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speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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14 hours ago, kingrat said:

In the Patty Duke or the Susan Hayward role?

In some alternate universe out there, there might be a version of Valley of the Dolls with Anthony Perkins as Patty Duke and Liberace as Susan Hayward.....

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2 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I guess she had to get something for her troubles... even though it was her troubles that gave them troubles. Lol. 

EDIT I am having some voice transcription issues with my phone obviously.

Actually, Patty Duke did an interview and she says that the director of DOLLS was “The meanest SOB I ever worked for” And she claims that he deliberately kept Judy waiting while she was surrounded by people who were feeding her drugs so that she would be a wreck when it was time to do her scenes and he would have an excuse to fire her, which she did. Apparently she was not supposed to keep that pantsuit, but she did. Which makes it all the better.And she claims that he deliberately kept Judy waiting while she was surrounded by people who were feeding her drugs so that she would be a wreck when it was time to do her scenes and he would have an excuse to fire her, which she did. Apparently she was not supposed to keep that pantsuit, but she did. Which makes it all the better.

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32 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

In some alternate universe out there, there might be a version of Valley of the Dolls with Anthony Perkins as Patty Duke and Liberace as Susan Hayward.....

No, ROCK HUDSON as SUSAN HAYWARD!

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

EDIT I am having some voice transcription issues with my phone obviously.

Actually, Patty Duke did an interview and she says that the director of DOLLS was “The meanest SOB I ever worked for” And she claims that he deliberately kept Judy waiting while she was surrounded by people who were feeding her drugs so that she would be a wreck when it was time to do her scenes and he would have an excuse to fire her, which she did. Apparently she was not supposed to keep that pantsuit, but she did. Which makes it all the better.And she claims that he deliberately kept Judy waiting while she was surrounded by people who were feeding her drugs so that she would be a wreck when it was time to do her scenes and he would have an excuse to fire her, which she did. Apparently she was not supposed to keep that pantsuit, but she did. Which makes it all the better.

The point bears repeating! 

If that's the case, that's terrible.  By 1966/1967 (whenever they would have been filming) as far as I can tell, Judy was a disaster.  Wasn't the character of Helen loosely based on her? It's terrible that they were feeding her DOLLS to sabotage her.  Unfortunately for Judy, this was a lifetime of method acting for a part in this film. I'm glad that Judy stole the suit. Serves the director right. 

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

No, ROCK HUDSON as SUSAN HAYWARD!

Tab Hunter could have played the Sharon Tate role. 

Are we just coming up with a reverse gender Valley of the Dolls ?

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1 hour ago, CinemaInternational said:

In some alternate universe out there, there might be a version of Valley of the Dolls with Anthony Perkins as Patty Duke and Liberace as Susan Hayward.....

What a film that would've made. IF ONLY...........

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42 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

No, ROCK HUDSON as SUSAN HAYWARD!

Either way! LOL.

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41 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

The point bears repeating! 

If that's the case, that's terrible.  By 1966/1967 (whenever they would have been filming) as far as I can tell, Judy was a disaster.  Wasn't the character of Helen loosely based on her? It's terrible that they were feeding her DOLLS to sabotage her.  Unfortunately for Judy, this was a lifetime of method acting for a part in this film. I'm glad that Judy stole the suit. Serves the director right. 

No, the character of Helen Lawson was based on Ethel Merman. Neely was the character that was based on Judy.

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Just now, Hibi said:

No, the character of Helen Lawson was based on Ethel Merman. Neely was the character that resembled Judy.

If only somehow this film were made in the 40s (sans production code) with the original inspirations! 

 

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The part about Neely being fired from Helen's show really happened in real life to Betty Hutton. Not sure if she quit or was fired. Ethel had Hutton's only song cut because she was jealous of of the attention she was getting and Betty didnt have much left to her role without the song (forget what musical it was). But Betty had someone in her corner who signed her up with Paramount shortly after and she went on to Hollywood...

 

It was Panama Hattie (after looking it up) Buddy DeSylva was the producer. He became a bigwig at Paramount and took Betty with him..........

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1 minute ago, speedracer5 said:

If only somehow this film were made in the 40s (sans production code) with the original inspirations! 

