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"Black Fury" (1935)  never heard of this coal miners movie before, LOVED IT!  Had a happy ending.

Nice to see drama about a coal miners worries & woes that didn't revolved around global warming. :D

original-film-title-black-fury-english-t

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I'm sorry, just a little something else about GOTHIC (1986) that I meant to mention in my review- it is, in many ways- a SUPER LITERATE, MERCHANT IVORY-ESQUE version of any number of teenage slasher films- based around the premise (that existed in the days before internet) of a group of friends going for a weekend in the country, becoming isolated and terrorized- ALBEIT, in the case of GOTHIC, internally and by their own fears.

Somewhere out there, in the MULTIVERSE of story ideas, there is a really great hybrid of GOTHIC and FRIDAY THE THIRTEENTH PART  3-D- where George Gordon, Lord Byron; SHELLEY (the curly haired dork from part 3, not Percy Byssche), their friends DANNY and TEENA (because there is ALWAYS a Teena) and MARY SHELLEY- the spooky Virgin who lives at the end- face off against a hockey-mask donning, scythe-weilding JANE AUSTEN, out FOR REVENGE.

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Walk A Crooked Mile (1948)

Enemy agent crime drama, done in the semi-documentary style so popular in Hollywood in the late '40s. FBI agent Dennis O'Keefe and Scotland Yard man Louis Hayward (crime fighting hands extended across the waters) combine forces to get the low down on secret agents smuggling scientific formulas out of a California nuclear facility.

Reed Hadley's stentorious delivery provides the voice over narration throughout, so there is a real familiarity here for fans of the genre. The film is well paced and reasonably exciting (there will be a tommy gun blasting, shoot 'em up climax seemingly right out of Warners' G Men). There are also some slightly cartoony characterizations, too, particularly of the villains.

You know that the enemy agents in the film are Commie rat bastards because when they get together they are all addressing each other as "Comrade" and it takes only seconds before one of them makes a reference to "world revolution." (Boo, hiss, Red pigs, get back to Moscow where ya belong!). Among the agents are Onslow Stevens, ruthless head of the organization, and a bearded Raymond Burr, who later turns out to be pretty vicious himself.

Of course this film was produced by Columbia as the Red scare in Hollywood was reaching a peak in paranoia. O'Keefe, who had scored well recently in a pair of Anthony Mann noirs, T-Men and Raw Deal, is solid as the FBI agent, while Hayward is serious and efficient as the Scotland Yard man.

There will be one scene in which the film's two heroes are taken captive by the Commies, and it looks like curtains for our boys. All joking aside, though, it's an exciting, well staged sequence, even if it does have a corny finale with the death of a landlady, an "old country" immigrant who has dealt with thugs before (the screenplay equating Commies to Nazis here) and is glad to give her life for her new country. In fact, the lady even gives us a mini speech as she is croaking on the floor just to let us know just how proud a patriot she is. (Time out to quietly wave the flag, folks).

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2.5 out of 4

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I also watched WAXWORK (1988) on AMAZON PRIME.

Waxwork+(1988,+USA,+Jim+Warren+Art).jpg

I saw this movie as a kid and liked it very, very much...re-watching it as an adult always disappoints- it desperately needed a rewrite to gap some holes in the plot and there are definite shortcomings with the budget and the logic and the narrative...

and yet....

The scenes that work- The Werewolf, Dracula (played surprisingly well by MILES O'KEEFE), and (most especially!) The Mummy (which uses Swan Lake!)- work really, really well, but the rest is a very, very, very mixed bag.

Did DAVID WARNER **** someone off LEE TRACY style? He is a good actor, but DAMNED if he doesn't say "yes" to ANY and EVERYTthing he is offered.

ZACH GALLIGAN was SO ADORABLE. I think there is a dark story there, not long after this, he lost his looks and was arrested for shoplifting ca. 2004 on The Sunset Strip.

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7 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I also watched WAXWORK (1988) on AMAZON PRIME.

I saw this movie as a kid and liked it very, very much...re-watching it as an adult always disappoints- it desperately needed a rewrite to gap some holes in the plot and there are definite shortcomings with the budget and the logic and the narrative...

and yet....

The scenes that work- The Werewolf, Dracula (played surprisingly well by MILES O'KEEFE), and (most especially!) The Mummy (which uses Swan Lake!)- work really, really well, but the rest is a very, very, very mixed bag.

