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11 hours ago, midwestan said:

Overall, I have to say I enjoyed "Come And Get It".  I first saw this film more than 40 years ago on my local PBS station.

That said, Lorna hit the nail on the head about the echo during the song early in the film in the logging camp's bar.  I don't know how the track got messed up, but I never heard an echo in "Aura Lee" in any other airing of this movie...and yes, it was a BIG DISAPPOINTMENT and DISTRACTING as all get-out. 

Andrea Leeds, who could have passed for Olivia DeHavilland's stunt double, played Arnold's daughter and McCrea's sister.  She's very good in her brief scenes, and her career, though not anywhere as tragic as Frances Farmer's, was relatively short too (she never made another movie after 1940).

 

1. Back when I didn't have cable, PBS was GREAT for the occasional CLASSIC MOVIE FIX. I haven't watched in years tho, I hope some stations still run the occasional classic if and when they can.

2. there is no feeling QUITE SO SATISFYING as when you view a film on TCM and notice something kind of esoteric and think "GEE, SHOULD I MENTION THIS? OR IS TOO OBSCURE FOR ANYONE ELSE TO EVEN NOTICE?" but then you do, and LO AND BEHOLD SOMEONE ELSE NOTICED TOO! Bless you for this.

3. you're making me reconsider going back to come and get COME AND GET IT. I had forgotten about ANDREA LEEDS, who of course, is AMAZING in STAGE DOOR. Maybe I'll give it another try this weekend....

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On 8/29/2019 at 6:13 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

come-and-get-it-walter-brennan-edward-ar

EVERY NOW and then, I try and fail to make it through something and I come here to offer opinions on what I did see and why I could not make it all the way through and seek any opinions you may  have on whether or not this is a failing on my part as a human.

side note- when i was younger, it was a BADGE OF SHAME to not finish a book or movie NO MATTER HOW BAD IT WAS. now that i am older and have more of a grasp of the value of time, i will cut out on something more often than i maybe ought...

with that said and aside, I watched a little more than 45 minutes of COME AND GET IT (1936) LAST NIGHT.

And if you all VenMo'd me $5 a piece, I'm not sure I could make it through.

I swear to you- until last night, I thought this movie was about FOOTBALL- I see now I was confusing it with PIGSKIN PARADE of the same year. it is in fact a LOGGING SAGA based on a novel by EDNA FERBER.

EDWARD ARNOLD stars as a POWER MAD LOGGING CZAR, I like EDWARD ARNOLD, he is AUTHORATATIVE without being STEIGER-Y about it, I root for him in MEET JOHN DOE; I think he is AMAZING in ALL THAT MONEY CAN BUY and I ADORE THAT WAR TIME SHORT WHERE HE PLAYS THE DEVIL AND JUST WATCHED IT A FEW WEEKS AGO.

However, he costars with WALTER BRENNAN in the role that won WALTER his first fo three OSCARS. I admit that I just do not like WALTER BRENNAN, although he was an EXCELLENT ACTOR and deserved the OSCAR for THE WESTERNER (although a case could be made he is THE LEAD in that film) i will give WALTER credit in that I did not recognize him at first because HE LOOKS LIKE A PLUCKED CHICKEN.

(I APOLOGIZE FOR THIS, BUT IT'S THE ONLY WAY I KNOW TO CONVEY IT)

Wältër pläys a SVEDISH CHÄRAÄKTER but äll de sübtlëtyÿ hoova MONTY PYTHON bit huböwt my sïstërr who vuz bït bī a mööse. Mööse bīts cæn be vėré nastëë i knöö.{Børk børk}

It is PURE, UNDISTILLED AGONY to watch and will make you PINE for the SUBTELTY of JOHN QUALEN as MULEY.

JOEL McREA is in this as ARNOLD'S son. His role is TERRIBLE and his DIALOGUE IS WORSE, but he manages to do a pretty good job with it because JOEL McCREA was that good an actor.

FRANCES FARMER is in it as a saloon girl. I had never sen her "in action" before- and I felt as if there was a fascinating nervous energy about her and that she did resemble JESSICA LANGE quite a bit.

