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speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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4 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I didn't think anything special about Friday the 13th.  All I kept saying was "this person is having sex, they're going to die." "She's the virgin and is wearing white, she'll live." And sure enough, I was right.

The first Friday the 13th was a big hit, but it isn't a good movie. The cliches you're referring to in it weren't quite as prevalent at the time, but they've become so well known and so often parodied now. The Friday series was always the weakest of the Big Four slasher series, with Chainsaw MassacreHalloween, and Elm Street all being better, if of wildly variable quality from movie to movie. The Friday the 13th movies got better when Jason became the central villain, and the stories got more outlandish. They were never what one would generally call good movies, but they became more entertaining. Parts 3, 4 and 6 are the best.

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6 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

The first Friday the 13th was a big hit, but it isn't a good movie. The cliches you're referring to in it weren't quite as prevalent at the time, but they've become so well known and so often parodied now. The Friday series was always the weakest of the Big Four slasher series, with Chainsaw MassacreHalloween, and Elm Street all being better, if of wildly variable quality from movie to movie. The Friday the 13th movies got better when Jason became the central villain, and the stories got more outlandish. They were never what one would generally call good movies, but they became more entertaining. Parts 3, 4 and 6 are the best.

These movies aren't my favorite. I've seen the original Halloween and the original Friday the 13th.  I also saw Freddy Versus Jason. I will say that they're entertaining but nothing I'd ever need to watch more than once.

I always end up having to watch these things if I visit my friends for Halloween--as they like these types of movies.  I, on the other hand, usually watch Charlie Brown, Bell Book and Candle, and Vincent Price.  I think this year I may add the Buffy the Vampire Slayer movie to the mix.

With that said, I saw this sweet Camp Crystal Lake shirt that I really liked.  I didn't buy it though.

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8 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974) 9/10 DVD

The film is short on character development but great in pulse pounding horror. Marilyn Burns plays Sally and she is the greatest screamer I have ever seen on film, she looks great in those skin tight bell bottoms also. The low budget and grainy photography are actual assets to the film,director Tobe Hooper gives us great atmosphere. There is some macabre humor as we see the weird family of killers. We first meet the crazed Hitch-hiker and later his chainsaw wielding brother. The humor comes from the older brother who acts as a cook and keeps the two crazier brothers in line. There is surprisingly little gore in the film, for me the most disturbing scene was an extreme close up of Sally's terrified eyes. 

Every Halloween, in lieu of John Carpenter or Boris Karloff, I look up one great iconic 70's/80's horror classic I was too young to see in the day ("Carrie" two years ago, "Chainsaw" last year, and getting through "Black Christmas" this year)--

And getting through Chainsaw, I discovered what horror experts and film historians love to point out:  Unlike the cheesy name-only goofy reputation-smitten sequels (oh, lord, avoid Hooper's own consciously-goofy Golan/Globus sequel)...NOBODY ever actually gets cut up onscreen with a chainsaw in the original '74 movie.  There's a few nicks of blood, and somebody gets a gash with one in the climax, but the rest is the Element of Implied Imagination that low budgets did so well, which ends up being even creepier.  The last half hour is another story, of course, but the first hour could almost be PG-13.

The original has what I refer to as "Nightmare logic"--Namely, our own nightmares tend to look like low-budget productions:  Sparse, disturbing visuals/audio, a grainy lack of color or music, dialogue that doesn't make sense, and a general internal dread of things that haven't happened yet.  And in the original movie, that dread sense is there...Even before the scary stuff happens, when the crazed Hitchhiker takes the photo and asks for cash, there's that uncomfortable dream delay-buildup of thinking "Okay, just give it to him, or something's going to happen."  And when the characters walk into the empty house, and see no one around but a living room artistically decorated with bones, and a big steel door that something might be behind, we've all had that dream moment of thinking "Okay...Turn around, and walk back out the door NOW, and if I make it just past the property fence in time, no nightmare plot will kick in.  😲 "

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Texas Chainsaw Massacre is a really creepy film imo. The younger brother is my favorite. His performance reminds me a bit of Reinfeld from Browning's Dracula.

"I've got a knife. It's a very good knife!"

