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YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN (1974)

I watched this movie yesterday as part of my Halloween viewing this year. 

I love this movie and have seen it a few times, but I still find new things to like. For example, in the recent viewing, it just registered with me that Igor takes only the small bag when he picks up Frederick Frankenstein from the train station.

Anyway, YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN is my favorite Mel Brooks movie (well, it's tied with HIGH ANXIETY). With a screenplay by Brooks and Gene Wilder (who also plays the title role), it tells the story of  the infamous Dr. Frankenstein's grandson, who journeys to his ancestral home in Transylvania (somehow traveling there by train from America) and ultimately resumes the work of the elder Frankenstein, work that the younger Frankenstein previously denounced as "do do."

The movie boasts a supporting cast of some of the greatest comedic actors ever appearing together in one film: Marty Feldman (as Igor - pronounced Eye-gor), Teri Garr, Kenneth Mars, Madeline Kahn, Peter Boyle and the great Cloris Leachman as Frau Blücher (cue horses whinnying).

This movie never disappoints and includes some of the most memorable lines of any movie I've seen. Favorites are:

"Put the candle back." 

"Ovaltine?"

"What is it exactly that you do do?"   

"Sedagive?!" 

"He vas my boyfriend!" 

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36 minutes ago, HoldenIsHere said:

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN (1974)

 

Aside from Young Frankenstein being an hysterically funny film one of the additional wonderful aspects that a viewing of the film provides is the love and affection that Mel Brooks had for the Universal horror films. Magnificent talents like Gene Wilder and Madeline Kahn were both, arguably, at the zenith of their comedic brilliance when performing under the inspired lunacy of Brooks' command as director. The idea of the parody was Wilder's original idea, of course, the final screenplay a collaboration of both Gene and Mel (with a little bit of help from Mary Shelley).

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1 hour ago, HoldenIsHere said:

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN (1974)

I love this movie and have seen it a few times, but I still find new things to like. For example, in the recent viewing, it just registered with me that Igor takes only the small bag when he picks up Frederick Frankenstein from the train station.

There's a deleted gag where Igor shows up at the big "Puttin' on the Ritz" assembly also in a snappy tux, without his hump--"Not with THIS tux!" he replies, when Frederick asks the obvious question.

You can still see fancy hump-less Igor briefly in the final film, as he tries to calm the Monster down when he breaks up the show.

29 minutes ago, TomJH said:

The idea of the parody was Wilder's original idea, of course, the final screenplay a collaboration of both Gene and Mel (with a little bit of help from Mary Shelley)

Gene Wilder as a writer has a good sense for old-fashioned slapstick, but also for an odd, self-aware "quirky" style that doesn't quite deliver.  (There was a lot more of the "Sexually-frustrated Frederick" plot that ended up on the cutting-room floor.)

He's also no director without Mel's timing--The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Brother (1975) is tolerable, but The World's Greatest Lover (1977) is pure physical torture to sit through.  :huh:

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

Gene Wilder as a writer has a good sense for old-fashioned slapstick, but also for an odd, self-aware "quirky" style that doesn't quite deliver.

You don't think he delivered? Oh, excuse me, "quite' delivered. I thought he delivered in spades. Maybe you weren't there when the package came.

;  -  )

/////

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38 minutes ago, laffite said:

You don't think he delivered? Oh, excuse me, "quite' delivered. I thought he delivered in spades. Maybe you weren't there when the package came.

Oops, sorry, typo--"Doesn't always quite deliver", meant to say.

(And again, look at the deleted scenes, and you'll see some of the package returns.)