 

The book covered about 15 years in the characters lives from the mid-40s to the early 60s. In the film, everything is updated to the present time (mid 60s) and happens in what feels like a year!

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7 minutes ago, Hibi said:

The book covered about 15 years in the characters lives from the mid-40s to the early 60s. In the film, everything is updated to the present time (mid 60s) and happens in what feels like a year!

Interesting. I have the book on my book shelf waiting to be read.  I'm still reading Tori Spelling's autobiography.

Neely's ascent and subsequent collapse definitely didn't take place over 15-20 years.  I assumed that it was maybe 1-3 years. Long enough for Neely to become a star, get married, divorced, collapse, then rehab... Sharon Tate's character went overseas to make her "art films" or as Neely so eloquently calls them, "nudies" I assume she was gone for awhile. 

I really wished that the main girl, Anne, had dabbled more with Dolls, she was so boring compared to the other two girls. Lol. She was hooked on dolls for what? 5 minutes?

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Yeah, everything is crammed into a very narrow time window in the film. Nothing changes fashionwise in the film. I didnt read the book till long after I'd seen the film. I was surprised at how tame it was. By today's standards, at least. The downbeat ending was changed to the sappy happy ending for Anne, who stays married to whatshisname and leads a depressing life with the philanderer........

 

Lyon Burke. Even his name is boring.......

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29 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Yeah, everything is crammed into a very narrow time window in the film. Nothing changes fashionwise in the film. I didnt read the book till long after I'd seen the film. I was surprised at how tame it was. By today's standards, at least. The downbeat ending was changed to the sappy happy ending for Anne, who stays married to whatshisname and leads a depressing life with the philanderer........

 

Lyon Burke. Even his name is boring.......

Lyon should have kept it in his pants!  I may have to read Valley of the Dolls next. Maybe I could get my husband to put it on his Audible account and we could have a Valley of the Dolls book club.  I wonder if he'd "read" it...

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The Cruel Ones Poster

The Cruel Ones aka The Hellbenders (1967) dir. Sergio Corbucci, Joseph Cotten is a ruthless ex-Confederate officer who wants to resurrect the South with the help of his sons and a stolen US Army payroll. With numerous cavalry units looking for the outlaws who ambushed the pay wagon, Cotten's scheme has the loot hidden in a coffin with a dance hall gal posing as a grieving widow whenever they are questioned by patrols. A time waster. Familiar Spaghetti Western actor Aldo Sambrell makes an appearance. Impressed with the cinematography, it looks quite a bit like the American West but of course it's all shot in Spain and Italy. They do Mexican Bandits but the Native Americans look a bit dodgy as they always seem to in Spaghetti Westerns. 6/10

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I finally watched FEMALE '33 starring the much talked about Ruth Chatterton "in glorious black & white":

Female_VHS_cover.jpg

It was the only disk from the library's Forbidden Hollywood that I do not own. I didn't like it enough to dupe it.

Ruth Chatterton completely owns this movie, and while I like her - she's beautiful, smart, engaging, I can see why she was never as big a star as say Stanwyck or Blondell. Chatterton has a snobby sounding accented voice, emotionally keeping us at arm's length. This is only the second movie I've seen her in (Dodsworth) and she's played similar roles where her accent "works"for the character, but is off putting.

Chatterton plays the head of a car manufacturer whose boardroom window looks out on belching smokestacks. She has decided to "live life as a man" concentrating on her job & just amusing herself with boy toys. (Mmmm, what's wrong with that?) I like how everything is kept PG, this movie would be titillating for teens.

As "progressive" as it tries for 1933, we get the sap ending. At least George Brent was kind of handsome in this one. I was not distracted by his caboose.

I noticed the exteriors were Frank Lloyd Wright "Ennis" House (the same used in House On Haunted Hill) and this time we see the unique pool design. I also noticed familiar background songs from the same year's hit FOOTLIGHT PARADE like Shanghai Lil used in odd ways, like a guy playing a pipe organ on the wall! 

A "short & sweet" as discussed in another thread, FEMALE was enjoyable, but not worth revisiting.

