minister Winston Churchill (Simon Ward). Growing up in the shadow of his politician father Lord Randolph (Robert Shaw) and sharp-witted mother Lady Jennie (Anne Bancroft), the boy grows into a man determined to make them proud, first doing so in the Army, where he serves with distinction in multiple campaigns on various continents, and later with his own fledgling political career. The large cast includes John Mills, Anthony Hopkins, Ian Holm, Edward Woodward, Robert Flemyng, John Woodvine, Jack Hawkins, Patrick Magee, Laurence Naismith, Robert Hardy, Thorley Walters, Gerald Sim, James Cosmo, Nigel Hawthorne, and Jane Seymour. 

Although this is a bit overlong at 142 minutes, and it's a bit too much of a hagiography, there's still a lot to like in this. The battle scenes are of epic scale and well choreographed. The performances by Shaw and Bancroft are very good, and it's enjoyable seeing the various well-known cast members. The movie earned 3 Oscar nods (for Costumes, Art Direction, and Screenplay).

Source: Mill Creek DVD

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2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I love this show!  My favorite is when the do the update shows.  They will show a clip of the item being appraised back then and show what the item is worth now. The sound effect they make when the item depreciates makes me laugh.

There was not such a retrospective in any of the episodes which I watched. 

I found the "Impostor" section of the episodes interesting because I often did not think that any of the items was worth more than pocket money. 

I should perhaps note that I watched these on PlutoTV which has several of the seasons in their On Demand section as well as having a channel which constantly plays episodes.

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2 hours ago, SansFin said:

There was not such a retrospective in any of the episodes which I watched. 

I found the "Impostor" section of the episodes interesting because I often did not think that any of the items was worth more than pocket money. 

I should perhaps note that I watched these on PlutoTV which has several of the seasons in their On Demand section as well as having a channel which constantly plays episodes.

Interesting. I didn’t realize the show was available anywhere else but PBS. 

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9 hours ago, SansFin said:

Antiques Roadshow Seasons 38 and 39 (2015-2017)

This gentle program displays common people with uncommon goods. It is interesting to learn some of the nuances of what makes an item valuable as a collectible and what makes it boot sale junk. I must wonder if there is a depression in Great Britain as customers often act as if a thousand Pounds is a life-changing amount of money. I found it mildly surprising that so many of the people attending have heard of Fabergé. 

****I must wonder if it is on purpose that the majority of items shown are pottery, vases and tea sets or if that truly reflects what the English have in abundance and believe is valuable.***

 

Guess we’ll find out after the hard Brexit October 31. A lot of people are going to be standing on the corner shouting “OY, IVE A ROYAL DOULTON pot, saucer and cups set with sugar bowl and creamer with only  a slight nic on the handle, will sell for petrol, meds or food!!!”

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9 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Young Winston  (1972)  -  7/10

Young_Winston.jpg

British biopic from writer Carl Foreman and director Richard Attenborough. The film charts the upbringing of future Prime Minister Winston Churchill (Simon Ward). Growing up in the shadow of his politician father Lord Randolph (Robert Shaw) and sharp-witted mother Lady Jennie (Anne Bancroft), the boy grows into a man determined to make them proud, first doing so in the Army, where he serves with distinction in multiple campaigns on various continents, and later with his own fledgling political career. The large cast includes John Mills, Anthony Hopkins, Ian Holm, Edward Woodward, Robert Flemyng, John Woodvine, Jack Hawkins, Patrick Magee, Laurence Naismith, Robert Hardy, Thorley Walters, Gerald Sim, James Cosmo, Nigel Hawthorne, and Jane Seymour. 

Although this is a bit overlong at 142 minutes, and it's a bit too much of a hagiography, there's still a lot to like in this. The battle scenes are of epic scale and well choreographed. The performances by Shaw and Bancroft are very good, and it's enjoyable seeing the various well-known cast members. The movie earned 3 Oscar nods (for Costumes, Art Direction, and Screenplay).