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I just saw a str\iong true story from 1983 a tv movie starring then 66yr old Robert Mitchum-(the same year he did the hugely popular & media crazy mini-series THE WINDS OF WAR (**1/2) Personally I think it's sequel 5yrs later in '89 WAR AND REMEMBERANCE was much better (***1/2) with stunning holocaust sequences

A Killer in the Family (***) also with a very young James Spader, Eric Stoltz & Stuart Margolin  This guy he plays makes Mr. Powell in Night of the Hunter and Max Cady in Cape Fear seem like choir boys

You can easily find it online & I think it was youtube

But this tv movie slipped through the cracks in his long caeer

 

(P.S. I love the story he tells when he was about age 15-16 & always getting into trouble  His mother asked him what e wanted to do with his life & he simply said "I Think I want To Be A Bum" unquote & was for a few yrs riding the rails,etc  His brother-(looks just like him) did just that himself)

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9 hours ago, TomJH said:

Aside from Young Frankenstein being an hysterically funny film one of the additional wonderful aspects that a viewing of the film provides is the love and affection that Mel Brooks had for the Universal horror films. Magnificent talents like Gene Wilder and Madeline Kahn were both, arguably, at the zenith of their comedic brilliance when performing under the inspired lunacy of Brooks' command as director. The idea of the parody was Wilder's original idea, of course, the final screenplay a collaboration of both Gene and Mel (with a little bit of help from Mary Shelley).

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Barely over B. Saddles my vote as *Mel's best  My reason B & W

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9 hours ago, TomJH said:

Aside from Young Frankenstein being an hysterically funny film one of the additional wonderful aspects that a viewing of the film provides is the love and affection that Mel Brooks had for the Universal horror films. Magnificent talents like Gene Wilder and Madeline Kahn were both, arguably, at the zenith of their comedic brilliance when performing under the inspired lunacy of Brooks' command as director. The idea of the parody was Wilder's original idea, of course, the final screenplay a collaboration of both Gene and Mel (with a little bit of help from Mary Shelley).

giphy.gif

FriendlyFearlessKarakul-size_restricted.

source.gif

ShockingMessyDogwoodtwigborer-size_restr

tumblr_puplohdl7O1tdkro1o5_500.gifv

 

TomJH, terrific clips

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On 10/5/2019 at 3:21 PM, laffite said:

You may not get a reply once in awhile but you sure have become enBOLEDen of late.

thank you  if you were citing to me though?  still make some writing errs, but still must use mostly 1 arm, due to the left one being dislocated

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50 minutes ago, spence said:

thank you  if you were citing to me though?  still make some writing errs, but still must use mostly 1 arm, due to the left one being dislocated

And does said injury also cause you to have endless conversations with yourself, and beg for responses on a rotation of three different topics all month?

(Yeah, one time I sprained my ankle, and couldn't stop talking about Oscar predictions for three weeks...)

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50 minutes ago, spence said:

thank you  if you were citing to me though?  still make some writing errs, but still must use mostly 1 arm, due to the left one being dislocated

I was chiding you for posting in BOLD that you have done so much of late.

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Bad Lieutenant (1992) been 20+ years since I've seen it.  That is one mess up cop.  Loved the scene when he shot the car radio. :lol:

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Absence of Malice (1981) Sally Field is an ethically-challenged reporter.  With the help of an even more unscrupulous federal investigator, played by Bob Balaban, she writes a story that implicates Michael Gallagher (Paul Newman) in the disappearance & presumed murder of a union boss.  Gallagher is on the radar because his uncle is a mobster. The film employs a procedural narrative that delivers little dramatic tension. The severest act happens off screen. The characters feel slightly underwritten. The exception is Melinda Dillon’s poignant portrayal of Teresa Perrone, Gallagher’s best friend, who occupies the moral epicenter. While everyone else is playing a game of extreme cynicism, not uncommon in journalism and politics, Teresa feels most acutely. I liked the straight-forward approach and lack of style. Of course, Director Sydney Pollack was never known as a stylist. I’m not saying this in the pejorative. I enjoy Pollack’s work. Wilford Brimley makes a needed, late appearance to munch down on some scenery.