"Yeah, I'm sure..." :lol:

The film is on Netflix right now btw but the sound quality leaves a lot to be desired. Even after turning the volume all the way up, I could barely hear it.

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Seven Days in May (1964)

First rate, suspenseful political thriller about a planned coup of the U.S. government by members of the American military. Directed by John Frankenheimer, with a screenplay by Rod Serling, this film remains starkly realistic in its presentation.

John F. Kennedy (who had read the 1962 novel upon which the production was based) was, according to Kirk Douglas, whose production company was involved, encouraging to the film being made, even arranging for the film's opening scenes to be shot outside the White House. Kennedy believed that a military cabal of this nature was possible. The Pentagon, on the other hand, was opposed to the film's production, refusing to allow any scenes to be filmed there. (Frankenheimer did sneak in a shot of Douglas walking up the steps of the Pentagon, anyway).

Kennedy had recently accepted the resignation of the fervent anti-Communist General Edwin Walker, part of the basis for the novel's story. Walker's name is, in fact, mentioned in the Serling screenplay as one of a number of "false prophets," along with Joe McCarthy, to which the American public has turned at times.

The cast is a noteworthy one, with all doing solid work, a few of them outstanding. Douglas persuaded Burt Lancaster to accept the role of James Mattoon Scott, the decorated and highly esteemed military commander who regards an arms treaty about to be signed with the Russians by the American President as a sign of weakness.

Lancaster effectively underplays his role, thereby making the general seem all the more rational. It is a towering portrayal. Very much his equal, though, is Fredric March as the American President. March brings dignity, intelligence and thoughtfulness to his role. There will be a gripping confrontation between March and Lancaster towards the film`s end which Frankenheimer would later regard as probably his favourite directed scene.

Douglas, accepting second billing to Lancaster, is very solid in his less showy role as the "Judas," the general's underling who becomes suspicious of a military coup and reports it to the White House. The first portion of the film, as the suspicions grow, we see through Douglas`s eyes.

sevendaysinmayhd_pub.png

Other performers in the film include Ava Gardner as the former back door girlfriend of the married general, Edmond O'Brien as a dipso Southern senator, and friend of the President, Martin Balsam and George Macready as Presidential assistants initially cynical of the coup suspicion, and, in an unbilled role, John Houseman as an admiral who remains quiet after rejecting participation in the coup. O'Brien would receive the film's sole Oscar acting nomination for a supporting role.

Seven Days in May still works as a chilling political thriller today. With all the turmoil in the current divisive American political climate, while there may not be fears of a military coup occurring, there is still an increasingly surreal feeling that anything could happen. President Kennedy, by the way, never saw the Frankenheimer film, which was released three months after his assassination.

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3 out of 4

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Trivia Question:  Who was the first star shown in the 2000 version of what's become a year-end tradition on TCM, known as TCM Remembers?  Answer at the end of this post.

I watched all the TCM Remembers shows from 2000-2018*.  In less than two months, TCM is expected to show its 20th annual tribute to the men and women who passed away in 2019 and contributed much to the film and entertainment industry that all the posters here enjoy.

Of interest is the fact that of the 17 tributes available on YouTube, all but 2 ended their particular year with an actor or actress.  The exceptions being director Ingmar Bergman in 2007 and of course, TCM's own Robert Osborne in 2017.  14 of the tributes were equally spread out with the endings featuring a man or a woman, but the last three years have all been men (Gene Wilder in 2016, Robert Osborne in 2017, and Burt Reynolds in 2018).  The last person shown in these memorials are either the last vestiges of 'Golden Age' icons or persons that were enthusiastic supporters of TCM and its mission to bring as many classic films to as broad an audience as possible.  For these reasons, I think Doris Day still has the inside track on being the last person shown in this year's tribute.

The tribute piece, which normally runs between TCM shows from mid-December to early January are poignant and very well done.  Sure, there are some gaffes in terms of omissions, and there isn't a lot you can do with hasty edits and additions if someone dies in the last two weeks of the year like Carrie Fisher and Debbie Reynolds did a couple of years ago, or Penny Marshall last year.

