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ALSO ALSO ALSO ALSO,

If they had released MY FOOLISH HEART under the title UNCLE WIGGILY IN CONNECTICUT, something tells me the matinee show would be a mass of sobbing children  by about five minutes in to SUSAN HAYWARD'S drunken raving.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

being 41, i was a little at a loss in re: the whole UNCLE WIGGLEY thing THAT CAME UP here and there in the story, but I HAVE ALWAYS REMEMBERED THAT TITLE from when I first read about the movie, i think THE GAME ITSELF had passed out of fashion before 1978.

I do recall CANDYLAND though.

SOUNDS WEIRD AS HELL THOUGH, and I bet SALINGER was PO'd they didn't use the title and opted instead for MY FOOLISH HEART,

ps- UNCLE WIGGLEY IN CONNECTICUT would make a great triple bill with THE CONSTANT NYMPH and THE LUSTY MEN!

I can just see the DISGUSTED PATRONS in TIMES SQUARE FURIOUSLY shredding their tickets and flipping off the marquee.

I’m a few years younger than you (35) and I totally remember playing the Uncle Wiggly board game!! I didn’t own it, but I had a friend that did. This was probably in the late 80s. Why I (a preschooler) would remember playing this game, I have no idea. I don’t really remember much about it, except for the uncle wiggly playing pieces and I remember liking the illustrations on the game board. 

I also owned Candy Land.  It was always such a rush to get the snowflake card right off the bat and be almost done with the game in like 5 mins.  I also recall getting stuck in Gloppy’s molasses swamp a lot. 

 

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I actually really LIKED the "look" of MOLASSES SWAMP, in fact, I always tried to end up there.

I've always been drawn to the dark side...

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6 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ALSO ALSO ALSO ALSO,

If they had released MY FOOLISH HEART under the title UNCLE WIGGILY IN CONNECTICUT, something tells me the matinee show would be a mass of sobbing children  by about five minutes in to SUSAN HAYWARD'S drunken raving.

I assume calling it "The Brown and Yellow Dress" would have been totally out 

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1 minute ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I actually really LIKED the "look" of MOLASSES SWAMP, in fact, I always tried to end up there.

I've always been drawn to the dark side...

It definitely seems better than being lost for days in the Lollipop Forest. I always liked Queen Frostine. She seemed so glamorous.  Lol. 

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this is the version of MOLASSES SWAMP i played with (it's since been updated in the modern version to include a character named GLOOPY)

Looks nice doesn't it? Those reeds add some greenery. Looks like a soothing place to take a good book.

da7c2fb9934ec1e372291b43076c8de7.jpg

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The Maze (1953, 3-D print). Directed by William Cameron Menzies.

The film opens with an image of a maze, forbidding music, and a sign that says “Keep Out.” The next scene is a bleak room in a Scottish castle, where a man is dying. One of the servants says that someone must be sent for. The next scene takes place in Cannes, France, where three British people — Richard Carlson (Gerald), Veronica Hurst (Kitty), Katherine Emery (Edith) —  are enjoying a holiday. Gerald and Kitty are to marry in two weeks; Edith is Kitty’s aunt. Suddenly, the holiday mood is upset by a cable Gerald receives from Scotland, where his uncle is apparently a baronet and lord of a remote castle. Gerald is presumably his heir. The cable alludes to a crisis and says come quickly. Gerald has not seen his uncle since childhood. Gerald leaves, saying he’ll be in touch asap, although it is reported that the castle is devoid of all modern technology, including a telephone and electricity.
 
Weeks go by, and no news of Gerald. Kitty and Edith begin to worry and decide to go to the castle. When they arrive, an angry Gerald, whose hair has turned gray, tells them they must leave. The ladies are determined to stay and find out what’s wrong. Their rooms are locked at night, from the outside. During the night, Kitty hears voices, and something shuffling in the corridor.  Although they are ordered to leave in the morning, Aunt Edith feigns a bad cold, so they have to stay another night. Kitty wants to help her fiancé, thinking he is ill, and smuggles a letter out, inviting some of their friends to come to the castle. Since Kitty fears that Gerald is very sick, one of the friends she invites is a doctor.
 
