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On 8/27/2019 at 10:00 AM, cigarjoe said:

Half of The Grey Fox (1982)

Image result for The Grey Fox 1982

before my chromecast crapped out, forgot how good it was.

The second half is good, too. Richard Farnsworth delivers a beautifully understated naturalistic performance. There's not a false note in it.

Our Bogie on these boards is perhaps too modest to mention it but he participated in the making of The Grey Fox and came up with the suggestion of having a viewing of The Great Train Robbery serve as an inspiration for the film's main protagonist to emulate what he saw on the screen.

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Just finished SOMEWHERE IN THE NIGHT starring John Hodiak. This was a film noir that I had not seen. It's really good with the usual plot turns and mysterious characters. I won't go any further so as not to spoil the ending. I highly recommend it to all my friends that enjoy this genre.

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30 minutes ago, kingrat said:

I like Bunny Lake Is Missing but always felt that it suffered because of . . . Carol Lynley in the lead role. The casting is off in some other roles, too. If you were casting a heterosexual lecher, would you say, "I know! Let's get Noel Coward!" And Olivier needed the money, and his performance is certainly decent, but really, John Williams could have played the detective more stylishly. Now Keir Dullea is appropriately cast, and Martita Hunt romps off with the film as the loony, creepy lady who tape records children's dreams. The movie as a whole isn't bad, but not up to the standard of Preminger's 40s and 50s noirs.

SHE REALLY DOES! I can still hear her saying the name "BUNNY LAKE."

The old Bint she plays in this makes her '46 MISS HAVISHAM look like LILLIAN GISH in NIGHT OF THE HUNTER in terms of "old broads you'd trust to leave your kids with for any length of time...provided you actually like your kids."

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I also have to say BUNNY LAKE IS MISSING, SUSAN SLADE and RETURN TO PEYTON PLACE would all make good programming choices for MOTHER'S DAY.

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20 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

Just finished SOMEWHERE IN THE NIGHT starring John Hodiak. This was a film noir that I had not seen. It's really good with the usual plot turns and mysterious characters. I won't go any further so as not to spoil the ending. I highly recommend it to all my friends that enjoy this genre.

SITN was the second film directed by Joseph Leo Mankiewicz,  (after Dragonwyck, also 1946). 

Of course he would go on to direct other films,  like All About Eve, that made his nephew very proud.

SITN was also Nancy Guild first film,  and IMO the best film she was in.

 

 

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26 minutes ago, Hoganman1 said:

Just finished SOMEWHERE IN THE NIGHT starring John Hodiak. This was a film noir that I had not seen. It's really good with the usual plot turns and mysterious characters. I won't go any further so as not to spoil the ending. I highly recommend it to all my friends that enjoy this genre.

Agree very good with with a nice cast including Lloyd Nolan, Richard Conte, Sheldon Leonard, Margo Woode, and John Russell.

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6 hours ago, EricJ said:

I've never really thought of Donald Pleasance as "overacting"--Even when playing "good" characters, that calm, creepy, under-emotional lobotomized drone adds to the unsettling atmosphere of whatever he's in.  (He mentioned that before "The Great Escape", he'd been in a prison camp during the War, and unlike gentleman-horror actors like Christopher Lee and Peter Cushing, I've always wondered whether he came out of it with every single marble intact.)

I think I agree with this, but the "calm, creepy, under-emotional lobotomized drone" can still seem kind of heavy at times. It escapes being termed overacting, but just barely.

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3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

That's Mary Astor? Look at the size of her coffee cup!

Guess this deserves another viewing. Like Bunny Lake, I've completely forgotten anything about it. Liked it OK, but not burned in my brain.

Yeah, I hadnt noticed the size of that cup at first. KING SIZE!

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

i've never seen THE CARDINAL, but I want to because I like JOHN HUSTON as an actor very much and it was the one time he was nominated for an Oscar for his acting. it's also the second of PREMINGER'S TWO BEST DIRECTOR NOMINATIONS, the other being for LAURA.

I don't remember her in BROADCAST NEWS! It's been A LONG TIME.

I have seen DEATH ON THE NILE A WHOLE WHOLE LOT OF TIMES GOING BACK TO MY YOUTH, and even as an eight year old, I remember thinking, "WOW, SHE SUCKS!"