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1 hour ago, hamradio said:

Bad Lieutenant (1992) been 20+ years since I've seen it.  That is one mess up cop.  Loved the scene when he shot the car radio. :lol:

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Saw that on tv a year after it's theatrical release & one sick guy Keitel played, huh  But both Ebert & Siskel felt he shoulda been nommed for it   Overall for me (**-out of 4) some despise it, not me though  There's a follow up but better & funny with *Nicolas Cage, look for it

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9 minutes ago, cinemaspeak59 said:

Absence of Malice (1981) Sally Field is an ethically-challenged reporter.  With the help of an even more unscrupulous federal investigator, played by Bob Balaban, she writes a story that implicates Michael Gallagher (Paul Newman) in the disappearance & presumed murder of a union boss.  Gallagher is on the radar because his uncle is a mobster. The film employs a procedural narrative that delivers little dramatic tension. The severest act happens off screen. The characters feel slightly underwritten. The exception is Melinda Dillon’s poignant portrayal of Teresa Perrone, Gallagher’s best friend, who occupies the moral epicenter. While everyone else is playing a game of extreme cynicism, not uncommon in journalism and politics, Teresa feels most acutely. I liked the straight-forward approach and lack of style. Of course, Director Sydney Pollack was never known as a stylist. I’m not saying this in the pejorative. I enjoy Pollack’s work. Wilford Brimley makes a needed, late appearance to munch down on some scenery.

Wrote about this a ew days back, god one huh Went to it in north NJ when it was released  But, *Paul followed this up with a superb one THWE VERDICT!   & being green Oscar-Wise I actually predicted he'd win Best Actor Oscar over *Ben Kingsey in Gandhi?  That's ok, my debut year handicapping & didn't know the politics of the AMPAS I also thought E.T. would defeat *Gandhi?  Don't get me wrong the latter is a very strong bio (***1/2) but falls exactly into that epic coffee table BP type

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14 minutes ago, cinemaspeak59 said:

Absence of Malice (1981) Sally Field is an ethically-challenged reporter.  With the help of an even more unscrupulous federal investigator, played by Bob Balaban, she writes a story that implicates Michael Gallagher (Paul Newman) in the disappearance & presumed murder of a union boss.  Gallagher is on the radar because his uncle is a mobster. The film employs a procedural narrative that delivers little dramatic tension. The severest act happens off screen. The characters feel slightly underwritten. The exception is Melinda Dillon’s poignant portrayal of Teresa Perrone, Gallagher’s best friend, who occupies the moral epicenter. While everyone else is playing a game of extreme cynicism, not uncommon in journalism and politics, Teresa feels most acutely. I liked the straight-forward approach and lack of style. Of course, Director Sydney Pollack was never known as a stylist. I’m not saying this in the pejorative. I enjoy Pollack’s work. Wilford Brimley makes a needed, late appearance to munch down on some scenery.

did you see Absence on cable on demand?

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On 10/6/2019 at 1:12 PM, midwestan said:

I watched the TCM premiere of "Summertree" Saturday night.  This 1971 anti-war movie starred Michael Douglas, Brenda Vaccaro, Jack Warden, Barbara Bel Geddes, and Kirk Callaway.  Douglas plays a college student who's trying to figure out what to do with his life, as most 19-21 year old kids are wont to do.  As long as he stays in college, he can get a deferment from the draft to Vietnam.  Following his Christmas break, he decides to apply to a music conservancy after he gets good initial reviews from his audition (guitar playing).  A man waiting off-stage offers him a job to play in between band sets at a coffee house he owns, and Douglas jumps at the chance.  Things are going swell.  He has a job offer, a chance to study and make music, a love life that is sweet and hot with Brenda Vaccaro (a nurse who's separated, but not yet divorced from her husband), good rapport with his 'little brother', played by Kirk Callaway, and a somewhat tepid, but improving relationship with his parents (Warden and Bel Geddes).

Then he makes the fateful decision to drop out of college to pursue his music education.  Since the conservancy is tied to the university he's attending, things should be fine as far as his draft status is concerned.  Things in his life begin to unravel as the first big 'Whoops' occurs.  He doesn't get a scholarship to the conservancy.  His father shows up to give him his draft notice.  His girlfriend's husband shows up from 'Nam.  His 'little brother's' real life brother is killed in 'Nam.  Talk about when it rains, it pours!!  So Jerry (Douglas' character) tries to figure out how to get out of the draft.  He settles on his last, best idea, which is to high-tail it off to Canada.  He buys a beat up Ford Falcon and stops at his home to bid his parents adieu.  His mom doesn't like the idea of him leaving, but she's supportive of his decision.  Dad is against the idea.  Is it because he's concerned about his son being labeled a fugitive or a coward?  We aren't sure, but he gives in and takes his son to an auto repair shop to check out the car and get a new set of tires for the trip north.  While at the garage, Douglas overhears Warden speaking with the owner of the body shop imploring him to do something, anything to disable the vehicle for a few days (presumably to try and reason with his son).   Douglas freaks out, jumps in the car, burns rubber, and tries to speed off, but instead T-bones a car being hauled by a tow truck to the body shop.  Warden gets in on the passenger side of the car and has a staredown with his boy.