However- in one of the ODDEST THINGS I CAN RECALL SEEING IN A MOVIE IN RECENT MEMORY- she performs a song in entirety in a saloon scene that was not only obviously dubbed in post-production but was it seems, for a reason i cannot fathom, DUBBED WITH AN AUDIO TRACK THAT WAS RECORDED ON A DICTAPHONE PLACED INSIDE A METAL TRASH CAN ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE ROOM.

Like, even RUDY VALLEE would say "so what's up with that WEIRDASSED ECHO?" and TOM WAITS would be like "DAMN, you sure you don't want to make that sound quality maybe a little less tinny and godawful on that recording?"

And then, I AM SERIOUS HERE, the crowd asks for an encore AND SHE PERFORMS THE ENTIRE GD SONG AGAIN. LITERALLY. FROM START TO FINISH.

bY THIS time, my patience- WHICH I READILY ADMIT IS not exactly a bottomless well to begin with- had been sorely taxed by what felt like FOUR AND A HALF HOURS OF GRAINY FOOTAGE OF LOG FLUMES. SERIOUSLY. THE ONLY REASON WALTER WON BEST SUPPORTING (besides the Extras voting) was that THE LOG FLUME REFUSED TO JOIN SAG

And so, I bailed on it. Was I wrong? Am I missing something? And anyone else know anything about just why this thing was PADDED AS A MATTRESS when it was based on a FREAKIN EDNA FERBER NOVEL, which I'm sure you could kill a horse with.

According to imdb the song FARMER PERFORMS (twice) later became LOVE ME TENDER. I had no clue, so puzzled was I the entire time by the WEIRD, WEIRD ECHO.

In The Toast of New York Frances Farmer has to choose between Edward Arnold and Cary Grant. SPOILER ALERT: she picks Cary Grant. Well, duh. In Come and Get It Frances Farmer the First (saloon girl) has to pick between Edward Arnold and Walter Brennan. Not quite the same kind of choice, is it? Personally, I'd be saying, "Monty, I'll see what's behind Door Number Three." And Lorna--you are so right about Brennan's performance in this film. It's like a screen test for Not as a Stranger, where you do get John Qualen and a few others, including Olivia De Havilland, doing the Min-ne-so-ta accent. If you haven't seen Not as a Stranger, you must. It's a Stanley Kramer production where decisions were made like, "Who can we cast as an aspiring medical student? I know, Frank Sinatra!"

But I digress. Frances Farmer the Second (the rich young lady) has to choose between Edward Arnold and Joel McCrea, which puts us back in "duh" territory. I also find Frances Farmer a very interesting actress. If she could have held things together, she could have been outstanding in film noir, instead of living a film noir.

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I watched most of "House of Strangers" Friday night during Susan Hayward's SUTS tribute.  Edward G. Robinson turns in a masterful performance as Gino Monetti, the Italian immigrant who has started up a neighborhood bank in New York City prior to the Wall Street crash of 1929.  When new banking regulations take effect, Robinson gets in hot water with bank examiners and is charged with fraud.  Three of Robinson's four sons pull a power play to have him take the fall so they can take over the 'new and improved' Monetti Bank.  Richard Conte, the only son who's not involved in the banking industry, but rather, a lawyer, still has a law office inside the bank.  Conte represents his father during the trial and makes a fateful decision to take the fall for his dad to keep him out of prison.  Conte's ploy works, and he's sent up for 7 years, but Robinson, while avoiding prison time, must give up control of his bank.

Once Robinson realizes he's been double-crossed by three of his sons (played by Luther Adler, Paul Valentine, and Efrem Zimbalist, Jr.), he mounts a campaign to have Conte exact revenge on his brothers by continually writing letters to his Sing-Sing son.  While Conte's in the jug, Robinson dies.  Conte is allowed to return home to see his dad laid out in the living room, then he sneers at his smug brothers and gestures his disdain for them.  All the while, Susan Hayward has fallen in love with Richard Conte before he gets convicted, and she proves to be as stubborn as he is over the family vendetta that Robinson has instilled in his son.  Conte wants revenge in the worst possible way, and he's just as bossy and demanding as his father was when he was alive.  Hayward basically gives him an ultimatum; ditch his plans for revenge on his brothers or she'll forever be 'forbidden fruit' when it comes to romance with him.