*--If you look at all these memorials like I did, you won't find one for 2001 or 2002.  Why this is, I'm not sure.  I seem to recall reading some viewer comments from YouTube about the reason those years aren't available.  One person posted that they contacted TCM about 2001 being absent out of all the tributes.  According to them, the TCM representative explained that the 2001 tribute was something that some behind-the-scenes people at the network weren't very proud of.  Apparently, the editing wasn't as good as it was in 2000, and three well-known Golden Age stars were left out of the memorial, and it wasn't because they died in late December of 2001.  I can't recall who all of the three people were, but I remember one of them was Dorothy McGuire.  As for 2002, the poster stated they never got a reason for its omission from the entire roster of TCM Remembers, except to say for that year (and possibly 2001 as well), the network had trouble getting permission to use the same background music without having to pay exorbitant royalties.

Trivia Question Answer:  Douglas Fairbanks, Jr.

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Continuing my avid journey for Paramount titles, past and present, led me into the path of a remake via HBO today. The remake in question was the 2004 version of the 1966 Michael Caine hit Alfie..... and for once I think the remake is better. (This is something I don't say often) It's still basically the same story: compulsive womanizer gets his comeuppance and becomes much humbled by the end, with him talking directly to the audience the whole way through. But, despite the plot remaining the same, its interesting as a sociological experiment to see changing attitudes on illicit behavior in 1966 as opposed to 2004. The Michael Caine character in 1966 was often quite brutal and snide to the women who crossed his path, and almost without exception (the sole one being Shelley Winters' lively, funny turn) he tossed them aside like garbage and they were mostly deeply pathetic victims who had very little future after being tossed about by him. Well, in 2004, Jude Law plays the character with a bit more vulnerability and definitely a bit more kindness than Caine played it, and even if he still uses the women for rolls in the hay, they are a wiser, deeper group that the ones in 1966. Instead of being mostly cardboard cutouts, they are presented as living, breathing individuals and we see the hopes and dreams, as well as the sadness in their eyes. They still have deep regrets, but these women realize that getting over Alfie won't destroy them. They will muddle through, they have the choices the earlier women did not have, and they know how to survive. 

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6 hours ago, TomJH said:

while there may not be fears of a military coup occurring, there is still an increasingly surreal feeling that anything could happen.

Yeah, you could make the case there's a non-military coup being tried.

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6 hours ago, TomJH said:

Douglas, accepting second billing to Lancaster, is very solid in his less showy role as the "Judas," the general's underling who becomes suspicious of a military coup and reports it to the White House. The first portion of the film, as the suspicions grow, we see through Douglas`s eyes.

Douglas says in his autobiography that he sent the script to Burt Lancaster and told him "I'll play either part, you choose." When Burt decided to play the part of the bad general behind the takeover plot, Douglas said "it was fine with me, because it was the part I usually play, the heavy. I enjoyed playing the role of nice guy."

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23 minutes ago, Fedya said:

Yeah, you could make the case there's a non-military coup being tried.

Hardly. What the House is doing is constitutional, but let's take it to off topics, shall we?

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17 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Douglas says in his autobiography that he sent the script to Burt Lancaster and told him "I'll play either part, you choose." When Burt decided to play the part of the bad general behind the takeover plot, Douglas said "it was fine with me, because it was the part I usually play, the heavy. I enjoyed playing the role of nice guy."

Kirk Douglas is remembered for playing a lot of unscrupulous characters on screen. But his own favourite role (as well as mine of his career) was as the loner cowboy on the run from the law in an increasingly conformist society in Lonely Are The Brave. A great performance, Douglas was possibly never more likeable than in this film.

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The Story of Mankind (1957)

I saw it was on, checked it out and it has Vincent Price, that was all I needed to start watching it. I missed the opening bit and change so for a while I was cheering for Ol' Scratch (Vincent Price) but it's massive, uneven, a grandiose spectacle with a massive named cast. And while I can barely put a name to a face, Groucho Marx as a colonist is so him by his delivery and comedic style that you don't even need the mustache to know it's him; with the other Marx brothers enterprising other roles but none onscreen together. And Queen of England, who devoured every bit of the scenery with every word said. But tuning in, I was wondering when Vincent Price was in a movie about Joan of Arc (Missed Nero and Cleo). It certainly touches on what people would know, and the Spanish/English bit, very nice and a colonist/pilgrim (Whichever one) with a name only the most diehard historians could know. It's certainly not required watching or a classic, nor did it realize all it's ambitions among other things but it was a fun watch.