LOIS CHILES'S two best worst moments IN DEATH ON THE NILE are

1.a scene with ANGELA LANSBURY which is amazing for its demonstrative AND INVALUABLE lesson in GOOD BAD ACTING vs. BAD BAD ACTING. Her reading of the line that ends with "...your vulgar dribble!" is SO BAD and yet SO DUBBED, it is mindboggling to sumise that THIS WAS THE BEST READ SHE GAVE OUT OF MULTIPLE TAKES WHILE SITTING IN AN ADR BOOTH IN LONDON.

2. The scene where SHE IS SUPPOSED TO BE DEAD AND SHE BLINKS. I think even DREW BARRYMOORE could convincingly play dead...although she always has the capacity to surprise me.

 

Thankfully Lynley isnt in the film very long, just the beginning. I havent seen the film in many years.

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Adventures with Amazon Prime!

I've dealt with 4 on there in the last 24 hours and am heading in on a fifth. Some of these expire on there at the end of the week so i wanted to get to them before then.

Once Upon a Time (1944) involves Cary Grant, child actor Ted Donaldson, Janet Blair, and a dancing caterpillar. It's supposed to be a fairy tale type of a film, and it greatly charmed me with its 40s snappiness. 

Rocket Gibraltar (1988) was the last semi-leading role for Burt Lancaster. in actuality, its an ensemble piece, with Lancaster as a dying patriarch who nobody, save his youngest grandchild (Macauley Culkin) seems to realize is dying. The plot is wispy, but its made up for due to Lancaster's gravitas, and a potent cast (not just Culkin, but also Patricia Clarkson, Kevin Spacey, Frances Conroy, Bill Pullman, John Glover, and Suzy Amis).

Star trek V: The Final Frontier (1989) Until last week i hadn't seen any of the films in the series, but I really admired the first one, and have decided to go after the rest of the first 6. I'd heard that this was by far the weakest of the first six, so i decided to get it out of the way before moving onto bigger things. In truth, there are some sequences in this that work quite well being either exciting or charming (and the cast is very likable), but its ultimately too porridgy for its own good in the closing sections.

And I thought that Catch-22 (1970) was an excellent film, a savage dark comedy and indictment of war, enacted by an exceptional cast and a style of filming that pays homage to its literary roots.

 

Now, back to Rosalind Russell in Tell It to the Judge.....

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3 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Once Upon a Time (1944) involves Cary Grant, child actor Ted Donaldson, Janet Blair, and a dancing caterpillar. It's supposed to be a fairy tale type of a film, and it greatly charmed me with its 40s snappiness. 

So you're the person who liked Once Upon a Time!

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I for one think Once Upon a Time is one of Grant's worst movies, although there are some 30s movies I still haven't seen.

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13 minutes ago, Fedya said:

I for one think Once Upon a Time is one of Grant's worst movies, although there are some 30s movies I still haven't seen.

I agree with you.   It is one of the few Grant films I turned off after seeing about 20 minutes of it (many years ago).

 

 

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

I don't remember her in BROADCAST NEWS! It's been A LONG TIME.

 

 

Yeah, Lois wasn't in Broadcast News for very long and Roy described the funniest bit of her role. The rest had her as an attractive anchorwoman and having that bizarre bedroom scene with William Hurt with its sudden jarring R -rated silhouette in close-up. 

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1 hour ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

It is one of the few Grant films I turned off after seeing about 20 minutes of it (many years ago).

I've done that many times. It's a wonderful experience. You should try it more often.

:lol:

///

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Looking at another on Amazon prime... and its not pretty so far. Bless the Beasts and Children (1971) is one of those films that feels very much of its era without having crossover appeal today. It's limp, and combined with some truly nasty scenes of  (actual) buffalo slaughters and some disturbingly long scenes of teenage boys in underwear in which the camera seemingly ogles lustfully over their bodies, it makes for a depressing experience.  It just tries too hard to be "hip" and "mod"...... Lovely  theme song from the Carpenters though.

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I believe the theme song was Oscar-nominated, so TCM could use it in 31 Days of Oscar.

Heck, show it in a double-feature with Endless Love, which was also nominated for the title song. :lol:

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Just now, Fedya said:

I believe the theme song was Oscar-nominated, so TCM could use it in 31 Days of Oscar.

