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speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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9 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Intolerance uses multiple color tints.

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Think it was used to tell the separate stories. The use there is understandable.

Let me emphasis, multi-tint is OK if properly applied.

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2 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

According to Wikipedia, the score was actually commissioned by TCM when the film was restored and first shown in 2000.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cleopatra_(1912_film)#Status

TCM sponsored (or had something to do with) a composer's competition for scoring silents some years back. I really loved that, such an ambitious project, and probably very expensive. The score from The Temptress I remember liking, especially the beginning sequences.

King Lear (1912) has a few scenes that had three-color scheme that was pretty good. But that's not tinting. I find tinting in silents distracting. It might very well been impressive back then.

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I didn't watch Cleopatra (1912), but I know you're (Hamradio) not the first around here to say that it was bad. I would have to keep it in context of its time. I know you mentioned another short film from the same year, but you can't really compare features and shorts. I do know that Cleopatra was made before Griffith's The Birth of a Nation, which really changed the language of cinema profoundly, so I usually look at movies made before it with that in mind. A lot of them were just static shots of the stage, with no close-ups or edits or multiple angles, etc.

That being said, I'm still not sorry that I missed it!

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The Mummy's Tomb (1942)

Universal's second Kharis film in the Mummy series, and the first of three outings as the mummified one for Lon Chaney Jr..

There's a lot of predictability with this "B" though fans of the genre may still be willing the forgive the film's obvious weaknesses. This time Kharis is imported into the United States (Massachusetts, in fact), along with an Egyptian high priest, to seek vengeance on those who had desecrated the grave of the Princess Ananka 30 years before.

The film's first ten minutes or so is a studio cost cutting reprise of the previous Mummy film (The Mummy's Hand, with Tom Tyler in the title role). Dick Foran and Wallace Ford, who had played the American archeologists in the previous outing, are brought back to the series in old men makeup, both of them on the target list for extermination by the high priest (played by Turban Bey in what the actor called the favourite film of his career).

George Zucco (who took one long tumble down a flight of stone stairs after getting shot at the end of The Mummy's Hand) returns to inspire Bey to get those persons who had defiled the tomb. Zucco is always fun to watch (he gets to play a trembling old geezer this go round), and Bey brings swarthy skinned eloquence to his role as the high priest.

Not too surprisingly, he eventually gets a case of the Egyptian hots for the girlfriend (Elsye Knox) of a son of one of the grave defilers and wants Kharis to kidnap her so he can turn her into a high priestess. And, yes, as in the previous film when Zucco had similar designs upon leading lady Peggy Moran, a strapped down Knox will have the opportunity at one point to tell Bey that he is mad.

Mummys-Tomb-The_main.jpg

Oh, yes, right out of the Frankenstein films, there are also some angry villagers here with burning torches. The difference this time is that these villagers are American.

The Mummy's Tomb is clearly one of the lesser efforts in the Mummy series, vastly inferior to the fun and atmospheric The Mummy's Hand. Lon Chaney hated playing the role of the Mummy and you can see why. He doesn't have all that much to do except drag one foot behind him in Mummy attire at night time and strangle a few people or cart off a girl. Chaney also despised the hours it took for makeup artist Jack Pierce to apply the full body Mummy makeup.

Mummy die hearts will probably enjoy this film well enough but the Mummy films had clearly seen better days.

SPOILER ALERT: I always enjoyed the light hearted, breezy chemistry between Foran and Ford in The Mummy's Hand, and resented seeing their characters revived in this sequel, only to play a couple of old guys who meet nasty ends.

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2 out of 4

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4 hours ago, TomJH said:

theda+bara+9.jpg

I feel like the real Cleopatra wouldn't be caught dead in a poor man's slave Princess Leia costume. 

I think my favorite part of this photo is the deranged look in Cleopatra's eyes.

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1 minute ago, speedracer5 said:

I feel like the real Cleopatra wouldn't be caught dead in a poor man's slave Princess Leia costume. 

Yeh, but the real Cleopatra wasn't trying to sell movie tickets.

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Just now, TomJH said:

Yeh, but the real Cleopatra wasn't trying to sell movie tickets.

She didn't need to, she was a Queen. Lol. 

I guess costuming in the 1910s wasn't what it was even 10 years later.  That "bra" is just really ugly. 

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4 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

She didn't need to, she was a Queen. Lol. 