He finally sees the error of his ways.  His love for Hayward proves to be stronger than his hatred for his brothers.  But can he convince his siblings of his change of heart toward them?

Robinson wasn't even nominated for an Oscar as a lead or supporting actor in this film, but he received Best Actor for his role in "House of Strangers" at the Cannes Film Festival in 1949.  Overall, a very good picture that I'd like to see again.  Alas, it's not on TCM On Demand!  

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28 minutes ago, midwestan said:

I watched most of "House of Strangers"  Overall, a very good picture that I'd like to see again.  Alas, it's not on TCM On Demand!  

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRGGGGGH!

I forgot to record this and it has not shown up on TCM ON HULU (the equivalent of TCM ON DEMAND).

Thanks for the great write up tho.

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WHILE I MISSED HOUSE OF STRANGERS (1949), I did make it a point to see MY FOOLISH HEART (also 1949)-

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which aired on TCM for (I am pretty sure) the first time in a long, long time. I seem to recall it was left out when MISS SUSAN HAYWARD was the SOTM in September a few years back, I was wondering if it was stuck in RIGHTS ISSUE HELL or something. 

It is more known for being the one filmed version of a JD SALINGER STORY (as if there are SO MANY FROM WHICH TO CHOOSE!) and for THE ABSOLUTELY LOVELY THEME SONG (AND SCORE), which I am still humming to myself intermittently with the words to MR PAGANINI, PLEASE PLAY MY RHAPSODY, which I never noticed IS THE SAME MELODY.

It's a mess of a movie, but there is still MAGIC in it here and there.

It starts out quite well, with OUR GAL SUZIE in a CONNECTICUT MANSION playing THE BOOZIEST B***** I'VE EVER SEEN HER PLAY. She hates life. I love her. A friend from college comes to visit and SUSAN'S husband calls and she is SUCH A RIP-ROARING, STONE COLD, 24 KARAT BtotheItotheTtoheCtotheH to him, I KNOW EDWARD ALBEE was the audience EVERY SHOW, SCRIBBLING NOTES FURIOUSLY.

And then the husband shows up and I see it's KENT SMITH and I immediately understand and heartily approve of SUSAN'S level 11 COPPER BOTTOM status.

Yes, Susan, devour him and leave nothing but the bones.

SUSAN then has a flashback/alcoholic blackout where she remembers FALLING HOPELESSLY IN LOVE WITH DANA ANDREWS at the start of WWII.

NOT A SPOILER: OBVIOUSLY, IT DID NOT WORK OUT.

DANA ANDREWS was a wonderful actor, but he is just plain TOO OLD for this part, PLUS there is the baggage of his part in BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES from three years earlier- it's just too hard to buy the scenario and it's OVERKILL on the fact that WE KNOW THIS ROMANCE IS DOOMED. That said, he's great and it's understandable how SUSAN could lose her mind over him. ROBERT KEITH has the absolute best part as SUSAN'S FATHER, it's a wonderfully written part that an actor waits a lifetime to get, JESSIE ROYCE-LANDIS plays SUSAN'S mother and is terrific.

IT'S hard for me to think of another STAR FROM THE GOLDEN ERA where there is a greater disparity between the quality of their acting vs. the quality of the vehicles in which they appeared than MISS SUSAN HAYWARD. she most deservedly earned her SECOND BEST ACTRESS OSCAR NOMINATION for this, and if MY FOOLISH HEART had been a better film (it's too long and uneven, there ARE things that work, but they're mixed in with some bad dialogue and scenarios) HAYWARD might have been more of a threat to LOVELY LIVVIE DeHAVILLAND'S SECOND OSCAR, and as it was, the two of them were a lot better than some of the other sorry nominees from that strange year of 1949.

(I do say might tho, because OLIVIA is just THAT DAMN GOOD in THE HEIRESS she deserved it)

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Husbands Poster

Husbands (1970) 7/10

I just saw this in a revival theater, I had seen it many years ago on late night TV. It's a John Cassavetes directed film about 3 middle aged family men (Cassavetes, Ben Gazzara and Peter Falk) who go on a drunken international binge after one of their close friends dies.