Source: Mill Creek DVD

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662full-simon-ward.jpg

Sir Winston's two favourite films, by the way, were That Hamilton Woman and The Sea Hawk, a pair of costume historical romances which featured England standing up to foreign invaders, obviously correlating to what the nation was also facing in the early '40s.

I haven't seen Young Winston but thanks for the review, Lawrence. I'll have to put the film on my "to see" list.

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11 hours ago, SansFin said:

I found it mildly surprising that so many of the people attending have heard of Fabergé. 

 

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5 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Interesting. I didn’t realize the show was available anywhere else but PBS. 

This is the episode in which Fiona Bruce has a giraffe named for her: https://pluto.tv/on-demand/series/antiques-roadshow/season/38/episode/plas-newydd-1-38-1

"Plas Newydd is a country house set in gardens, parkland and surrounding woodland on the north bank of the Menai Strait, in Llanddaniel Fab, near Llanfairpwllgwyngyll, Anglesey, Wales."

 

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15 minutes ago, Fedya said:

 

I thank you for that information. I was not aware that the illustrious name of the world's greatest goldsmith was now associated with cheap cosmetics. 

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15 hours ago, SansFin said:

I found it mildly surprising that so many of the people attending have heard of Fabergé. 

lot of people saw Octopussy.

51o9J-iSiXL.jpg

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Zatoichi at Large  (1972)  -  6/10

z23_3.jpg

23rd entry in the long-running Japanese film series. Zatoichi (Shintaro Katsu), the blind masseur and master swordsman, helps deliver the baby of a woman he finds mortally wounded by the side of the road. She whispers a name before dying, so Ichi takes the baby to the small village where the father resides. He ends up battling yakuza thugs who are strong-arming the locals, as well as extorting entertainers in town for a festival. With Rentaro Mikuni, Hisaya Morishige, Etsushi Takahashi, Naoko Otani, Osamu Sakai, and Renji Ishibashi. I thought this was the worst installment in the series that I've yet seen. The story is sloppy and retreads over a lot of familiar territory. There's also a lot of comedy awkwardly shoehorned in, largely by the traveling entertainers. The series really seems to be running out of steam by this point.

Source: Criterion Blu-ray

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WILD AT HEART (1990) *Score: 4/10*

Starring: Laura Dern, Nicolas Cage, Diane Ladd, Willem Dafoe. 

I have no words. This was my film club's pick of the week. I loved Laura Dern in this, but I was extremely bored (which seems to be the general consensus of the group). i don't even feel like talking about it. This is my third Lynch film, but that's nothing to be proud of (although the only one I liked was Blue Velvet). 

Image result for wild at heart 1990

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16 hours ago, SansFin said:

Antiques Roadshow Seasons 38 and 39 (2015-2017)

This gentle program displays common people with uncommon goods. It is interesting to learn some of the nuances of what makes an item valuable as a collectible and what makes it boot sale junk. I must wonder if there is a depression in Great Britain as customers often act as if a thousand Pounds is a life-changing amount of money. I found it mildly surprising that so many of the people attending have heard of Fabergé. 

I must wonder if it is on purpose that the majority of items shown are pottery, vases and tea sets or if that truly reflects what the English have in abundance and believe is valuable.

 

One of my fave shows. I have an antique sewing table that was my great grandmothers, appraised at 100 dollars twenty years ago on the Antiques Roadshow. At one half the size. I wonder what it is worth now. Let's see 1895. Twice the size of the table on Road Show. Nothing I would care to sell anyway and none of my family wants any of my antiques. I have inherited my mom and aunt's wedding gifts from the 50's. Mixing bowls and what not that are rare now, but nobody wants them. I have a sandwich tray made of sterling silver that nobody wants. Of course, who the heck serves tea sandwiches on a tray anymore?

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The other thing that sucks is none of my family wants my film library, I have several bios and film histories, a bunch of books and DVDs that nobody wants. And I'm at the age now where I need to endow my treasures upon some unsuspecting soul. 

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3 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

The other thing that sucks is none of my family wants my film library, I have several bios and film histories, a bunch of books and DVDs that nobody wants. And I'm at the age now where I need to endow my treasures upon some unsuspecting soul. 