I guess costuming in the 1910s wasn't what it was even 10 years later.  That "bra" is just really ugly. 

It gets your attention.

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3 hours ago, hamradio said:

Tinted film suppose to be properly used.

Blue to imitate a night scene like in "The Phantom Carriage"

Red for fire.

Green to reflect the ghoulish atmosphere like in "The Golem".

And Gold to reflect outdoor daylight, history or flashback.

I remember when purists (including those new audiences too young to have seen many restored silent movies) howled over the adding of songs, and occasional neon or moving clouds, to "Giorgio Moroder's 'Metropolis'", and, as if that weren't bad enough, complained "Ted Turner must have gotten his hands on the print...They COLORIZED it!"

...Err, no.  Somebody needs to do a little more research.  😓

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6 hours ago, TomJH said:

The Mummy's Tomb (1942)

 

The Mummy's Tomb is clearly one of the lesser efforts in the Mummy series, vastly inferior to the fun and atmospheric The Mummy's Hand

 

Agreed. Also, the subsequent films, while still entertaining, suffer from romantic leads who are not very interesting.

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Ruby (1992)

Sherilyn Fenn and Danny Aiello in Ruby (1992)

This really really could have been an interesting flick if it had really stuck to the facts or gone the other route and over the top burlesqued the whole story a la a James Ellroy novel. 

As is it's pretty tepid. Danny Aiello, Sherilyn Fenn and Film Noir vet Marc Lawrence. Watchable 6/10

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The Milky Way (1934) & The Cat's Paw (1934) - 👍/👎

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Found both of these on a (now OOP) big disc volume-boxset of Harold Lloyd at the library--Which I had rented for the silent shorts, but since two of the early Talkie features were included, thought I should take a look at for completism.  Lloyd was ahead of his time in adjusting his character to the sound era, and in retaining the rights to his films (in the day when studios thought the public "wouldn't go for" silents anymore), and although Milky is one of the ancient traditional Public Domain favorites, the Lloyd Estate still had it in good condition for the disk collection.

I'd only seen the 1946 Danny Kaye The Kid From Brooklyn version of Milky, so I knew the story, as Adolphe Menjou plays up milkman Harold accidentally knocking out the middleweight Champ into a fixed series of fights.  And what strikes the viewer is that--unlike poor Buster Keaton, or Charlie Chaplin's Tramp suddenly sounding like an English butler in "The Great Dictator"--Lloyd was perfectly cast in playing the nice likable sound version of his nebbishy Clark-Kent hero, even if he was getting a little too old to play the young twenty-something go-getter of "Safety Last".  The script was based on a then-hit play, and director Leo McCarey, who would try to wrangle the Marx Brothers two years later in "Duck Soup", handles the right mix of the play's Front Page-esque late-20's rapid-fire wisecrack snark, and Lloyd's own physical comedy, as a "fighter" with an amazingly developed personal talent for ducking punches.  (And, like all Lloyd characters, his embarrassingly ambitious delusions of grandeur once a few fixed fights go to his head.)  I may have only two to judge from, but if you had to see ONE Harold Lloyd talkie out of curiosity to see how the sound era treated him, this is the one that will relieve the most worry.

The same, sadly, cannot be said of The Cat's Paw, where Lloyd's own standby silent director/scriptwriter Sam Taylor tried to adapt the typical silent story to the big-city rapid-fire snark of stage-based early talkie comedies.  Here, Lloyd plays a missionary who's grown up in a sleepy Chinese village, and has never seen civilization since childhood, has to come to the city for business, only to be wrapped up in a crooked scheme to run for mayor.  (And, after the usual comic misunderstanding, winning.)  We're supposed to find his character innocent and Capra-esque, as he faces every fish-out-of-water situation with "quotations from Ling Po" ("One of them C**** sayings", his antagonists grumble way too many times in the script), but instead comes off SO gratingly clueless and unaware, it's downright pathetic.  In every Lloyd comedy, there's the climactic moment of Pathos, where he suddenly discovers that everyone had been laughing behind his back all along--But here, the big-city folks, including wisecrack-spewing "romantic" interest Una Merkel, are incredibly unpleasant, rarely laughing behind his back, and spending the rest of the movie as straw-man symbols of corruption.  ("You can't fire the commissioner, what about our sweet graft??") But even this pales before a jawdropping last act, where, in a "Gabriel Over the White House"-like act, Lloyd, on his last day before being framed for corruption, has the police round up every single gangster in town without probable cause, so he can clean up the town "his" way by having his Chinatown friends threaten them with ancient tortures in the antique store's basement.  It's meant to be the silent hero's unique way of resolving a situation, but if we weren't already sympathizing with the mean folks laughing at Harold's character, now we're sympathizing with their terror that he's finally snapped nuts.  (And who does THAT sound like with approaching Impeachment, folks?...)