Aunt Edith hides outside her room the following night, so that when her room is locked, she can explore the house. She goes up a staircase with unusually flat stairs (“like pedestals”) and enters a room. She sees something scurrying across the floor, screams, and faints. Gerald and his two mysterious servants take her back to her room. There is talk among Gerald and the servants about something terrible that happened to the cleaning lady, who entered the maze outside the house. Gerald tells his servants that they’ll have to clean the house themselves, or if they must hire someone, don’t hire a woman.
 
The next day, Kitty sees a book called “Teratology” lying around and starts to read it, but it is grabbed out of her hand by one of the servants. (Teratology evidently refers to the study of monsters and deformities.) The friends whom Kitty invited arrive, which makes Gerald even more upset. After dinner, Gerald orders them to their rooms and tells them their rooms will be locked. The doctor friend, who has a gun, fears Richard is certifiable. Aunt Edith steals a key, so that she and Kitty can explore the maze during the night.
 
In the maze, Edith and Kitty are separated. Edith sees the creature, who is actually a big frog. She screams and faints. Kitty then sees the frog and screams. The frog is upset by all this commotion, and scurries through the maze, back into the house, up the stairs, and into his room, from which he jumps out of the window.
 
The next morning, Gerald gathers the guests and calmly explains that his uncle was born two hundred years ago. During gestation, the embryo developed from a tadpole stage into a sort of frog. Gerald further explained that his uncle was kind, and didn’t want to scare anyone. Because he was mortified at having upset the ladies, he jumped out of the window. Gerald explains that one of the very few pleasures his uncle enjoyed was being taken for a swim every night, in the pond, which is in the middle of the maze. 
 
The film ends with Aunt Edith addressing the viewing audience, telling us that Kitty and Gerald married and lived happily in the modernized castle.
 
The Maze is pretty effective at conveying a sense of moodiness and creepiness, although when we've been set up to expect the arrival of a terrifying creature for most of the film, the appearance of a frog is a bit of a letdown. But the newly restored 3-D print is amazing, especially when the frog seems to jump out into the audience. 
 
There are holes in the plot. What happened to the cleaning lady? Why did Gerald's hair turn gray? Why did all the caretaker nephews die young? How did the frog manage to live 200 years?  How did the frog manage to get nephews?
 
The Maze was part of a series of films selected by Martin Scorsese and Joe C_ocks, at the Film Forum in NYC (August 15-September 5). It was introduced by film restorer Robert Furmanek, founder of 3-D film archive.
 
maze3.jpg
 
maze_screencap.jpg?w=584
 
 

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6 hours ago, Swithin said:

The Maze (1953, 3-D print). Directed by William Cameron Menzies.

The Maze was part of a series of films selected by Martin Scorsese and Joe C_ocks, at the Film Forum in NYC (August 15-September 5). It was introduced by film restorer Robert Furmanek, founder of 3-D film archive.
 

And, for those who missed it, Furmanek's 3-D print restoration was created for 3D Blu-ray disk:  https://www.amazon.com/Maze-3-D-Blu-ray-Richard-Carlson/dp/B079PHFH4X/

Of course, if you happen to have missed 3DTV when it was around, um, can't help ya.  😎

(And the "Hi ho!" frog is a bit of a major SPOILER--It is, shall we say, not what the script was leading us to expect.  Admit it, you go into the story wondering "Aha, they're hiding an ancient Greek minotaur on the estate?"...)

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Three HBO films over the weekend:

Laguna Heat (1987)

Laguna Heat Poster

Directed by Simon Langton. written by D.M. Eyr, Pete Hamill, David Burton Morris, and based on a T. Jefferson Parker novel. A decent noir-ish murder mystery starring Harry Hamlin, Jason Robards, Rip Torn, Catherine Hicks, Anne Francis, James Gammon, Jeff Kober, and Dehl Berti. Nice print streaming. 7/10

The Glitter Dome (1984) 

The Glitter Dome Poster

Director: Stuart Margolin, Written by Stanley Kallis, based on Joseph Wambaugh's novel. Starring James Garner, Margot Kidder, John Lithgow, John Marley, Stuart Margolin, and Colleen Dewhurst.

