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speedracer5

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

The Furies (1950)

I'm not usually one for Westerns, they aren't my favorite genre. How many variations can you do on the sheep people vs cow people rivalry?

 

With its moody black and white photography, Anthony Mann's The Furies has been cited by some as a western noir. I like the film very much, a key reason being the performances with, for me, Walter Huston's flamboyant, larger-than-life portrayal of the landowner father a standout. A great farewell performance by the actor.

I'm not a Stanwyck fan but she's very solid in this film as the strong willed daughter who comes into conflict with her father. Strong work, as well, by Judith Anderson and, in one of the most sympathetic characterizations of his career, Gilbert Roland. While his is a supporting role, I wish that Roland could have played more characters as well written as this one.

The one casting fly in the ointment for me was the cold and charmless Wendell Corey, who has, unfortunately, a lot of screen time. Any time he was on screen I couldn't wait for the narrative to switch back to Huston or Roland.

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8 minutes ago, TomJH said:

With its moody black and white photography, Anthony Mann's The Furies has been cited by some as a western noir. I like the film very much, a key reason being the performances with, for me, Walter Huston's flamboyant, larger-than-life portrayal of the landowner father a standout. A great farewell performance by the actor.

I'm nor a Stanwyck fan but she's very solid in this film as the strong willed daughter who comes into conflict with her father. Strong work, as well, by Judith Anderson and, in one of the most sympathetic characterizations of his career, Gilbert Roland. While his is a supporting role, I wish that Roland could have played more characters as well written as this one.

The one casting fly in the ointment for me was the cold and charmless Wendell Corey, who has, unfortunately, a lot of screen time. Any time he was on screen I couldn't wait for the narrative to switch back to Huston or Roland.

I agree about the cinematography. I really liked the look of this film.  I also loved Gilbert Roland in this film, I look forward to seeing more of his work. Roland reminded me of Antonio Banderas.

I completely agree with you re: Wendell Corey.  He was a little more interesting than he was in Rear Window (although I think his blandness worked for that character), but I wished that they would have cast someone with more charisma.  I couldn't understand why Stanwyck wanted to be with him so much.  I kept thinking that she had an angle because of his status at the bank or something. I figured his angle was the Darrow Strip land that he wanted back from Stanwyck and her father.  But then all those theories fizzled out.  Stanwyck and Corey had such a terrible relationship in this film, I just didn't get it.  It would have made a tiny bit of sense had Corey been attractive and really charming or something.  I am trying to think of someone who would have been better... Maybe Dan Duryea? Or maybe John Derek? Hmm... Maybe William Holden? Robert Mitchum? Mitchum may have been too big a star, but possibly Holden if he hadn't made Sunset Blvd. yet.

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43 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I agree about the cinematography. I really liked the look of this film.  I also loved Gilbert Roland in this film, I look forward to seeing more of his work. Roland reminded me of Antonio Banderas.

I completely agree with you re: Wendell Corey.  He was a little more interesting than he was in Rear Window (although I think his blandness worked for that character), but I wished that they would have cast someone with more charisma.  I couldn't understand why Stanwyck wanted to be with him so much.  I kept thinking that she had an angle because of his status at the bank or something. I figured his angle was the Darrow Strip land that he wanted back from Stanwyck and her father.  But then all those theories fizzled out.  Stanwyck and Corey had such a terrible relationship in this film, I just didn't get it.  It would have made a tiny bit of sense had Corey been attractive and really charming or something.  I am trying to think of someone who would have been better... Maybe Dan Duryea? Or maybe John Derek? Hmm... Maybe William Holden? Robert Mitchum? Mitchum may have been too big a star, but possibly Holden if he hadn't made Sunset Blvd. yet.

Hal Wallis was the Producer and Paramount the studio,  and Corey was under contract with Paramount largely due to Wallis.    I.e.  Paramount was paying Corey,  period,  and thus was going to use him,  especially in a Wallis production.   

Paramount wasn't going to spend money on a loan-out actor since they already had to pay for the services of Stanwyck.  

I hear you about those other actors,   but that was unlikely for a Wallis project:  he had actors he favored and for some reason Corey was part of the group.   (and Corey was effective in some of these Wallis projects like Desert Fury, I Walk Alone and Sorry Wrong Number,,,  but less so with Stanwyck in The File On Thelma Jordan since romance wasn't his strong suit).

PS:   Paramount did have John Lund under contract as a second-tier 'star' actor;  Yea,  I don't know if that would have been an improvement.

 

 

 

 

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50 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I agree about the cinematography. I really liked the look of this film.  I also loved Gilbert Roland in this film, I look forward to seeing more of his work. Roland reminded me of Antonio Banderas.