I've been watching more Lloyd realizing he was ahead of his time in appreciating the changing film industry (and a big fan of 3-D years before it became a Thing), but I've still got that copy of "Mad Wednesday" to track down at the library.  As much as "Cat's Paw" tried to suggest some Great McGinty-style Preston Sturges farce, I have the feeling that Sturges came in right at the point that Lloyd left.

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1 hour ago, scsu1975 said:

Agreed. Also, the subsequent films, while still entertaining, suffer from romantic leads who are not very interesting.

Well, it's always the villains that are more interesting in films of this kind. One of the main redeeming features of the last film in the Mummy series, The Mummy's Ghost, was the stunning beauty of Ramsay Ames as the lady in distress. This film, though, would have the grimmest ending for any of the leading ladies.

the-mummys-ghost-1944-05.jpg

116ffa1ce3b364d72ab70f9b14744de0.jpg

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

Well, it's always the villains that are more interesting in films of this kind. One of the main redeeming features of the last film in the Mummy series, The Mummy's Ghost, was the stunning beauty of Ramsay Ames as the lady in distress. This film, though, would have the grimmest ending for any of the leading ladies.

the-mummys-ghost-1944-05.jpg

116ffa1ce3b364d72ab70f9b14744de0.jpg

Actually, the last film in the series is The Mummy's Curse, which inexplicably shifts the locale to Louisiana. The lovely Virginia Christine plays the reincarnated Ananka. The scene where she rises from the swamp is probably the highlight of the film - unless you count the brief appearance of former silent star Bill Farnum, who gets choked out by Kharis.

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10 hours ago, scsu1975 said:

Actually, the last film in the series is The Mummy's Curse, which inexplicably shifts the locale to Louisiana. The lovely Virginia Christine plays the reincarnated Ananka. The scene where she rises from the swamp is probably the highlight of the film - unless you count the brief appearance of former silent star Bill Farnum, who gets choked out by Kharis.

My mistake then. It's been a while since I saw The Mummy's Curse but it sounds like it starts off where Mummy's Ghost left off. I'll have to give it a look see, if only for the scene that you mentioned.

the-mummys-curse-1944-04.jpg

Call me an Egyptian sentimentalist, if you will, but I don't know why the Chaney Kharis series had to switch its locale to America. Curious, isn't it, that only two of the five Mummy films made by Universal were set in the land of the pyramids. That's one of many reasons I like the Karloff original and The Mummy's Hand more, if only for the atmosphere that comes with their settings.

 

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22 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951)

I finally watched this classic sci-fi film months after we had the thread about it.  I'm not a big sci-fi fan, but I wanted to give this film a chance because of its status as being an acclaimed sci-fi film.  I like Michael Rennie, though I've only seen him in one other film: Dangerous Crossing. I also like Patricia Neal, I thought she was excellent in A Face in the Crowd and Breakfast at Tiffany's. 

Anyway, I'm happy to say that I really enjoyed this film.  Aside from the alien, robot and space ship, the film didn't read like a typical science fiction film that bores me to tears. It had many noir and dramatic elements. I thought Rennie was fantastic as Klaatu and I especially enjoyed his scenes with Billy Gray.  I'm not a big fan of child actors, but I really like Gray. I recognized him immediately as the actor who plays Doris Day's brother, Wesley, in On Moonlight Bay and By the Light of the Silvery Moon.  Gray is one of the best parts of both of these films.  I also liked the other supporting cast members: Sam Jaffe (whom I recognized from The Asphalt Jungle), Francis "Aunt Bee" Bavier who looked younger, but sounded exactly like the Aunt Bee we all know and love. I also loved how bossy she was.  I kept hoping for Andy Griffith to walk in and tell her "Just call the man!" Hugh Marlowe whom I recognized as Lloyd from All About Eve rounded out the cast as Neal's boyfriend. 