I'm not going to give away the ending here, but it does have a stunning twist to it.  Well, stunning as far as I was concerned.  Prior to Saturday night, I had only seen "Summertree" once, and that was back in 1973 or 74 when it was on the CBS Late Movie, which came on after the local news at 10:30.  Back then, NBC had the Tonight Show and ABC had The Joey Bishop Show (I think), while CBS showed movies that lasted anywhere from 90 minutes to two hours in length.  As for "Summertree", I'd give it about 6.5 out of 10.

My husband and I watched this one on Saturday, too.  While it held our interest, we noted how "flabby" the direction was, rather episodic and typical of films of that era.  We both grew up in that era, so we noted the styles, awful decor (Brenda Vacarro's apartment with the paneling and orange couch).  However, I also recalled my dad, who was a high school teacher then, speaking against the war and saying that if my brother came of age before it ended, he would have glady sent him to Canada (we're also only one generation removed Canadian anyway).  When my dad died, we actually found letters he wrote for a student who was applying to be a conscientious objector.  So, this film brought back many memories for me.

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The Big Gusher (1951)

Breezy little "B" from Columbia, with Wayne Morris and Preston Foster as a pair of buddy oil men in search a fortune in black gold. Morris likes the ladies while Foster has a problem holding onto any money he has after a few drinks. Foster, while drunk, will lose most of their grubstake in a purchase of "oil" land, only to have an old timer (Paul E. Burns) with a divining rod (and he's always been lucky with that divining stick) tell the boys that there really is oil on their land. This was the second of two productions in which the studio co-starred Morris and Foster, the other being The Tougher They Come, another outdoorsy drama, in which they played a pair of lumber men.

Dorothy Patrick plays an ambitious waitress who loans a drunken Foster money he can't repay, thereby buying herself a third share of the oil land lease. The boys are battling against time to bring in the oil, 60 days, in fact, or else they have to give up their claim to crooked Emmett Vogan, who has loaned them their oil drilling equipment. What Morris and Foster don't know is that the girl is in on a scheme with Vogan to delay their progress. Patrick will, of course, also become a source of rivalry (pretty light hearted admittedly) between the two oil buddies, as well.

This is the kind of predictable fare that offers little in the way of surprises, though it's smoothly done, even if on an obviously limited budget. Even though they had to know they were working with second tier material in a film that would undoubtedly wind up the second feature of a double bill, neither Wayne Morris nor Preston Foster act like they're slumming it.

You can feel for both actors, a pair of middle aged performers, neither in top demand in the early '50s by a changing, hard industry, going through their paces with cliche material and delivering professional, committed performances. I doubt that this film did anything for either of their careers (even if the film is amiable enough for the viewer).

So how many of you have heard of The Big Gusher? Yeh, I thought so. I hadn't heard of it before either. But at least Sony released the film with a nice looking print as a made-on-demand DVD. On the other hand, best of luck in finding a decent looking copy of the other film on which the two actors collaborated, The Tougher They Come.

MV5BZTBjZWE1NmMtNmZhMS00NjFlLTliYTctYzMx

2 out of 4

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Against the Wind 1948 British movie by Charles Crichton with Simone Signoret,James Robertson Justice Robert Beatty.I do not know if it was ever showed on TCM.Good spy story set in wartime Belgium.Good Cast. 7/10

AGAINST.jpg

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I just watched "Devil In A Blue Dress" via TCM On Demand.  I remember when Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert previewed this on their PBS show after it first came out.  I'd never seen it before today, and I thought it was very good...awfully violent, with some graphic scenes, but otherwise it was well-acted.  Very good use of vintage vehicles as the movie was set in post-war L.A., circa 1948.

