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I Just Watched...

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3 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

The other thing that sucks is none of my family wants my film library, I have several bios and film histories, a bunch of books and DVDs that nobody wants. And I'm at the age now where I need to endow my treasures upon some unsuspecting soul. 

Have you thought of offering them to a film studies program at a college or university? The local community college was quite happy to receive a large amount of books and papers on woodworking and machining as subsidiary research material for their vocational training programs.

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3 hours ago, midwestan said:

I think of the 'treasures' I have around my house, and frankly, I don't think any of the younger members of my family would appreciate them or get the pleasure and use out of them as I have over the years.  Compared to my siblings, I have the least amount of clutter in my house, but I also have more stuff that I don't use and really need to find a way to discard properly.  I'm big into recycling, but much of what I need to get rid of is books, and finding a place to take hardbound and paperback books for recycling is virtually impossible.  I've asked people at my local library, and I've checked online, but there's no easy way to recycle such things.  For one thing, you've got to separate the binding from the book before any place will take it.  Who's got time to separate so many pages from the binding.  You'd need an industrial-strength jigsaw to take on that job.

I guess the age-old question comes into play here:  Do we own our possessions, or do they own us?

Isn't it awful?? The kids today have no appreciation for the junk we collected. I'm watching Leave it to Beaver and I have June's Pyrex bowls sitting on my counter and I use them!!!! I actually use the bowls to mix cakes, cookies and brownies. I went to my brother's house to make cookies for his Kywait/Desert Army boy, in a 1947 mixer and we cracked up doing Three Stooges dialogue about how to use a mixer. And so it goes.

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4 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

The other thing that sucks is none of my family wants my film library, I have several bios and film histories, a bunch of books and DVDs that nobody wants. And I'm at the age now where I need to endow my treasures upon some unsuspecting soul. 

it boggles my mind how more people my age don't seem to care about film history/US history. My grandparents' house is a treasure trove to me. 

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42 minutes ago, SansFin said:

Have you thought of offering them to a film studies program at a college or university? The local community college was quite happy to receive a large amount of books and papers on woodworking and machining as subsidiary research material for their vocational training programs.

Great advise.    Being an amateur jazz guitarist I have a lot of guitars and musical 'stuff'.   My wife is 12 years younger and has no use for any of my musical belongings.   So I made a list of what will be given to my friends - the guys I play music with that I know would welcome this stuff.     BUT, there is one problem;  I live a healthy lifestyle.  What if I outlive them all?   Sadly one guy,  who was a few years younger than me, has passed. 

You have given me a good back-up plan idea.     

     

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2 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Great advise.    Being an amateur jazz guitarist I have a lot of guitars and musical 'stuff'.   My wife is 12 years younger and has no use for any of my musical belongings.   So I made a list of what will be given to my friends - the guys I play music with that I know would welcome this stuff.     BUT, there is one problem;  I live a healthy lifestyle.  What if I outlive them all?   Sadly one guy,  who was a few years younger than me, has passed. 

You have given me a good back-up plan idea.     

     

Wicked.

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52 minutes ago, SansFin said:

Have you thought of offering them to a film studies program at a college or university? The local community college was quite happy to receive a large amount of books and papers on woodworking and machining as subsidiary research material for their vocational training programs.

Yes,I have. I've got two bookcases full of bios and another bookcase full of DVDs. Not sure who is a fan of Boston ****, LOL

I've got two bookcases full of film histories and bios, and still more coining in - got a Lorne Greene bio that came in today sitting on the table out there on the deck, waiting to read.. And I'm still collecting.

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15 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Great advise.    Being an amateur jazz guitarist I have a lot of guitars and musical 'stuff'.   My wife is 12 years younger and has no use for any of my musical belongings.   So I made a list of what will be given to my friends - the guys I play music with that I know would welcome this stuff.     BUT, there is one problem;  I live a healthy lifestyle.  What if I outlive them all?   Sadly one guy,  who was a few years younger than me, has passed. 

You have given me a good back-up plan idea.     

     

All right, JamesJazz, Shake it!!!

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Cleopatra Jones  (1973)  -  7/10

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Blaxploitation classic from director Jack Starrett and writer Max Julien (The Mack).  Cleopatra Jones (Tamara Dobson) is a special government agent with global jurisdiction determined to end the heroin trade, be it burning down the poppy fields of Asia, or busting L.A. dealers. This crusade makes her an enemy of crime boss "Mommy" (Shelley Winters). With Bernie Casey, Antonio Fargas, Albert Popwell, Bill McKinney, Michael Warren, Dan Frazer, Brenda Sykes, Stafford Morgan, Paul Koslo, Don Cornelius, Jeannie Bell, and Esther Rolle. This was a ridiculously entertaining slab of pure-70's cheese, from the comical characters, to Shelley Winters' performance as the angry lesbian villain, and especially Dobson's unbelievable wardrobe. There are badly-choreographed martial arts fights, a lengthy car chase (including in the L.A. river), racist cops, and a goofy nightclub scene. 