Did DAVID WARNER **** someone off LEE TRACY style? He is a good actor, but DAMNED if he doesn't say "yes" to ANY and EVERYTthing he is offered.

ZACH GALLIGAN was SO ADORABLE. I think there is a dark story there, not long after this, he lost his looks and was arrested for shoplifting ca. 2004 on The Sunset Strip.

I have that on disc with the sequel. I was thinking about watching part 2 again soon, as I don't recall much from it, other than take-offs on The Haunting and Night of the Living Dead.

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1 minute ago, LawrenceA said:

I have that on disc with the sequel. I was thinking about watching part 2 again soon, as I don't recall much from it, other than take-offs on The Haunting and Night of the Living Dead.

I remember thinking WAXWORK 2: BACK IN TIME was funny (there is more comedy) when I saw it a reeeeeeeeeeeeeeaaaaaaally long time ago. (I think the year it came out)...but don't recall much else.

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if you will forgive me for taking an aside here, the biggest thing that bugs me about WAXWORK is that we are told that there are 16 exhibits representing "the sixteen most evil men of all time" who are brought back to life thru sacrifices (fine), but one of the exhibits is of THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA who, I mean, wasn't nice or anything, but "one of the most evil men of all time"? Like, seriously, you're telling me The Phantom of the Frickin Opera was worse than Hitler or Mussolini or Stalin? And also the SPACE ALIEN, how exactly does he fit in to the "most evil" was he the most evil on his own planet? ...and also, I suppose, the collective zombies in the NIGHT OF THE LIVIng DEAD EXHIBIT represent (collectively) ONE of the EVIL GUYs... or do they assemble to form ZOMBIE VOLTRON or what? and then the MARQUIS DE SADE doesn't really rate high on the "EVIL" scale for me....

i know i'm overthinking it, but it still bugs me

edit- it could use a second draft is all i'm saying

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2 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

if you will forgive me for taking an aside here, the biggest thing that bugs me about WAXWORK is we are told that there are 16 exhibits representing "the sixteen most evil men of all time" who are brought back to life thru sacrifices (fine), but one of the exhibits is of THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA who, I mean, wasn't nice or anything, but "one of the most evil men of all time"? Like, seriously, you're telling me The guy who had an issue with Carlotta performing FAUST and took it out the wrong way one night was worse than Hitler or Stalin? And also the SPACE ALIEN, how exactly does he fit in to the "most evil" was he the most evil on his own planet? And the COBRA MAN? I mean, worse than Ba'Al and the Hindu gods of destruction?...and also, I suppose, the collective zombies in the NIGHT OF THE LIVIng DEAD EXHIBIT represent (collectively) ONE of the EVIL GUYs... or do they assemble to form ZOMBIE VOLTRON or what?

i know i'm overthinking it, but it still bugs me

edit- it could use a second draft is all i'm saying

No, you're absolutely right. Waxwork is pretty dumb if you try to break it down and really examine it. I learned to just enjoy the bits I like and try to ignore the rest. And it's not like I, or anyone else that I'm aware of, think it's one of the best movies of its type, even as far as cheap 80's horror goes.

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Manhattan Melodrama (1934)

I missed bits and pieces of it, and a chunk around the last 30 minute mark for a drink, but it was a good movie. Clark Gable and William Powell were great in it on opposite sides and I just love when they reference Sing Sing, so classically oldschool! The underlying connection, the incorruptible with the corrupted, the deft black hand, and the last movie watched by Dillinger so you know it's something real swell.

8/10

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4 minutes ago, Ampersand said:

Manhattan Melodrama (1934)

I missed bits and pieces of it, and a chunk around the last 30 minute mark for a drink, but it was a good movie. Clark Gable and William Powell were great in it on opposite sides and I just love when they reference Sing Sing, so classically oldschool! The underlying connection, the incorruptible with the corrupted, the deft black hand, and the last movie watched by Dillinger so you know it's something real swell.

8/10

Yes,   Manhattan Melodrama is a solid film and one I have always enjoyed.    Like many (I assume),  I found this film after seeing some Thin Man films,  falling for the Powell \ Loy team.   Of course this film is a drama but in some ways that makes it a special Powell \ Loy film.     Gable was also very good as a charming not-so-good-guy.

A must-see for fans of these three. 