Heck, show it in a double-feature with Endless Love, which was also nominated for the title song. :lol:

It was (up for Best song; and also according to  the database here, it  aired in 2012's 31 Days ) That category has occasionally housed some films that were panned otherwise: You Light Up My Life, Mannequin, 50 Shades of Gray, Yes Giorgio, Junior, Casino Royale (1967), Ben, Nine... Oh joy, I feel like I am making a listing for TCM presents 31 Days of Oscar: The Dark Side!

Incidently, the song lineup in 1971:
"Theme from Shaft"/Shaft
"The Age of Not Believing"/Bedknobs and Broomsticks
"All His Children"/Sometimes a Great Notion
"Bless the Beasts and Children"/Bless the Beasts and Children
"Life is What You Make It"/Kotch

Shaft obviously won, I'm guessing either this song or the Bedknobs and Broomsticks song was runner-up.

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5 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

It was (up for Best song; and also according to  the database here, it  aired in 2012's 31 Days ) That category has occasionally housed some films that were panned otherwise: You Light Up My Life, Mannequin, 50 Shades of Gray, Yes Giorgio, Junior, Casino Royale (1967), Ben, Nine... Oh joy, I feel like I am making a listing for TCM presents 31 Days of Oscar: The Dark Side!

Beverly Hills Cop II, Towering Inferno, Thank God It's Friday, Disney's "Robin Hood", Karate Kid II, Dick Tracy, Quest For Camelot, Beethoven's 2nd...

Alongside Best Makeup, the second-most most wild-card category.  😮

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come-and-get-it-walter-brennan-edward-ar

EVERY NOW and then, I try and fail to make it through something and I come here to offer opinions on what I did see and why I could not make it all the way through and seek any opinions you may  have on whether or not this is a failing on my part as a human.

side note- when i was younger, it was a BADGE OF SHAME to not finish a book or movie NO MATTER HOW BAD IT WAS. now that i am older and have more of a grasp of the value of time, i will cut out on something more often than i maybe ought...

with that said and aside, I watched a little more than 45 minutes of COME AND GET IT (1936) LAST NIGHT.

And if you all VenMo'd me $5 a piece, I'm not sure I could make it through.

I swear to you- until last night, I thought this movie was about FOOTBALL- I see now I was confusing it with PIGSKIN PARADE of the same year. it is in fact a LOGGING SAGA based on a novel by EDNA FERBER.

EDWARD ARNOLD stars as a POWER MAD LOGGING CZAR, I like EDWARD ARNOLD, he is AUTHORATATIVE without being STEIGER-Y about it, I root for him in MEET JOHN DOE; I think he is AMAZING in ALL THAT MONEY CAN BUY and I ADORE THAT WAR TIME SHORT WHERE HE PLAYS THE DEVIL AND JUST WATCHED IT A FEW WEEKS AGO.

However, he costars with WALTER BRENNAN in the role that won WALTER his first fo three OSCARS. I admit that I just do not like WALTER BRENNAN, although he was an EXCELLENT ACTOR and deserved the OSCAR for THE WESTERNER (although a case could be made he is THE LEAD in that film) i will give WALTER credit in that I did not recognize him at first because HE LOOKS LIKE A PLUCKED CHICKEN.

(I APOLOGIZE FOR THIS, BUT IT'S THE ONLY WAY I KNOW TO CONVEY IT)

Wältër pläys a SVEDISH CHÄRAÄKTER but äll de sübtlëtyÿ hoova MONTY PYTHON bit huböwt my sïstërr who vuz bït bī a mööse. Mööse bīts cæn be vėré nastëë i knöö.{Børk børk}

It is PURE, UNDISTILLED AGONY to watch and will make you PINE for the SUBTELTY of JOHN QUALEN as MULEY.

JOEL McREA is in this as ARNOLD'S son. His role is TERRIBLE and his DIALOGUE IS WORSE, but he manages to do a pretty good job with it because JOEL McCREA was that good an actor.

FRANCES FARMER is in it as a saloon girl. I had never sen her "in action" before- and I felt as if there was a fascinating nervous energy about her and that she did resemble JESSICA LANGE quite a bit.