I know Cassavetes more as an actor but I had seen a few of his directing efforts ("A Child Is Waiting", "Faces" and "A Woman Under The Influence"). If you are familiar with his work you will know what to expect from this film. I found often hilariously funny, much of the dialogue seemed improvised, the actors often break out laughing when listening to the other's speeches. One scene that really sticks out for me was when the trio are getting drunk in a bar with several of their friends and many sing songs that are close to them. We hear "Irish Eyes Are Smiling" and WWI songs like "Pack Up Your Troubles" and a very funny deadpan version of "Blood On The Saddle". The three guys go to London to continue their adventure but those scenes are not as good as the New York ones. The version I saw in the theater was 131 minutes long which is actually a shorter version than I saw years ago, which was 154 minutes. I am sure of this because the bar scene ran a lot longer in that one. 

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3 hours ago, midwestan said:

I watched most of "House of Strangers" Friday night during Susan Hayward's SUTS tribute.  Edward G. Robinson turns in a masterful performance as Gino Monetti, the Italian immigrant who has started up a neighborhood bank in New York City prior to the Wall Street crash of 1929.  When new banking regulations take effect, Robinson gets in hot water with bank examiners and is charged with fraud.  Three of Robinson's four sons pull a power play to have him take the fall so they can take over the 'new and improved' Monetti Bank.  Richard Conte, the only son who's not involved in the banking industry, but rather, a lawyer, still has a law office inside the bank.  Conte represents his father during the trial and makes a fateful decision to take the fall for his dad to keep him out of prison.  Conte's ploy works, and he's sent up for 7 years, but Robinson, while avoiding prison time, must give up control of his bank.

Once Robinson realizes he's been double-crossed by three of his sons (played by Luther Adler, Paul Valentine, and Efrem Zimbalist, Jr.), he mounts a campaign to have Conte exact revenge on his brothers by continually writing letters to his Sing-Sing son.  While Conte's in the jug, Robinson dies.  Conte is allowed to return home to see his dad laid out in the living room, then he sneers at his smug brothers and gestures his disdain for them.  All the while, Susan Hayward has fallen in love with Richard Conte before he gets convicted, and she proves to be as stubborn as he is over the family vendetta that Robinson has instilled in his son.  Conte wants revenge in the worst possible way, and he's just as bossy and demanding as his father was when he was alive.  Hayward basically gives him an ultimatum; ditch his plans for revenge on his brothers or she'll forever be 'forbidden fruit' when it comes to romance with him.

He finally sees the error of his ways.  His love for Hayward proves to be stronger than his hatred for his brothers.  But can he convince his siblings of his change of heart toward them?

Robinson wasn't even nominated for an Oscar as a lead or supporting actor in this film, but he received Best Actor for his role in "House of Strangers" at the Cannes Film Festival in 1949.  Overall, a very good picture that I'd like to see again.  Alas, it's not on TCM On Demand!  

Nice write-up for HOUSE IF STRANGERS.  I really like this film, and don’t understand why it didn’t make a bigger impact.  Although I vaguely remember reading that due to banking interests (B of A I think) approached the studio. and, since the rise of an Italian banker was similar to their own story, I think Fox May have curtailed the play-off dates in movie theaters.

Robinson is great, and I think that the fact that he was borrowed for this one role, meant that the studio didn’t put his name into consideration or actively campaign for an Oscar nod for him.

Richard Conte and Susan Hayward have palpable chemistry together, a sexual charge that leaves no one unsure that they are hot for each other.  Too bad they were never reteamed.

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41 minutes ago, Arturo said:

Nice write-up for HOUSE IF STRANGERS.  I really like this film, and don’t understand why it didn’t make a bigger impact.  Although I vaguely remember reading that due to banking interests (B of A I think) approached the studio. and, since the rise of an Italian banner was similar to their own story, I think Fox May have curtailed the play-off dates in movie theaters.