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author's note- I am in a fragile state of mind lately

1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

I finally watched FEMALE '33 starring the much talked about Ruth Chatterton "in glorious black & white":

 

I noticed the exteriors were Frank Lloyd Wright "Ennis" House (the same used in House On Haunted Hill) and this time we see the unique pool design. I also noticed familiar background songs from the same year's hit FOOTLIGHT PARADE like Shanghai Lil used in odd ways, like a guy playing a pipe organ on the wall! 

 

Or as I think of it, THE ENNIS WRIGHT BUTT UGLY HOUSE.

I like everything else he did, but seriously- that chain draped across the the drive is the LEAST UGLY thing in this photo.

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

I finally watched FEMALE '33 starring the much talked about Ruth Chatterton "in glorious black & white":

Female_VHS_cover.jpg

It was the only disk from the library's Forbidden Hollywood that I do not own. I didn't like it enough to dupe it.

Ruth Chatterton completely owns this movie, and while I like her - she's beautiful, smart, engaging, I can see why she was never as big a star as say Stanwyck or Blondell. Chatterton has a snobby sounding accented voice, emotionally keeping us at arm's length. This is only the second movie I've seen her in (Dodsworth) and she's played similar roles where her accent "works"for the character, but is off putting.

Chatterton plays the head of a car manufacturer whose boardroom window looks out on belching smokestacks. She has decided to "live life as a man" concentrating on her job & just amusing herself with boy toys. (Mmmm, what's wrong with that?) I like how everything is kept PG, this movie would be titillating for teens.

As "progressive" as it tries for 1933, we get the sap ending. At least George Brent was kind of handsome in this one. I was not distracted by his caboose.

I noticed the exteriors were Frank Lloyd Wright "Ennis" House (the same used in House On Haunted Hill) and this time we see the unique pool design. I also noticed familiar background songs from the same year's hit FOOTLIGHT PARADE like Shanghai Lil used in odd ways, like a guy playing a pipe organ on the wall! 

A "short & sweet" as discussed in another thread, FEMALE was enjoyable, but not worth revisiting.

 

Thanks for the compliment! :D

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15 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Lyon should have kept it in his pants!  I may have to read Valley of the Dolls next. Maybe I could get my husband to put it on his Audible account and we could have a Valley of the Dolls book club.  I wonder if he'd "read" it...

I found parts of the book rather boring. It isn't very well written. I guess it just happened at the right time for this tell all type of book.

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1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

I finally watched FEMALE '33 starring the much talked about Ruth Chatterton "in glorious black & white":

Female_VHS_cover.jpg

It was the only disk from the library's Forbidden Hollywood that I do not own. I didn't like it enough to dupe it.

Ruth Chatterton completely owns this movie, and while I like her - she's beautiful, smart, engaging, I can see why she was never as big a star as say Stanwyck or Blondell. Chatterton has a snobby sounding accented voice, emotionally keeping us at arm's length. This is only the second movie I've seen her in (Dodsworth) and she's played similar roles where her accent "works"for the character, but is off putting.

Chatterton plays the head of a car manufacturer whose boardroom window looks out on belching smokestacks. She has decided to "live life as a man" concentrating on her job & just amusing herself with boy toys. (Mmmm, what's wrong with that?) I like how everything is kept PG, this movie would be titillating for teens.

As "progressive" as it tries for 1933, we get the sap ending. At least George Brent was kind of handsome in this one. I was not distracted by his caboose.

I noticed the exteriors were Frank Lloyd Wright "Ennis" House (the same used in House On Haunted Hill) and this time we see the unique pool design. I also noticed familiar background songs from the same year's hit FOOTLIGHT PARADE like Shanghai Lil used in odd ways, like a guy playing a pipe organ on the wall! 

A "short & sweet" as discussed in another thread, FEMALE was enjoyable, but not worth revisiting.

 

Yes, I've seen a half dozen of Chatterton films and she never lost that stage actress aura. Her voice/manner reflects that.

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Glen or Glenda Poster

Glen Or Glenda (1953) 4/10 Youtube

After re watching Ed Wood (1994) I thought I would take a look at this one, not having seen it all the way through in years.