However- in one of the ODDEST THINGS I CAN RECALL SEEING IN A MOVIE IN RECENT MEMORY- she performs a song in entirety in a saloon scene that was not only obviously dubbed in post-production but was it seems, for a reason i cannot fathom, DUBBED WITH AN AUDIO TRACK THAT WAS RECORDED ON A DICTAPHONE PLACED INSIDE A METAL TRASH CAN ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE ROOM.

Like, even RUDY VALLEE would say "so what's up with that WEIRDASSED ECHO?" and TOM WAITS would be like "DAMN, you sure you don't want to make that sound quality maybe a little less tinny and godawful on that recording?"

And then, I AM SERIOUS HERE, the crowd asks for an encore AND SHE PERFORMS THE ENTIRE GD SONG AGAIN. LITERALLY. FROM START TO FINISH.

bY THIS time, my patience- WHICH I READILY ADMIT IS not exactly a bottomless well to begin with- had been sorely taxed by what felt like FOUR AND A HALF HOURS OF GRAINY FOOTAGE OF LOG FLUMES. SERIOUSLY. THE ONLY REASON WALTER WON BEST SUPPORTING (besides the Extras voting) was that THE LOG FLUME REFUSED TO JOIN SAG

And so, I bailed on it. Was I wrong? Am I missing something? And anyone else know anything about just why this thing was PADDED AS A MATTRESS when it was based on a FREAKIN EDNA FERBER NOVEL, which I'm sure you could kill a horse with.

According to imdb the song FARMER PERFORMS (twice) later became LOVE ME TENDER. I had no clue, so puzzled was I the entire time by the WEIRD, WEIRD ECHO.

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On 8/28/2019 at 7:31 AM, EricJ said:

I've never really thought of Donald Pleasance as "overacting"--Even when playing "good" characters, that calm, creepy, under-emotional lobotomized drone adds to the unsettling atmosphere of whatever he's in.  

He is so very good at it that his role in: Telefon (1977) seems nearly to be typecasting.

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Virginia City (1940)

Big budget "A" western from Warner Brothers.

Randolph Scott plays a Confederate officer during the Civil War who is working undercover in Union run Virginia City, Nevada in order to get a wagon train with gold bullion back to Richmond, Virginia in an effort to re-vitalize the South's efforts and prolong the war. Errol Flynn is a Union agent out to stop him, bewitched by dance hall girl Miriam Hopkins, unbeknownst to him, also a Southern agent, while Humphrey Bogart plays the head of a band of Mexican outlaws who stir things up.

Michael Curtiz is at the helm of this massive production, but, for a Curtiz film, it's a surprisingly slow moving affair, at times, which also suffers from some key miscasting. Hopkins is hardly convincing as a saloon thrush, also seeming too old, particularly in some unflattering closeups, for Flynn. Bogart is amusing as the Mexican bandito, sporting a pencil thin moustache and an atrocious attempt at a Mexican accent. He's not to be taken seriously.

Flynn is typical Flynn, dashing and gallant. It's a paper thin characterization but he does manage to bring some style to the proceedings. Randolph Scott probably comes off best of the leads, a convincing westerner while also bringing a sense of grace and dignity to his role.

Alan Hale and Big Boy Guinn Williams are reunited with Flynn as rough hewn sidekicks (the three actors were friends off screen and it shows on screen), while you can also briefly spot a few actors who would go on to great fame in '50s television, Paul (The Rifleman) Fix, William (Perry Mason) Hopper and George (Superman) Reeves.

Sol Polito, Curtiz's favourite cinematographer, has some lovely images of the wagon train travelling through the Painted Desert (much of the film was effectively shot near Flagstaff and Sedona, Arizona) and Max Steiner contributes yet another expressive, at times, lyrical, musical score which greatly enhances the visuals.

One of the highlight moments in the film is when Flynn makes a daring escape on horseback across the desert pursued by Scott and the Confederate sympathizers. The sequence is excitingly shot by Curtiz (and scored by Steiner), ending when Flynn finds himself at the top of a giant mountainous decline and tries to ride down it, the horse stumbling as both rider and animal tumble to the bottom of the rocky terrain.

It's the kind of sequence which always makes me uncomfortable as the Hollywood studios were so cavalier in those days about the treatment of their horses. Once Flynn (actually, his stunt double in long shot) and the horse land in a heap at the bottom of the hill there is a two second moment in which you see the horse climb to his feet again. But you don't see him walk and you can only hope that the animal was okay and not, yet, another victim of Hollywood filmmaking.