A LETTER TO THREE WIVES (from the same director and year) went over so well with The Academy- winning best director and screenplay. it seems like FOX appeased him by heavily promoting/ campaigning for it instead. (and successfully at that)

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Disciple of Death (1972)

I hadn't seen this film in decades. It has similarities to The Blood on Satan's Claw, made the previous year, but is far, far inferior to that great British folk-horror film (which btw is being shown next week at the Film Forum in New York, in a series of films selected by Martin Scorsese and Jay C ocks). 

Disciple of Death opens with a young couple (Ralph and Julia) in rural England meeting for a quick smooch in the forest. They pledge their love by cutting their fingers and mingling their blood. Alas for them, they are sitting on an old grave, and Julia is a virgin. A drop of her blood falls on the grave and disappears. The grave is a suicide's grave, and, as everyone knows, a suicide's grave is the pathway to the entrance of hell, and, through that gateway, a drop of a virgin's blood can release a demon from hell. The demon returns in human form (he was previously lord of the manor in the neighbourhood).

The demon -- played by Mike Raven --- proceeds to gather up the virgins in the vicinity. As he says, during a black mass: "My task on earth is to supply my master Satan with an endless line of virgin sacrifices unless I find a maiden willing to accept her death and spend eternity with me in my dark palace in the depths of hell."

Ralph (the young lover) and the local priest try to fight the demon, but they don't know how, which leads to the most surprising scene in the film. They seek the help of a Jewish Cabalist, making a journey to his hut. Here, in the middle of rural perhaps 17th Century England, they find an old man with a Jewish accent who tells them: "I'm not meshugganah." When he gives them three objects with which to fight the demon, the priest says, "Ah, three, the holy trinity." The Cabalist replies: "Trinity, shminity. This is your kosher, Yiddisher magic."

There is some gore in this film: the ripping out of a virgin's heart; and, later, a dwarf summoned from hell snacking on the parson's face. In the end, the demon is sent back to hell.

I love trashy horror films, but this is the lowest of the low, due largely to the awful acting. However, Nicholas Amer, who plays Melchisidech the Cabalist, is pretty good, and there are a few effective scenes. Source: YouTube.

99067-disciple-of-death-0-230-0-345-crop

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My Foolish Heart offers one of filmdom's most valuable life lessons: 

One must never, ever take an Idaho sales clerk's advice to wear a Brown & White buffalo checked, scoop necked gown to a fancy NY party, unless one knows you will meet someone who doesn't mind your rustic frontier inspired swing dress.

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7 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

My Foolish Heart offers one of filmdom's most valuable life lessons: 

One must never, ever take an Idaho sales clerk's advice to wear a Brown & White buffalo checked, scoop necked gown to a fancy NY party, unless one knows you will meet someone who doesn't mind your rustic frontier inspired swing dress.

OMG YES!!!! THANK YOU, I FORGOT TO BRING THIS UP, YOU ARE DOING THE LORD'S WORK IN MENTIONING IT!

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I DID NOT MENTION HOW TRULY HEE-HAW INSPIRED THAT HIDEOUS DRESS WAS! Dana probably deserved a nomination of his own for CONVINCINGLY LYING TO SUSAN that it wasn't ugly at all.

I was totally on the side of Miriam Whatserface or whoever the Mean Girl was. She was 110% right for telling you to your face that dress is UGLY, Susan, she is not your ENEMY, she is YOUR FRIEND. Listen to her and follow her into the ladies room with a pair of scissors if she offers.

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11 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

My Foolish Heart offers one of filmdom's most valuable life lessons: 

One must never, ever take an Idaho sales clerk's advice to wear a Brown & White buffalo checked, scoop necked gown to a fancy NY party, unless one knows you will meet someone who doesn't mind your rustic frontier inspired swing dress.

Having missed the movie, and just going by the print that was posted, How did you KNOW the dress was brown and white? :unsure:

Given both the posted still and the movie was shot in B&W, you must know something no one else does? :huh:

Sepiatone

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7 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I'm actually going to be really, really sorry when SUTS ends tonight.

It's close to the exact opposite feeling I get when March 4 rolls around.