It is pretty bad, though not quite as bad as I remember it. Bela Lugosi is the best thing in it, he performs the ridiculous lines with great gusto. It never seems like a real movie, just some exploitation like Reefer Madness. What makes it interesting today is it's sympathetic portrayal of the title transvestite, it appears to want to make the viewer accept him more as a human being. It has all the stiff acting and ponderous dialogue you would expect from an Ed Wood movie. There is also a scary looking devil character in the nightmare sequence, along with some tame strip tease and bondage moments.  

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18 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

No, ROCK HUDSON as SUSAN HAYWARD!

How about AGNES MOOREHEAD as BOTH!  ;) 

Sepiatone

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The Furies (1950)

I'm not usually one for Westerns, they aren't my favorite genre. How many variations can you do on the sheep people vs cow people rivalry?

This film was a little more interesting than that, thankfully. I borrowed it from the library mainly for Barbara Stanwyck (who is one of my faves), but also because it was a Criterion release. Overall, I liked the film. It had an interesting story and it was different than your regular Western.

In this film, Stanwyck stars as Vance Jeffries (I thought "Vance" was an odd first name for a female character, but it seems like a very Western name), the daughter of a big ranch magnate, T.C. Jeffries, played by Walter Huston. Vance and T.C. have an interesting father-daughter relationship. They are very clearly business partners, they don't have the dynamic of a father-daughter. The Jeffries family owns and operates a large New Mexico cattle ranch, "The Furies."

However, it seems that T.C. has gotten a little too cocky in his endeavors to the point where he's distributing his own TC branded currency as legal tender. After his wife passes, TC makes a promise to daughter Vance that she will assume the role of running and maintaining The Furies--a role that Vance is all too eager to take on. However, it all comes to head when her father meets Flora Barrett (Judith Anderson), a golddigger who immediately insinuates herself into the ranch operations and makes it known to Vance that she intends to run The Furies.

Behind all of this drama, Vance also has a love-hate relationship with Rip Darrow (Wendell Corey), the local banker, but also the descendant of the Darrow family and former owners of "The Darrow Strip" a prime piece of property that makes up about 10% of The Furies ranch. Vance becomes infuriated with Darrow when he accepts a bribe from T.C. to keep Vance out of his life.

Vance is also in love with Juan Herrera (Gilbert Roland), a man whom she's known since childhood. Herrera and his family and others have been living in a remote part of The Furies. I speculated that this was their land prior to the Jeffries moving in and they were "allowed" to stay as a concession or compromise. However, after Flora Barrett moves in and slowly takes over, T.C. decides that Juan and his crew need to leave The Furies immediately. This infuriates Vance and she decides to get even.

I thought this was an interesting film. There were really no clear cut "good" or "bad" characters, except for Juan who very clearly was good. Vance, T.C., Flora, and Rip all flip flopped between seeming good then all of a sudden seeming terrible. I took from this film that money, greed, and power were the true villains of the story.

I thought the cast was great, it was interesting to see Wendell Corey in a more villainous role. He's still a bit bland, but at least he has a bit of an edge. I love Stanwyck, so she was fantastic. I also thought Gilbert Roland was excellent too. This was the second film I'd seen with Walter Huston and I enjoyed his role in this very much. Judith Anderson is always excellent. Beulah Bondi has a small, but critical role as the wife of the banker who holds the mortgage over The Furies. Albert Dekker is also featured in a small role at the beginning of the film. I cannot help but see Dekker's name and be reminded of how he died and the coroner's decision that Dekker died of "death by misadventure (a term no longer used today)." Look that up on Wikipedia. It is worth the read.

I liked this film, but I don't think it'd be one that I would watch over and over.

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On 10/26/2019 at 8:17 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

(I apologize, I may "wander off the farm" with this one)

 

so, generally i enjoy waking up on a saturday morning because i can catch TCM UNDERGROUND on my west coast feed, [which reminds me, I forgot to review SUGAR HILL from last week- I liked it] this morning, BEYOND THE VALLEY OF THE DOLLS was on.

 

Omg. I am listening to a new (to me) movie podcast: The Movies That Made Me and episode #1, they are touting the brilliance that is Beyond the Valley of the Dolls, and they even complimented the editing! Haha.

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5 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Omg. I am listening to a new (to me) movie podcast: The Movies That Made Me and episode #1, they are touting the brilliance that is Beyond the Valley of the Dolls, and they even complimented the editing! Haha.

Different strokes, I guess.

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