Neo Noir-ish film about two LAPD partners disillusioned wisecracking alcoholic, Al Mackey (Garner), and emotionally wimpy Marty Wellborn (Lithgow), are homicide cops in Hollywood hot on the trail of the murderer of a movie mogul who was moonlighting by making child porno pictures. This is a good film with a crappy print, it must also be a copy of a PAL VHS tape since the whole film seems slightly sped up. You really notice Garner sounding a bit to higher pitched than normal. 7/10 maybe more with a decent print.

Third Degree Burn (1989)

Third Degree Burn Poster

Directed by Roger Spottiswoode. An ex Seattle Police Detective Treat Williams working as a PI is supposedly hired by a rich businessman Richard Masur, to find out or not his beautiful wife Virginia Madsen is fooling around behind his back. A decent story with a nice twist. Again another crappy VHS print streaming. Seattle and Tuscon location work. Needs a better print a 6-7/10.

 

 

 

 
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25 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

The Glitter Dome Poster

Director: Stuart Margolin, Written by Stanley Kallis, based on Joseph Wambaugh's novel. Starring James Garner, Margot Kidder, John Lithgow, John Marley, Stuart Margolin, and Colleen Dewhurst.

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE ACTOR?

I hate that MARGOT KIDDER had such terrible demons, she was a fascinating actress with a real 1940's LEADING LADY SPIRIT about her.

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

THE ACTOR?

I hate that MARGOT KIDDER had such terrible demons, she was a fascinating actress with a real 1940's LEADING LADY SPIRIT about her.

Yes he also plays a movie mogul.

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I'll be honest, he always kind of got on my nerves. (MARGOLIN)

While he had a limited range, I always enjoyed his roles.  Of course he was best (probably) in the Rockford Files.  He also had something to do with Love, American Style TV series.  Producer and/or director maybe.  He also starred in many of them.

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14 minutes ago, TheCid said:

While he had a limited range, I always enjoyed his roles.  Of course he was best (probably) in the Rockford Files.

He was an angel.

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Stuart Margolin made a marvelous contribution to The Rockford Files as a despicable coniving little weaselly con artist, and more than a bit of a coward, who would leave Jimmy Rockford out to dry any time it served his purpose. The actor was oily and funny simultaneously in the role of Angel Martin, and had a gift for dialogue delivery. The only question was why Rockford continued to put up with him.

Margolin, by the way, had earlier been featured in another television series starring James Garner, Nichols. After Garner's death Margolin said that he had been better to him than any other man outside of his father.

hqdefault.jpg

 

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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I'll be honest, he always kind of got on my nerves. (MARGOLIN)

An actor from that film that I don't particularly like on stage or screen is John Lithgow.

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6 hours ago, Swithin said:

An actor from that film that I don't particularly like on stage or screen is John Lithgow.

About 10-15 years ago, Mr Lithgow stole my shopping cart at Whole Foods. When I saw it was him I told him that I liked him as Don Quixote. It was a lie, I haven't even seen it. Anyway, Swithin, if he steals my shopping cart again, I'll tell him you said that.

:lol:

//

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1 hour ago, laffite said:

About 10-15 years ago, Mr Lithgow stole my shopping cart at Whole Foods. When I saw it was him I told him that I liked him as Don Quixote. It was a lie, I haven't even seen it. Anyway, Swithin, if he steals my shopping cart again, I'll tell him you said that.

Don't worry, you're safe--Lithgow's actually...pretty good as Don Quixote:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5WR7ducy0rU

And Bob Hoskins does a darn good Sancho Panza, while they're at it.

(Of course, Mr. Magoo was my first and best exposure to Don, but Lithgow's a good second.)