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The stunt man is paid for this but that horse took a hell of a fall. He is standing, though, in the final image, but they don't let us see him walk. Let's hope the animal was okay.

 

 

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How things had changed by the time Virginia City was reissued in the '50s, with Flynn and Hopkins now billed in support of Scott (originally 3rd billed) and Bogart (4th billed in a small role).

2.5 out of 4

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Bless the Beasts and Children, well i did finish it, but then i wrote this rant to get the anger I have for it off my chest..... And I rarely if ever find a film that makes me feel like this.

Quote

 

I'm still in a bit of disbelief about this film. I really don't give out low scores like this often, only when something is truly bad or truly offensive to me, and yet here I am with this thing on my hands. The only decent thing about it is the lovely theme song from the Carpenters (what's a nice song like you doing in a place like this?), and everything else is not only flat and dull, but also quite mean-spirited and with a creepy lewd edge about it.

The movie goes off the rails almost as soon as the Columbia lady disappears and never finds its footing. Right off the top, the audience is exposed to a nightmare scene where buffalo are actually shown being slaughtered, and then a boy dreams that the hunters turn the guns on him and his friends, killing them. This is followed by the first of several long, queasy scenes where teenage boys are shown clad only in their underwear as the voyeuristic  camera lingers longingly, lustfully around them. So, within the the first 8 minutes, there are your main problems repeated several times throughout: animals actually getting killed on camera (albeit in footage obtained from a wildlife firm in Arizona, and not made specifically for the film) and a distinct pedophilic air that made me feel  disgusted and enraged.

If this wasn't enough to go wrong, this is then compounded by  the fact that the boys are all blurred characters; I don't feel that despite the fact that the film is about them, that we ever really get a handle on who they are or what they want other than that they want to save the buffalo. (admittedly one of the boys breaks through the haze briefly toward the end) And then the whole thing reeks of  something from  the early 70s that just laid there and died; with most classic films [and I am usually one of the biggest cheerleaders for classic films you could find], they have takeaways, like sparkling personalities, some insightful moments of human nature, a timeless quality, a message that resonates today, literate or snappy dialogue, great charm, period detail that captures the era in which it was made. Well, this has the period detail (painfully so, the clothes and hairstyles are horrendous), but nothing else. in the way that few films are, this is a dead zone, and one of the worst films it has ever been my misfortune to see.

 

 

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11 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

come-and-get-it-walter-brennan-edward-ar

EVERY NOW and then, I try and fail to make it through something and I come here to offer opinions on what I did see and why I could not make it all the way through and seek any opinions you may  have on whether or not this is a failing on my part as a human.

side note- when i was younger, it was a BADGE OF SHAME to not finish a book or movie NO MATTER HOW BAD IT WAS. now that i am older and have more of a grasp of the value of time, i will cut out on something more often than i maybe ought...

with that said and aside, I watched a little more than 45 minutes of COME AND GET IT (1936) LAST NIGHT.

And if you all VenMo'd me $5 a piece, I'm not sure I could make it through.

I swear to you- until last night, I thought this movie was about FOOTBALL- I see now I was confusing it with PIGSKIN PARADE of the same year. it is in fact a LOGGING SAGA based on a novel by EDNA FERBER.

EDWARD ARNOLD stars as a POWER MAD LOGGING CZAR, I like EDWARD ARNOLD, he is AUTHORATATIVE without being STEIGER-Y about it, I root for him in MEET JOHN DOE; I think he is AMAZING in ALL THAT MONEY CAN BUY and I ADORE THAT WAR TIME SHORT WHERE HE PLAYS THE DEVIL AND JUST WATCHED IT A FEW WEEKS AGO.

However, he costars with WALTER BRENNAN in the role that won WALTER his first fo three OSCARS. I admit that I just do not like WALTER BRENNAN, although he was an EXCELLENT ACTOR and deserved the OSCAR for THE WESTERNER (although a case could be made he is THE LEAD in that film) i will give WALTER credit in that I did not recognize him at first because HE LOOKS LIKE A PLUCKED CHICKEN.