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4 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Yes,   Manhattan Melodrama is a solid film and one I have always enjoyed.    Like many (I assume),  I found this film after seeing some Thin Man films,  falling for the Powell \ Loy team.   Of course this film is a drama but in some ways that makes it a special Powell \ Loy film.     Gable was also very good as a charming not-so-good-guy.

A must-see for fans of these three. 

Completely agree, although I have just a LITTLE bit of trouble believing that Mickey Rooney grows up to be Clark Gable.

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

Completely agree, although I have just a LITTLE bit of trouble believing that Mickey Rooney grows up to be Clark Gable.

That was my small issue with the movie too. I guess though in 1934, who knew what Mickey Rooney would grow up to look like. 
 

I guess that’s great for Mickey to grow up to look like Clark, but bad for Clark that he used to look like Mickey. 

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52 Pickup (1986)

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This is a  John Frankenheimer film, and that should have meant something.

Frankenhieimer gave us some great Transitional Noirs, In the early 60s he was on fire. Those Transitional Noirs were All Fall DownThe Manchurian Candidate, and Seconds. He also directed Seven Days in MayBirdman of AlcatrazThe Train, and Grand Prix which I believe was his first color film.

Then he just sort of disappeared below my horizon, I don't remember much of note, maybe he didn't like working in color, who knows?  He kept making films. Films that made some blips on the radar screen. I haven't seen all of them but those I did somewhat like were RoninReindeer Games and this one 52 Pickup.

It was written by Elmore Leonard and based on his novel. Cinematography was by Jost Vacano and Stephen Ramsey (uncredited). Music was by Gary Chang.

The film stars Roy Scheider as Harry Mitchell, Ann-Margret as Barbara Mitchell, Vanity as Doreen, John Glover as Alan Raimy, Clarence Williams III as Bobby Shy, Lonny Chapman as Jim O'Boyle, Kelly Preston as Cini, Robert Trebor as Leo Franks, Doug McClure as Mark Arveson, and real porn stars Ron Jeremy and Amber Lynn as Party Goers.

52 Pickup suffers from a real lack of any character development so you don't really care enough for any of the cast to get emotionally sucked into the story. The film proceeds in a pedestrian by the book manner without a lot of heart or very much of a memorable style and it feels like it's from another era.  Ann-Margaret is underused. I was hoping to see her in at least one good Noir/Neo Noir. It also suffers from the lack of a very strong villain. It diffuses the villainy among three characters. It needed an over the top protagonist.

Remember at the same time 52 Pickup came out we already had films by those that would be the new torch bearers setting new benchmarks, the Coen Brothers and David Lynch were making their marks and pushing the envelope. The Coen's Blood Simple (1984), Wim Wenders Paris, Texas (1984), Eastwood's Tightrope (1984),  William Friedkin's To Live and Die in L.A. (1985), Lynch's Blue Velvet (1986), and Alan Parker's Angel Heart (1987). Quentin Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs was just five years down the road. Full review with screen caps in Fiim Noir/Gangster pages. Watchable 6-7/10

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20 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Somewhere out there, in the MULTIVERSE of story ideas, there is a really great hybrid

You're weird.

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Image result for the king of comedy joker king images

The King Of Comedy (1983) 10/10 DVD

It is about Rupert Pupkin, a nerd (Robert DeNiro) who fancies himself a great comedian and wants to be famous like his idol talk show host Jerry Langford (Jerry Lewis). This film is getting a lot more attention these days due to the similarity to the new Joker, which I have also just seen.

I had seen this when it was first released and liked it, but I have seen it numerous more times and it has grown to be one of my favorite movies of all time. It has become more timely than ever today, with all the no talent "stars" of reality shows and Youtube who have achieved some fame. 

DeNiro gives one of his best performances in an atypical role, he had just played tough guy boxer Jake LaMotta in Raging Bull and makes a total 180 as the delusional, pathetic loser Pupkin. Jerry Lewis is great as Langford, a man who has become weary from the fame. He said in interviews that he just played himself, and if you saw him on his telethon or talk shows where his over serious and sometimes arrogant side comes out, you see what he means. 

There are some funny, cringing moments in it, making this a very unusual movie experience. Martin Scorsese's direction is excellent, blending fantasy and reality. 

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I too love "The King of Comedy."