I think of the 'treasures' I have around my house, and frankly, I don't think any of the younger members of my family would appreciate them or get the pleasure and use out of them as I have over the years.  Compared to my siblings, I have the least amount of clutter in my house, but I also have more stuff that I don't use and really need to find a way to discard properly.  I'm big into recycling, but much of what I need to get rid of is books, and finding a place to take hardbound and paperback books for recycling is virtually impossible.  I've asked people at my local library, and I've checked online, but there's no easy way to recycle such things.  For one thing, you've got to separate the binding from the book before any place will take it.  Who's got time to separate so many pages from the binding.  You'd need an industrial-strength jigsaw to take on that job.

I guess the age-old question comes into play here:  Do we own our possessions, or do they own us?

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Zatoichi in Desperation  (1972)  -  6/10

z24_5.jpg

24th entry in the long-running Japanese film series. Zatoichi (Shintaro Katsu), the blind masseur and master swordsman, travels to a notorious town, known as a den of vice, in order to return a shamisen (a sort of Japanese banjo) to the relative of an old woman who died. As usual, Ichi ends up embroiled in a battle between ruthless yakuza gangsters and poor locals. With Kiwako Taichi, Kyoko Yoshizawa, Yasuhiro Koume, Joji Takagi, Asao Koike, and Katsuo Nakamura. For the first and only time in the classic run of the series, Katsu directs as well as stars. He indulges in a lot of cinematic tricks (repeated rapid-edit flashbacks, artsy lighting designs, extreme close-ups) that seem to distract from, more than add to, the story. The movie is still enjoyable, but by this point the filmmakers seem to be twiddling their thumbs storywise.

Source: Criterion Blu-ray

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Beach of the War Gods  (1973)  -  6/10

beach-of-the-war-gods-play-dirty-cinema-

Hong Kong martial arts from writer, director and star Jimmy Wang Yu. Set in the late 16th century, Jimmy stars as Hsia Feng, an expert fighter who recruits a small army to fight off invading Japanese forces. With Fei Lung, Yeh Tien, Han Hsieh, Yi Kuei Chang, and Shou Liang Ko. This has a bit of a Seven Samurai/Magnificent Seven vibe, with Jimmy gathering unique fighters, including a guy with a scarred face who's festooned with bandoliers full of throwing daggers. However, there's virtually no character development beyond the main two or three guys, and much of the last act battle scenes become repetitive.

Source: Shout Factory DVD

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4 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

lot of people saw Octopussy.

51o9J-iSiXL.jpg

I would not have thought that audiences found the egg as worthy of their focus as other visual curves displayed in the movie.

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3 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

One of my fave shows. I have an antique sewing table that was my great grandmothers, appraised at 100 dollars twenty years ago on the Antiques Roadshow. At one half the size. I wonder what it is worth now. Let's see 1895. Twice the size of the table on Road Show. Nothing I would care to sell anyway and none of my family wants any of my antiques. I have inherited my mom and aunt's wedding gifts from the 50's. Mixing bowls and what not that are rare now, but nobody wants them. I have a sandwich tray made of sterling silver that nobody wants. Of course, who the heck serves tea sandwiches on a tray anymore?

I suspect that you are speaking of an American version of the program. The only furniture which I remember seeing in these episodes were cabinets and desks which were 18th Century or earlier.  

One episode of what I watched had an assortment of bowls, pitchers and so forth all of bright orange glass. The customer seemed quite pleased to have such a collection. The expert spoke highly of certain aspects but was quite clear also that such items have essentially no value now because the high point of collecting such things is long past and it is unlikely to ever again be desired by collectors.

Silver items have the positive factor that they will retain a certain portion of their value due to their content. The experts on the program at times stated the melt value of an item. The appraised value varied from slightly above that to several times that even for objects with little historical value. My insignificant duther has a small collection of Art Deco silverplate.  The silver content is negligible but they are decorative and are likely to return their cost as he only buys items which are vastly underpriced.

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