I was fascinated by the spaceship and robot. I loved the seamless look of the spaceship. I loved the look of the robot. The special effects were excellent. I also loved Rennie's sparkly alien outfit. 

The best thing about this film is the message. I took the message as a plea for world peace in the context of the Cold War. The mass media's fear mongering tactics used to increase xenophobia--the fear of outsiders.  This theme is very relevant today.  When Klaatu emerges from his space ship, the humans' first instinct is violence. Throughout the entire film, a manhunt is underway, looking for Klaatu.  Just the presence of the spaceship and the robot is worrisome for the humans. The theme of using violence as a means for peace seems very contradictory and I liked that Klaatu pointed that out.  I also liked the idea that even if only a small portion of people are utilizing weaponry to try and establish dominance, the violence affects everyone--which is mainly what Klaatu is concerned about.

This was a very powerful film, one that I enjoyed very much.

I also loved this poster for the film.  In no way, shape, or form does this slip-clad woman ever appear in this film. What's with the gorilla hand clutching the earth? I want this poster for my house!

Image result for the day the earth stood still

Somewhere on IMDB is a thread about this film that is hilarious. Couldn't find it though.

Here's a link to some of the goofs in the film. 

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0043456/goofs/?tab=gf&ref_=tt_trv_gf

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1 hour ago, TomJH said:

Call me an Egyptian sentimentalist, if you will, but I don't know why the Chaney Kharis series had to switch its locale to America. Curious, isn't it, that only two of the five Mummy films made by Universal were set in the land of the pyramids. That's one of many reasons I like the Karloff original and The Mummy's Hand more, if only for the atmosphere that comes with their settings.

 

Maybe Universal figured that by moving the remaining mummy films to America, there would be more "chills." Egypt was so far away ... but now the monster was on our doorstep. Look out! There is no escaping a lumbering slow-paced gauze-wrapped creature!

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6 minutes ago, scsu1975 said:

Maybe Universal figured that by moving the remaining mummy films to America, there would be more "chills." Egypt was so far away ... but now the monster was on our doorstep. Look out! There is no escaping a lumbering slow-paced gauze-wrapped creature!

Well, lots of films we enjoy are set "so far away." And for a mummy film to be set in the land in which he was buried seems pretty acceptable to me. Plus, Egypt is so much more "exotic" a setting. Oh, well, the Chaneys were set in the U.S., like it or not.

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22 hours ago, TomJH said:

Call me an Egyptian sentimentalist, if you will, but I don't know why the Chaney Kharis series had to switch its locale to America.

Could it be part of the idea of disturbing the Mummy's rest by moving him? I'd surely walk the earth in distress if exhumed.

My 90 year old Mother has been my house guest for 2 weeks. Last night I ran BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY '18 for her because she loved Queen and especially Freddie Mercury. She was enraptured with the story and loved the film, it was a great choice.

I however, had a few problems with it. Everyone had buzzed about how great Rami Malek is as Freddy, well I disliked his portrayal. I thought the prosthetic teeth were ill fitting, distracting and made him look goofy-especially when singing. While Malek did an ok job of imitating Mercury, if you've watched the real Mercury perform, he was much more vibrant, snappy, a master of movement. I know Malek was trained to imitate Mercury's gestures & movement, but he came off blander than Mercury on stage.

I also called foul on the recording studio scenes. "Bohemian Rhapsody" was not Queen's first foray into operatic sounding songs-there was pretty much ONE per album-just like there was a happy "show tune" type song every album and a hard rock song every album. Just "Rhapsody" is the only song familiar to those whom only know Queen's radio hits.

It was fun however to hear so many references to one of my favorite Queen songs-Roger Taylor's "I'm In Love With My Car". Every reference made Mom laugh even though she isn't familiar with it. The actors chosen to portray Brian May, Roger Taylor & John Deacon were pretty spot on though. And I recognized all their performance costumes. 

It's a good film for most people who don't know anything about the band or Freddy's personal story, obviously events were successfully condensed/altered to create a good story arc.

220px-Bohemian_Rhapsody_poster.png

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I heard they downplayed his homosexuality in the film, how was it handled?

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Big Trouble in Little China (1986)

So I've been on a binge of cult/camp classic 80s and 90s movies.  After watching another episode of '90210' on my re-watch of the series, we switched gears to movies. Big Trouble in Little China was my husband's movie pick last night. 