From the NY Times review, this is one of my favorite sequences and lines:

Mr. Zimmerman's screenplay is ungraciously hilarious when it focuses its attention on pure show biz, as when, in one of Rupert's fantasies, he attempts, with the gravity of a Barbara Walters, to explain the sources of his comic routines. I also cherish its throwaway lines: Rupert, lying in wait for Jerry Langford in a fancy network waiting room, keeps staring at the ceiling. ''Is it cork?'' he asks, being suave. Says the bored receptionist: ''I don't know. Is it dripping on you?''

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18 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I also watched WAXWORK (1988) on AMAZON PRIME.

Waxwork+(1988,+USA,+Jim+Warren+Art).jpg

 

 

 

Could reuse that image for any "Plastic Surgery Gone Bad" documentary.

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ROSEMARY'S BABY (1968) *Score: 3.5/5*

This is part of my October Scavenger Hunt for my film club. I definitely enjoyed this. It's not my favorite, but I thought the pacing was quite good, and they definitely followed Ira Levin's novel fairly closely. Sure, everyone was good, but I really enjoyed Ruth Gordon as Mrs. Castavet. Holy cow, she stole the show. I wish Patsy Kelly had had more screen time, because I think she's funny too. 

Related image

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PLAY IT AGAIN, SAM (1972) *Score: 2/5*

This was originally a play written by Allen, and he starred in it and wrote the screenplay for the film adaptation. 

This was alright. I thought it was clever to have Bogie appear every so often to "speak" to Allen's character. I always enjoy Diane Keaton (she was a baby faced 26 here); she's also a huge fashion icon, so there's that. 

Image result for play it again sam 1972

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11 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

That was my small issue with the movie too. I guess though in 1934, who knew what Mickey Rooney would grow up to look like. 
 

I guess that’s great for Mickey to grow up to look like Clark, but bad for Clark that he used to look like Mickey. 

Well Mickey does end up doing a fine impression of Gable in an Andy Hardy film.

Mickey also ends up with wives that may have been fooled to believe he looked like Gable!

image.jpeg.e5fd36f4869cb2f827f9ff971b515e59.jpegimage.jpeg.b76d6af5bcfb6a8e59b6594bbb814f0f.jpeg

 

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2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

DeNiro gives one of his best performances in an atypical role

It IS atypical and yet it's amazing how he seems to fit so comfortably in the role. Absolutely convincing. 

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29 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

I wish Patsy Kelly had had more screen time, because I think she's funny too. 

Image result for patsy kelly rosemary's baby images

She had one of her funniest moments here, near the end.

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34 minutes ago, NickAndNora34 said:

ROSEMARY'S BABY (1968) *Score: 3.5/5*

This is part of my October Scavenger Hunt for my film club. I definitely enjoyed this. It's not my favorite, but I thought the pacing was quite good, and they definitely followed Ira Levin's novel fairly closely. Sure, everyone was good, but I really enjoyed Ruth Gordon as Mrs. Castavet. Holy cow, she stole the show. I wish Patsy Kelly had had more screen time, because I think she's funny too. 

I'm not a big fan of horror movies. I've seen Rosemary's Baby exactly once.

My favorite part was when the one woman delivered her "Hail Satan!" line with a little too much enthusiasm.

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4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

52 Pickup (1986)

poster.jpg


This is a  John Frankenheimer film, and that should have meant something.

Frankenhieimer gave us some great Transitional Noirs, In the early 60s he was on fire. Those Transitional Noirs were All Fall DownThe Manchurian Candidate, and Seconds. He also directed Seven Days in MayBirdman of AlcatrazThe Train, and Grand Prix which I believe was his first color film.

Then he just sort of disappeared below my horizon, I don't remember much of note, maybe he didn't like working in color, who knows?  He kept making films. Films that made some blips on the radar screen. I haven't seen all of them but those I did somewhat like were RoninReindeer Games and this one 52 Pickup.

 

Joe, I believe that Frankenheimer, like so many of his contemporaries, had drug problems which affected his career. Later on, he also did a number of mini-series for TV, and some of this work has been praised by those who have seen it. I haven't. Like you, I am a big fan of Frankenheimer's work in the 60s. I consider him the best American director of the 1960s--the consensus choice would probably be Kubrick, which is understandable, but Frankenheimer is certainly in the mix. Also like you, I somewhat liked Ronin and Reindeer Games, but can't help thinking that the younger Frankenheimer could have made them so much better. I haven't seen 52 Pickup.

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1 minute ago, kingrat said:

Joe, I believe that Frankenheimer, like so many of his contemporaries, had drug problems which affected his career.

Could be, I'd have to read a bio and check it out.

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