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Finally got around to watch "Braveheart" (1995) Sunday night.  Never was interested in the movie thinking it was just another generic medieval flick until the "What on Earth" TV series said it was based on William Wallace.  Was discussing landscape features, castles regarding him and the legendary King Author.

MPW-35017

 

 

Since nothing else was on, why not.  Movie is good with a couple of humorous scenes.  Longshanks tossing that so called military tactics know-it-all out the window was a riot. :lol:

 

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8 hours ago, laffite said:

About 10-15 years ago, Mr Lithgow stole my shopping cart at Whole Foods. When I saw it was him I told him that I liked him as Don Quixote. It was a lie, I haven't even seen it. Anyway, Swithin, if he steals my shopping cart again, I'll tell him you said that.

:lol:

//

As long as you didn't have a child in the cart at the time.

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8 hours ago, laffite said:

About 10-15 years ago, Mr Lithgow stole my shopping cart at Whole Foods. When I saw it was him I told him that I liked him as Don Quixote. It was a lie, I haven't even seen it. Anyway, Swithin, if he steals my shopping cart again, I'll tell him you said that.

:lol:

//

He's a highly respected actor, I just have never been a fan. I've seen him on stage and screen. Btw, which Whole Foods? I'm headed to the one in Columbus Circle this morning, but that's probably not the one you mean, since I don't think it has been there for that long. I'll watch out for him, in case he tries to steal my cart (although I tend to use a basket, so he'll have to pry it out of my hands.)

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16 hours ago, Swithin said:

An actor from that film that I don't particularly like on stage or screen is John Lithgow.

The only time I've ever liked JOHN LITHGOW is when he won something like his THIRD EMMY IN A ROW for the TV SHOW THIRD ROCK FROM THE SUN which- in spite of having its fans- was THE WORST SHOW ON TV AT THE TIME, and in his speech he basically said "I DON'T KNOW WHY YOU KEEP GIVING ME THESE, I THINK WHAT I DO IN THIS SHOW IS ABSOLUTELY AWFUL."

If they could give Emmys for Emmy speeches, he'd've gotten my vote (even though CANDACE BERGEN would probably win because it was 90'S EMMY LAW that she had to win every time she was nominated)

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2 hours ago, Swithin said:

He's a highly respected actor, I just have never been a fan. I've seen him on stage and screen. Btw, which Whole Foods? I'm headed to the one in Columbus Circle this morning, but that's probably not the one you mean, since I don't think it has been there for that long. I'll watch out for him, in case he tries to steal my cart (although I tend to use a basket, so he'll have to pry it out of my hands.)

Well, if he does steal your cart I hope he doesn't repair to my Whole Fields, which is cool 3,000 miles away. He was in San Diego doing Dirty Rotten Scoundrels.

Speaking of Columbus Circle, here is another true life adventure. In 1985 I was sitting in a coffee shop there and was nearly mistaken for Charles Bronson. There were three very young men (about 20 maybe) sitting in a booth cross the way who were in a flurry of excitement because they thought they were looking at a big star. "Is that Charles Bronson?" They debated the issue for a few frantic moments before deciding, "Nah, that ain't him." It was flattering there for a moment. but I knew where they were coming from. I had a face that might be termed ruggedly good looking, a sort of wrinkly gravity to my countenance. I had been in a Community Theater production in San Diego the year before and I was described as "a shaggy, likeable actor." Shaggy? Well, sort of. I guess. Anyway, that's what they were responding too. But I had nothing like a real Charles Bronson, that steely gaze, the presence, nor the charisma. Shucks, I was sorry they didn't come over. I wanted to give them my autograph anyway. ///

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10 hours ago, EricJ said:

Don't worry, you're safe--Lithgow's actually...pretty good as Don Quixote

I think I should be pardoned for my lie because it was virtually truth since though I hadn't seen it, I had seen stills and perhaps the trailer and thought he certainly cut a fine Don. But I have the impression that it was a flop, but I don't even know.

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