Source: Warner DVD

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Count Dracula's Great Love  (1973)  -  7/10

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Spanish horror from director Javier Aguirre. When a group of travelers have an accident on the Borgo Pass in Transylvania, they seek refuge in the nearby sanitarium, which had been abandoned for many years, but has recently reopened under the ownership of Dr. Wendell Marlow (Paul Naschy). The four beautiful female travelers are soon targeted by a vampiric presence in the crumbling edifice which may be the notorious Count Dracula himself! With Haydee Politoff (from La Collectionneuse), Rosanna Yanni, Mirta Miller, Ingrid Garbo (certainly not a stage name), Victor Barrera, Alvaro De Luna, and Susanna Latour. Most people will dislike this bizarre Euro-sleaze horror offering, but I found it very entertaining. There's a lot of gratuitous nudity (including some boob clawing, and Naschy's hairy backside), bloody violence (but of the variety where the blood looks like melted crayola crayons), and several unintentionally humorous bits. I'm not sure when this is supposed to be set, as the characters discuss the events of the Dracula novel as if they were a long time ago, yet everyone is still dressed in 19th century finery and using horse-drawn carriages.

Source: Amazon video (with a Fandor subscription)

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The Crawling Eye (1958) UK film title The Trollenberg Terror

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I watched this for a week straight laying on my aunts rug on Million Dollar Movie, had to be in '59-'60-ish. It was the next best thing to a theater experience, my head was about three feet from the big console TV,  it was pretty cool as a kid. The multi generational Youtube streamer available sucks. It must have been something to see on the big screen for anyone my age. Anyway it all looks cheesy now. Forest Tucker stars. 6/10 

double billed with....

Attack of the Crab Monsters (1957) 

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Roger Corman directed with a cast of nobodies. This was on TV also in the 60s. Radiocative cloud produces giant land crabs on a small Pacific atoll. The crabs, who acquire the minds of the people they eat, are quickly excavating the crumbling island with subterranean tunnels reducing the islands area as the undermined surface collapses into the sea. 6/10

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Genesis II  (1973)  -  6/10

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TV-movie science fiction from writer-producer Gene Roddenberry. Alex Cord stars as an engineer in the near-future year of 1979 who volunteers as a guinea pig testing a new suspended animation technique. An earthquake traps his laboratory underground, and he's not discovered until the year 2133. His rescuers are part of a group known as PAX, who live underground in resistance to the mutants who rule above known as the Tyrannians. Cord gets swept up in their conflict. With Mariette Hartley, Percy Rodrigues, Ted Cassidy, Harvey Jason, Titos Vandis, Lynne Marta, Majel Barrett, Liam Dunn, Leon Askin, and Bill Striglos. This was a failed pilot for a TV series, and it would be reworked several more times, twice as TV-movies/failed pilots (both with John Saxon), and much later as the syndicated series Andromeda with Kevin Sorbo. This version is passable, with some interesting touches here and there, but a lot of silliness as well. The Tyrannian mutants are supposed to be bigger, stronger versions of normal humans, and yet Ted Cassidy was not cast as one of them.

Source: Warner Archive DVD

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14 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Cleopatra Jones  (1973)  -  7/10

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A highly entertaining comic action film. Stunning Amazonian beauty Tamara Dobson did a sequel to this one but never got any more good roles. The supporting cast is excellent. Shelley Winters is a hoot as drug dealing "Mommy", it seems like she did not say no to any role in the 1970s. Dan Frazer is solid as Cleo's boss, similar to the police chief he would play in "Kojak", he also has one of the best lines:

After Cleo gets into a brawl, he asks her if she's okay.

 She says "My body's okay", his reply "Okay? It's magnificent!"

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12 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Genesis II  (1973)  -  6/10

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Seeing this image of Mariette Hartley reminds me of those Polaroid commercials that she started doing with James Garner by the end of the '70s. The two had tremendous chemistry, enough that Hartley wore a shirt in public that said, "No, I am NOT Mrs. James Garner." The popularity of the commercials lead to Hartley having an appearance or two in Garner's television series, The Rockford Files. Years later, though, in an interview Hartley let it be known that one of her regrets is that the Polaroid commercials did not lead to she and Garner being teamed in a movie together.

 

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36 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Seeing this image of Mariette Hartley...

I like the story I read about Hartley's appearance in Genesis II. Gene Roddenberry had gotten a lot of flack from network censors when making Star Trek about visible navels, going so far as to order reshoots with the actors/actresses wearing new costumes that covered their belly buttons. Roddenberry was so irritated by it that by the time he was creating Genesis II, he decided to make the physical characteristic that identified someone as being part of the mutant race as having a double navel. If the series had continued, there would have been navel-revealing in most episodes!

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I was quite happy to come across KEN RUSSELL'S 1988 LAIR OF THE WHITE WORM, which I believe I saw on cinemax or showtime sometime in the 1990's and have been looking for ever since i watched CRIMES OF PASSION last summer.

numerous sources claim this is a "loose adaptation" of BRAM STOKER'S STORY, it's not, it's actually a DECIDEDLY FAITHFUL ADAPTATION moved cleverly to the present day and stands as a pretty good example of someone taking some odd, outdated material and doing a pretty good job at adapting it into something people today would watch. (I actually listened to the story on AUDIOBOOK several years ago and it is...um, really something.)