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I finally saw ROCKETMAN '19 yesterday, the biography of Elton John. I didn't have high hopes for it, mostly because I have been following Elton John's career before he ever came to America in 1970. I recall someone here commenting about horribly his Mother was portrayed and was shocked because Reg was a true "mamma's boy". He often included her in his early interviews and I'm very familiar with her appearance, her career, etc. I watched this with MrTiki who only knows Elton's hit songs and the very basics of his life.

ROCKETMAN was one big hot mess for both viewers. The story seems to be flashbacks on his life, as revealed by a crazy costumed Elton in group therapy rehab session. I do like the progression of his "undressing" in each flash forward, as he gets deeper into his personal story until almost "naked" by the end.

Early in Elton's childhood, when everyone realizes he's a musical prodigy, the little boy Elton bursts into song & dance along with every bystander in the neighborhood singing "Booch is Back". Huh? Why a 1975 song in a 1950 setting? Although I like traditional musicals, it was a confusing failure. 

One of the most exciting aspects of Elton's career was it's inception and making a huge hit coming to America. I find this period of his life formative and I asked MrTiki if he got ANY SENSE at all, about Elton's feelings-was he scared was he shy was he excited & pumped up? Nope, all the casual viewer got from that sequence was Elton's sexual orientation. Big deal.

I am glad the most important Dick James Office scene with the record rep casually tossing an envelope of Bernie Taupin's lyrics from a stack to Elton was done very well. 

Most of this film chronicles events & costumes, not enough of the creative process involved in making music. There are a few scenes of Elton composing & Bernie listening to his lyrics set to music for the first time. That's MAGIC, why not show more of that? 

Elton's early British recordings are sweet & immature, and it was disappointing their musical arc wasn't part of this story. The band, which is so important for emotional as well as musical support was never mentioned! Just all of a sudden he's in a recording booth with Kiki Dee.

And every song was set in the wrong time. MrT suggested the songs were chosen because the lyrics "fit" the situation. Huh? Those are someone else's lyrics. If that's the case though, just like other movies that have attempted (Forest Gump, Across The Universe) songs may evoke a remembrance from your life, but it's a lousy way to tell a story.

I will say however, I thought the guy who played Elton was fabulous. And I loved that he did his own singing, it brought sincerity to the character. Elton surely chose him for his fabulous physique! This movie was Elton's project, so this is his personal "view". But both this fan & non fan hated it.

elton-johns-biopic-rocketman-to-premiere

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I enjoyed The Red Badge of Courage and can only wish that someday somewhere a full version of the film, with the 25 minutes MGM cut, can be found, restored, and shown. Nicely directed by John Huston and well acted. Audie Murphy is quite effective, and Arthur Hunnicutt in particular is a real plus.

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10 minutes ago, kingrat said:

I enjoyed The Red Badge of Courage and can only wish that someday somewhere a full version of the film, with the 25 minutes MGM cut, can be found, restored, and shown. Nicely directed by John Huston and well acted. Audie Murphy is quite effective, and Arthur Hunnicutt in particular is a real plus.

Actually king, I think MGM tossed 66 minutes of film by the wayside.  According to Ben Mankiewicz's opening to the movie, it was originally two hours and 15 minutes long (or 135 minutes).  I don't know how well it would have stood up.  Ben said test audiences were not crazy about the picture when it was first previewed, and MGM, under orders from Louis B. Mayer, pared the picture down to its final 69 minutes which we see today.  All in all, not bad editing.  I had no idea the original film was as long as it was, and I've seen this picture several times.  It seems as though John Huston got the 'Orson Welles' treatment from the studio when he was overseas doing some pre-shoots for "The African Queen".  That's when all the cuts were made.  James Whitmore's narration was very good in this too.  As for Stephen Crane, author of "The Red Badge of Courage", the guy was wise beyond his years.  He's one of my favorite authors, and it still bums me out that he died at such a young age.  😧

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