6/10, a bummer that I missed Peter Lorre.

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2 hours ago, Ampersand said:

Groucho Marx as a colonist is so him by his delivery and comedic style that you don't even need the mustache to know it's him; with the other Marx brothers enterprising other roles but none onscreen together.

Groucho has the funniest moments, Harpo as Isaac Newton is good too, I believe the only time he was in a color film, we get to see him in red wig. Chico has an interesting scene as a monk advising Christopher Columbus, he plays it completely straight in his only serious role. 

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3 hours ago, Fedya said:

Yeah, you could make the case there's a non-military coup being tried.

Was Clinton's impeachment also a "coup"?

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5 hours ago, Ampersand said:

The Story of Mankind (1957)

And while I can barely put a name to a face, Groucho Marx as a colonist is so him by his delivery and comedic style that you don't even need the mustache to know it's him; with the other Marx brothers enterprising other roles but none onscreen together. And Queen of England, who devoured every bit of the scenery with every word said.

I have difficulty picturing Groucho as the Queen of England.  😛

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On 10/24/2019 at 5:08 AM, Gershwin fan said:

Texas Chainsaw Massacre is a really creepy film imo. The younger brother is my favorite. His performance reminds me a bit of Reinfeld from Browning's Dracula.

"I've got a knife. It's a very good knife!"

"Yeah, I'm sure..." :lol:

The film is on Netflix right now btw but the sound quality leaves a lot to be desired. Even after turning the volume all the way up, I could barely hear it.

“Dog will hunt, heh heh, Dog will hunt.”

Actually, I think that’s from the sequel, but it’s still pretty damn creepy.

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19 hours ago, midwestan said:

I watched all the TCM Remembers shows from 2000-2018

Where? I love when I pop in something I've recorded from TCM and there's one on there. I think they're so well done.

19 hours ago, midwestan said:

The last person shown in these memorials are either the last vestiges of 'Golden Age' icons or persons that were enthusiastic supporters of TCM and its mission to bring as many classic films to as broad an audience as possible.

Great point, something that never occurred to me. 

Carrie Fisher/Debbie Reynolds-drama queens to the end!

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I caught some of Fuedin' Fools this morning with the Bowery Boys. 

Leo Gorcey had his wedding ring on throughout the picture. Whoops.

Fave Sach line: 

What's your name?

Mister X

Oh. How do you sign that?

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Really bummed out that PLAGUE OF THE ZOMBIES has not yet shown up on HULU.

Watched HORROR OF DRACULA for 38th time last night, seemed to me like the print they showed had a really TOP NOTCH, CLEANED-UP AUDIO TRACK.

Forgive me, but I nodded off before the finale, did not see whether or not they used the fully restored ending (which includes more disentegrating, as found in an old Japanese print.)

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23 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Forgive me, but I nodded off before the finale, did not see whether or not they used the fully restored ending (which includes more disentegrating, as found in an old Japanese print.)

They have apparently never used it before, because Nipkow b*tches about it every time it airs.

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2 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

I caught some of Fuedin' Fools this morning with the Bowery Boys. 

Leo Gorcey had his wedding ring on throughout the picture. Whoops.

Fave Sach line: 

What's your name?

Mister X

Oh. How do you sign that?

He was married something like 8 times, so there's a good chance he just kept one on out of habit.

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26 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

They have apparently never used it before, because Nipkow b*tches about it every time it airs.

well, it is pretty cool, i'm glad they found and restored it- at the 52 second mark there is a shot that had not been seen for 50 years until they found ti 3-4 years ago.

when they first found the footage and included it in the blu-ray, i actually posted a thread specifically about it in GENERAL DISCUSSIONS and- ironically?- it bombed. I got no replies, barely any views and it just slunk down to page six in no time.

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i also watched some of THE GORGON (1964)- s'allright, but my main takeaway was damn, Peter Cushing looks great with a beard!

ps- a dash perhaps of Terrence Stamp?

la-gorgone-the-gorgon-year-1964-uk-peter

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