HUGH GRANT absolutely seems like a future star and is perfect in a role that would be not the least out of place in a JAMES WHALE HORROR movie, PETER CAPALDI is also terrific- the surprising weak spots for me were the three actresses, while KEN RUSSELL movies have their admitted shortcomings, they often have INCREDIBLE PERFORMANCES from actresses who are fully committed to an astonishing degree (KATHLEEN TURNER in CRIMES OF PASSION comes to mind immediately) that's not present here, the female protagonists are quite weak (although CATHERINE OXENBERG is fetching in her NANA KNICKERS (the BRITISH EQUIVALENT TO GRANNY PANTIES); AMANDA DONOHOE seems willing, but  it seems like she was not offered much in the way of direction (she embaresses herself in a dance scene)

it's still fun and cheeky and highly watchable and there are some great locations (including WAYNE MANOR FROM 1989 BATMAN) and the SCOTTISH EQUIVALENT OF GWAR SHOWS UP IN ONE SCENE!!!!

...at the same time, there are also some moments that feel a tad amateurish (I think RUSSELL was a brilliant mind hampered in later years by SOMETHING...drugs? demons? both..?)

 

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Go Ask Alice  (1973)  -  6/10

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Drug scare TV-movie drama about 15-year-old Alice (Jamie Smith-Jackson), a nice, shy new-girl-in-school who falls in with the wrong crowd and gets strung out on drugs. With William Shatner and Julie Adams as her parents, Ruth Roman as a psychiatrist, Andy Griffith as a worldly priest, Wendell Burton, Ayn Ruymen, Robert Carradine, Charles Martin Smith, and Mackenzie Phillips in her debut. This is very sincere, like an After School Special. I was hoping for more hysteria. Shatner, sporting a terrible mustache, glasses and a middle-class dad haircut, is wasted. 

Source: YouTube

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2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

she did not say no to any

anything, she sorta gives you that impression.

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The Hound of the Baskervilles  (1972)  -  6/10

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TV-movie adaptation of the Arthur Conan Doyle story. Stewart Granger stars as Sherlock Holmes who, assisted by compatriot Dr. Watson (Bernard Fox), sets out to solve the case of a supposedly cursed family endangered by a ghostly dog. With William Shatner, Anthony Zerbe, Sally Ann Howes, Jane Merrow, Ian Ireland, John Williams, and Alan Caillou as Lestrade. Not the most memorable version of the story, although Granger is a game Holmes. An early flashback sequence, featuring a dubbed Shatner sporting long hair and a beard, is memorable. This was a failed pilot, and if it had gone to series, it would have alternated with a pair of other classic detective revivals: Nick Carter starring Robert Conrad, and Hildegarde Withers starring Eve Arden.

Source: YouTube

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Go Ask Alice  (1973)  -  6/10

Andy Griffith sure made some "as far away from Mayberry as I can get" television movies in the early 1970s.

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6 minutes ago, LiamCasey said:

Andy Griffith sure made some "as far away from Mayberry as I can get" television movies in the early 1970s.

Yes, he did. At least in this one he was still a nice guy. In many of them he's a creep to one degree or another.

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The Horror at 37,000 Feet  (1973)  -  6/10

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TV-movie horror thriller with passengers and crew on a transatlantic flight threatened by a supernatural menace emanating from an ancient artifact in the cargo hold. With Chuck Connors as the pilot, Buddy Ebsen as a mean businessman, Roy Thinnes as a wealthy architect, William Shatner as an alcoholic ex-priest, Paul Winfield as a doctor, France Nuyen, Lyn Loring, Jane Merrow, Will Hutchins, Darleen Carr, Russell Johnson, Brenda Benet, H.M. Wynant, and Tammy Grimes. Entertaining if silly horror tale with a good cast. I had to chuckle when Shatner is first shown nervous and drinking too much, leaving the other passengers and stewardesses to wonder what's wrong with him. My guess is that he saw something on the wing.

Source: CBS/Paramount DVD

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Couldn't Connors have just shot the menace with his rifle?

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Horror Rises from the Tomb  (1973)  -  6/10

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Spanish horror with Paul Naschy in multiple roles. In modern times, Hugo (Naschy) and three friends travel to his ancestral estate where they are stalked by the vengeful spirits of a decapitated 16th century warlock (also Naschy) and his partner (Helga Line). With Emma Cohen, Victor Barrera/Vic Winner, Betsabe Ruiz, Julio Pena, Maria Jose Cantudo, and Luis Ciges. There's a lot of blood and skin in this Naschy effort, said to be one of his personal favorites. This was a re-watch for me, and I was most impressed by the restoration, as I'd only seen awful looking cheap video releases in the past.

Source: Scream Factory Blu-ray

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6 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Horror Rises from the Tomb  (1973)  -  6/10

Is it time for me to get back to my Paul Naschy discs?!?

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4 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Yes, he did. At least in this one he was still a nice guy. In many of them he's a creep to one degree or another.

That's true. I think one of them was "Savages" (1974) where he played a psycho hunter who stalks humans instead of animals.

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