This is what I enjoy about Summer Under The Stars.  We may not warm up to a particular actor or actress for a full 24-hour stretch, but I think most posters and lurkers on this website would find at least one or two movies they'd like to check out.  I'm not especially crazy about Marlon Brando, but I watched a couple of his films on his day, and I really liked "The Fugitive Kind", which I had never seen before.  Same can be said about Walter Brennan...I generally don't like his character portrayals, but I did like "Home In Indiana", which I had only seen once before, and even then I was only able to catch a few minutes of it, so this month's showing of that film may as well have been the first time watching for me.  On Audrey Hepburn's day, I think TCM started out strong by showing "Robin and Marian", "Green Mansions", "The Nun's Story", and "The Children's Hour".  This was followed by 4 better-known and critically acclaimed films which I regarded as clunkers!  So, to each his (or her) own, I guess.

Kudos to the TCM programmers this month...they really did a nice job with SUTS (and honestly, I think they do August very well since they stared doing this in 2003).

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My Foolish Heart example of how film differs from source material.

Salinger's Uncle Wiggley in Connecticut  Eloise says "You remember our freshman year, and I had that Brown and Yellow dress I bought in Boise and Miriam Ball told me nobody wore those kind of dresses in New York and I cried?"

Film:  Mary Jane says "I could have been the girl in the Brown and White dress."  But maybe she couldn't tell what color it really was.

I think substituting White for Yellow was the wise thing to do.

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33 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

My Foolish Heart example of how film differs from source material.

Salinger's Uncle Wiggley in Connecticut  Eloise says "You remember our freshman year, and I had that Brown and Yellow dress I bought in Boise and Miriam Ball told me nobody wore those kind of dresses in New York and I cried?"

Film:  Mary Jane says "I could have been the girl in the Brown and White dress."  But maybe she couldn't tell what color it really was.

I think substituting White for Yellow was the wise thing to do.

being 41, i was a little at a loss in re: the whole UNCLE WIGGLEY thing THAT CAME UP here and there in the story, but I HAVE ALWAYS REMEMBERED THAT TITLE from when I first read about the movie, i think THE GAME ITSELF had passed out of fashion before 1978.

I do recall CANDYLAND though.

SOUNDS WEIRD AS HELL THOUGH, and I bet SALINGER was PO'd they didn't use the title and opted instead for MY FOOLISH HEART,

ps- UNCLE WIGGLEY IN CONNECTICUT would make a great triple bill with THE CONSTANT NYMPH and THE LUSTY MEN!

I can just see the DISGUSTED PATRONS in TIMES SQUARE FURIOUSLY shredding their tickets and flipping off the marquee.

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On 8/31/2019 at 10:33 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

I'm actually going to be really, really sorry when SUTS ends tonight.

Y'know, they could carry on the same spirit throughout the year with different names.  Like FLUTS( Fallen Leaves Under The Stars for Autumn) ,  SBUTS( Sleigh Bells Under The Stars  ;) )  or too maybe, a "cabin fever" tie in for Winter......  

STUTS( Spring Time Under The Stars)  ;) 

Sepiatone

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41 minutes ago, Roy Cronin said:

You're right, Salinger hated the title and the entire movie for that matter.

But seriously,  what did he expect?  Maybe it would have been better to him with the originally cast Teresa Wright  

the thing is, MY FOOLISH HEART is THE PERFECT TITLE FOR THIS (AND a great title PERIOD.)

And of course- it gave us the song.

i'M SOMEWHAT (oops) curious about checking out the SALINGER STORY. I have never read anything by him.

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2 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

Y'know, they could carry on the same spirit throughout the year with different names.  Like FLUTS( Fallen Leaves Under The Stars for Autumn) ,  SBUTS( Sleigh Bells Under The Stars  ;) )  or too maybe, a "cabin fever" tie in for Winter......  

STUTS( Spring Time Under The Stars)  ;) 

Sepiatone

go big: 365 days under the stars.

aka "something bound to both p!ss off and make everyone happy  at some point."

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I also wiki'd UNCLE WIGGILY (the correct spelling, FYI!)- IT WAS A CHILDREN'S BOOK SERIES THAT SOUNDS LIKE THE SORT OF THING THAT A YOUNG JD SALINGER WOULD PROBABLY LIKE.