This movie definitely fit the bill when it came to cult/camp classic. 

Kurt Russell stars as Jack Burton, a long haul truck driver who ends up getting caught up in this bizarre fight in San Francisco's Chinatown district. As an aside, for someone who makes his living as a semi truck driver, never once does he have a trailer hooked up to his rig.  What exactly is he hauling? I guess I can assume he picked up a trailer from his origin point, dropped the trailer off at his destination, and now is driving through San Francisco enroute to pick up another trailer to bring somewhere else? Who knows. 

Anyway, Russell gets caught up in this crazy conflict in Chinatown involving a Chinese prince/crime lord. It seems that the prince/crime lord have kidnapped Russell's friend's fiancee--a beautiful green-eyed Chinese woman. It seems that the a green-eyed woman is the key to removing an ancient curse that keeps the prince/crimelord immortal and flesh-less. Kim Cattrall from Mannequin fame, appears as a green-eyed American woman who I guess just lives in Chinatown and knows all about the conflict.  Cattrall's green eyes end up attracting the interest of the Chinese prince/crime lord who decides to kidnap her as well, thinking that he can offer her up as tribute to the god who placed the ancient curse on him, then the green-eyed Chinese woman will live out her life as his unwilling wife.

Anyway, this movie was ridiculous and absurd in all the best ways-- lots of extended gymnastics tumbling scenes, overly long airborne sword fights, people jumping much higher than they should be able to, a monster with an eyeball on the end of his tongue, Russell getting his boot knife stuck in a guy's body, blinding lasers coming out of people's mouths, lightning strikes emanating from people's bodies... this movie has everything.

I loved this movie. It was bonkers in all the right ways.

I also want to own Kurt Russell's amazing tank top that he wears in this film. 

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9 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Big Trouble in Little China (1986)

So I've been on a binge of cult/camp classic 80s and 90s movies.  After watching another episode of '90210' on my re-watch of the series, we switched gears to movies. Big Trouble in Little China was my husband's movie pick last night. 

This movie definitely fit the bill when it came to cult/camp classic. 

Kurt Russell stars as Jack Burton, a long haul truck driver who ends up getting caught up in this bizarre fight in San Francisco's Chinatown district. As an aside, for someone who makes his living as a semi truck driver, never once does he have a trailer hooked up to his rig.  What exactly is he hauling? I guess I can assume he picked up a trailer from his origin point, dropped the trailer off at his destination, and now is driving through San Francisco enroute to pick up another trailer to bring somewhere else? Who knows. 

Anyway, Russell gets caught up in this crazy conflict in Chinatown involving a Chinese prince/crime lord. It seems that the prince/crime lord have kidnapped Russell's friend's fiancee--a beautiful green-eyed Chinese woman. It seems that the a green-eyed woman is the key to removing an ancient curse that keeps the prince/crimelord immortal and flesh-less. Kim Cattrall from Mannequin fame, appears as a green-eyed American woman who I guess just lives in Chinatown and knows all about the conflict.  Cattrall's green eyes end up attracting the interest of the Chinese prince/crime lord who decides to kidnap her as well, thinking that he can offer her up as tribute to the god who placed the ancient curse on him, then the green-eyed Chinese woman will live out her life as his unwilling wife.

Anyway, this movie was ridiculous and absurd in all the best ways-- lots of extended gymnastics tumbling scenes, overly long airborne sword fights, people jumping much higher than they should be able to, a monster with an eyeball on the end of his tongue, Russell getting his boot knife stuck in a guy's body, blinding lasers coming out of people's mouths, lightning strikes emanating from people's bodies... this movie has everything.

I loved this movie. It was bonkers in all the right ways.

I also want to own Kurt Russell's amazing tank top that he wears in this film. 

I remember hat movie all said Kurt Russell was doing a *John Wayne impersonation   Ever see *Tarentino's 2007 Grindhouse? You'd never now it but ol Kurt portrayed one of the sickest guys ever who liked killing young girls with his car-(a fmr stuntman his car was supped up BIG-TIME!) It has 2 sections Grindhouse the 1st half was Robet Rodriguez as director & about zombies, *Quentin did the 2nd and a long film as well, only raking in $25m. still that 2nd half is so powerful & has car chase scenes like you've never seen before or since  But he was truly an all out villian

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