(I APOLOGIZE FOR THIS, BUT IT'S THE ONLY WAY I KNOW TO CONVEY IT)

Wältër pläys a SVEDISH CHÄRAÄKTER but äll de sübtlëtyÿ hoova MONTY PYTHON bit huböwt my sïstërr who vuz bït bī a mööse. Mööse bīts cæn be vėré nastëë i knöö.{Børk børk}

It is PURE, UNDISTILLED AGONY to watch and will make you PINE for the SUBTELTY of JOHN QUALEN as MULEY.

JOEL McREA is in this as ARNOLD'S son. His role is TERRIBLE and his DIALOGUE IS WORSE, but he manages to do a pretty good job with it because JOEL McCREA was that good an actor.

FRANCES FARMER is in it as a saloon girl. I had never sen her "in action" before- and I felt as if there was a fascinating nervous energy about her and that she did resemble JESSICA LANGE quite a bit.

However- in one of the ODDEST THINGS I CAN RECALL SEEING IN A MOVIE IN RECENT MEMORY- she performs a song in entirety in a saloon scene that was not only obviously dubbed in post-production but was it seems, for a reason i cannot fathom, DUBBED WITH AN AUDIO TRACK THAT WAS RECORDED ON A DICTAPHONE PLACED INSIDE A METAL TRASH CAN ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE ROOM.

Like, even RUDY VALLEE would say "so what's up with that WEIRDASSED ECHO?" and TOM WAITS would be like "DAMN, you sure you don't want to make that sound quality maybe a little less tinny and godawful on that recording?"

And then, I AM SERIOUS HERE, the crowd asks for an encore AND SHE PERFORMS THE ENTIRE GD SONG AGAIN. LITERALLY. FROM START TO FINISH.

bY THIS time, my patience- WHICH I READILY ADMIT IS not exactly a bottomless well to begin with- had been sorely taxed by what felt like FOUR AND A HALF HOURS OF GRAINY FOOTAGE OF LOG FLUMES. SERIOUSLY. THE ONLY REASON WALTER WON BEST SUPPORTING (besides the Extras voting) was that THE LOG FLUME REFUSED TO JOIN SAG

And so, I bailed on it. Was I wrong? Am I missing something? And anyone else know anything about just why this thing was PADDED AS A MATTRESS when it was based on a FREAKIN EDNA FERBER NOVEL, which I'm sure you could kill a horse with.

According to imdb the song FARMER PERFORMS (twice) later became LOVE ME TENDER. I had no clue, so puzzled was I the entire time by the WEIRD, WEIRD ECHO.

Overall, I have to say I enjoyed "Come And Get It".  I first saw this film more than 40 years ago on my local PBS station.  I never knew the backstory to Frances Farmer's career and life until the movie "Frances" came out in the early 80's, and it made me appreciate "Come And Get It" even more.

That said, Lorna hit the nail on the head about the echo during the song early in the film in the logging camp's bar.  I don't know how the track got messed up, but I never heard an echo in "Aura Lee" in any other airing of this movie...and yes, it was a BIG DISAPPOINTMENT and DISTRACTING as all get-out.  Still, I stuck with the picture because Edward Arnold is great in it.  The final scene when Joel McCrea is about ready to punch his dad's lights out for making a pass at his young girlfriend brings everything to a head when Lotte yells at him, "Stop!  He's an old man!".  Andrea Leeds, who could have passed for Olivia DeHavilland's stunt double, played Arnold's daughter and McCrea's sister.  She's very good in her brief scenes, and her career, though not anywhere as tragic as Frances Farmer's, was relatively short too (she never made another movie after 1940).

And you're right about Edward Arnold, Lorna.  He was a fairly versatile actor who could play a convincing heavy like Rod Steiger or Raymond Burr, but unlike Steiger and Burr, he got chances to display his comedic talents too.

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On 8/28/2019 at 2:20 PM, TomJH said:

The second half is good, too. Richard Farnsworth delivers a beautifully understated naturalistic performance. There's not a false note in it.

Our Bogie on these boards is perhaps too modest to mention it but he participated in the making of The Grey Fox and came up with the suggestion of having a viewing of The Great Train Robbery serve as an inspiration for the film's main protagonist to emulate what he saw on the screen.

Yes it was finished it out the other day. I saw it first in a theater long ago but never again since until I discovered it streaming.

Thanks Bogie for a great film.

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