COPYING AND PASTING TO LET YOU ALL READ HOW WILD THIS IS:

I BOLDED THE ESPECIALLY MEMORABLE NAMES AND PASSAGES-

Characters and stories

Uncle Wiggily, an engaging elderly rabbit, is lame from rheumatism. Wherever he goes, he always relies on a red, white, and blue crutch—described as being "striped like a barber-pole", or, in later episodes, "his candy-striped walking cane", with spiral red and white striping like a peppermint candy stick.

Uncle Wiggily is only one of many recurring characters in the series. For example, the Pipsisewah[3] is an unsavory bully who appears as a rhinoceros-like creature. His head has a snout with two small horns and large, snorting nostrils; he wears a black, conical cloth hat and patched scarlet trousers, is somewhat stout, with a giraffe-skin body and bovine tail, and walks upright on two legs. As do the other characters, he has hands, but bears hooves for feet. He is normally accompanied by the crow-like Skeezicks,[4] in his tall red cap and red-and-yellow-striped suit, and the two of them rarely engage in anything other than mischief harmless to the other characters in the storyline. The Bazumpus, the Crozokus, and the Scuttlemagoon appear less frequently, but are just as outlandish as the aforementioned "Pip" and "Skee", and always require appropriate "handling" by Uncle Wiggily—often with the aid of his animal friends.

There are also several other "bad chaps" in the stories: the Woozy Wolf, Bushy Bear, Skillery Skallery Alligator and the fierce Bobcat, to name but a few. They all seem bent on nibbling the "souse" off Uncle Wiggily's ears, but he always escapes. In shorter, more formulaic stories, his escape is generally enabled by some implement he has just purchased at the store—often while on an errand for his muskrat housekeeper, Nurse Jane Fuzzy Wuzzy. For example, Uncle Wiggily once used an umbrella to foil the Skillery Skallery Alligator by thrusting it into the creature's mouth and opening it, thus preventing his biting the old gentleman rabbit.

Uncle Wiggily also encounters amicable animal characters from his neighborhood, such as Sammie and Susie Littletail (Uncle Wiggily's young nephew and niece); Lulu, Alice, and Jimmie Wibblewobble (duck children); Dr. Possum (local physician); Uncle Butter (goat); Charlie and Arabella Chick; Jackie and Peetie Bow-Wow; Billie and Johnnie Bushytail (squirrel boys); Joie, Tommie, and Kittie Kat; Jennie Chipmunk; Munchie Trot (pony boy); Dottie and Willie Lambkin; Neddie and Beckie Stubtail (friendly bear cubs); as well as many others. In shorter stories, we frequently find Uncle Wiggily helping various of these friends out of some kind of predicament just before one of the bad chaps enters the picture, intent on obtaining "ear-nibbles" from their hapless victims. In longer stories, Uncle Wiggily often is off on a camping trip or other extended journey with one of his friends, fending off repeated incursions or baffling mean-spirited pranks from a lurking villain or two—not uncommonly with the aid of his crutch or a "thing-a-ma-bob" he happens to have brought along in his satchel.

Selected bibliography

Howard Garis published 79 books of Uncle Wiggily stories. A few of these included:

  • Uncle Wiggily's Adventures (1912)
  • Uncle Wiggily's Travels (copyright 1913)
  • Uncle Wiggily's Fortune (copyright 1913)
  • Uncle Wiggily's Automobile (copyright 1913)
  • Uncle Wiggily's Airship (copyright 1915)
  • Uncle Wiggily in the Country (copyright 1916)
  • Uncle Wiggily on the Farm (copyright 1918)
  • Uncle Wiggily's Empty Watch (copyright 1919) — three short stories
  • Uncle Wiggily's Fishing Trip (copyright 1919) — three short stories
  • Uncle Wiggily Goes Swimming (copyright 1919) — three short stories
  • Uncle Wiggily Indian Hunter (copyright 1919) — three short stories
  • Uncle Wiggily's Holidays (copyright 1919) — three short stories
  • Uncle Wiggily in Fairyland (Uncle Wiggily Arabian Nights) (copyright 1922)
  • Uncle Wiggily Book (copyright 1927) — published as a school reading book
  • Uncle Wiggily and Friends (copyright 1939)
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