I completely agree with you re: Wendell Corey.  He was a little more interesting than he was in Rear Window (although I think his blandness worked for that character), but I wished that they would have cast someone with more charisma.  I couldn't understand why Stanwyck wanted to be with him so much.  I kept thinking that she had an angle because of his status at the bank or something. I figured his angle was the Darrow Strip land that he wanted back from Stanwyck and her father.  But then all those theories fizzled out.  Stanwyck and Corey had such a terrible relationship in this film, I just didn't get it.  It would have made a tiny bit of sense had Corey been attractive and really charming or something.  I am trying to think of someone who would have been better... Maybe Dan Duryea? Or maybe John Derek? Hmm... Maybe William Holden? Robert Mitchum? Mitchum may have been too big a star, but possibly Holden if he hadn't made Sunset Blvd. yet.

If the casting Gods had been kind, Mitchum would have been a good choice.

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Just now, TomJH said:

If the casting Gods had been kind, Mitchum would have been a good choice.

Or even if we're sticking to Paramount, Fred MacMurray I think would have been interesting.

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Dr. Cyclops (1940)  -  6/10

dr-cyclops-movie-poster-1940-1010507262.

Albert Dekker stars as mad scientist Dr. Thorkel, derisively nicknamed "Dr. Cyclops" because he has bad eyesight and wears thick glasses (yeah, the nickname doesn't make sense to me either, as the Cyclops had one eye, not thick glasses). Thorkel's experiments with radium allow him to shrink living creatures down to tiny size (because that's how radium works), which he does to a party of visitors who he had invited down to his secluded South American lair in order to look at something and then leave (really). The cast of shrunken heroes includes Thomas Coley, Janice Logan, Charles Halton, Victor Kilian, and Frank Yaconelli as "Pedro". Paul Fix shows up briefly at the beginning, long enough to get murdered in the film's best visual shot. 

drcyclops.jpg

I hadn't watched this since I was a kid, and decided to revisit it since it's included in a box set I have. I liked the giant sets for the little people to run around, particularly the big cactus. There's some animal action with a black cat (named Satanis!), a dog, a bear, a parrot, and even an alligator. The cast is rather dull, though, with only Dekker's scenery-chewing standing out. Directed by Ernest B. Shoedsack of King Kong fame, and nominated for an Oscar for Special Effects (it lost to The Thief of Bagdad). The poster calls it "The Picture That Was Made Behind Locked Doors!" 

dr-cyclops-dog-miniture-shrunken-people.

drcyclopscactus.gif

 

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3 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Dr. Cyclops (1940)  -  6/10

dr-cyclops-movie-poster-1940-1010507262.

Albert Dekker stars as mad scientist Dr. Thorkel, derisively nicknamed "Dr. Cyclops" because he has bad eyesight and wears thick glasses (yeah, the nickname doesn't make sense to me either, as the Cyclops had one eye, not thick glasses). Thorkel's experiments with radium allow him to shrink living creatures down to tiny size (because that's how radium works), which he does to a party of visitors who he had invited down to his secluded South American lair in order to look at something and then leave (really). The cast of shrunken heroes includes Thomas Coley, Janice Logan, Charles Halton, Victor Kilian, and Frank Yaconelli as "Pedro". Paul Fix shows up briefly at the beginning, long enough to get murdered in the film's best visual shot. 

drcyclops.jpg

I hadn't watched this since I was a kid, and decided to revisit it since it's included in a box set I have. I liked the giant sets for the little people to run around, particularly the big cactus. There's some animal action with a black cat (named Satanis!), a dog, a bear, a parrot, and even an alligator. The cast is rather dull, though, with only Dekker's scenery-chewing standing out. Directed by Ernest B. Shoedsack of King Kong fame, and nominated for an Oscar for Special Effects (it lost to The Thief of Bagdad). The poster calls it "The Picture That Was Made Behind Locked Doors!" 

dr-cyclops-dog-miniture-shrunken-people.

drcyclopscactus.gif

 

This looks like my kind of movie.  I am interested in the scenes with the parrot. Birds seem to pop up in old movies a lot, but the type of bird is hard to identify in black and white--unless the type of bird has distinguishing physical characteristics e.g. a toucan's beak or something. 

Every time I see Albert Dekker's name in the credits, I cannot help but think of how he died and his cause of death: Death by Misadventure. Knowing what I know about Dekker's proclivities in his personal life, it definitely adds an extra layer to his characterizations. 

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51 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I agree about the cinematography. I really liked the look of this film.  I also loved Gilbert Roland in this film, I look forward to seeing more of his work. Roland reminded me of Antonio Banderas.

I completely agree with you re: Wendell Corey.  He was a little more interesting than he was in Rear Window (although I think his blandness worked for that character), but I wished that they would have cast someone with more charisma.  I couldn't understand why Stanwyck wanted to be with him so much.  I kept thinking that she had an angle because of his status at the bank or something. I figured his angle was the Darrow Strip land that he wanted back from Stanwyck and her father.  But then all those theories fizzled out.  Stanwyck and Corey had such a terrible relationship in this film, I just didn't get it.  It would have made a tiny bit of sense had Corey been attractive and really charming or something.  I am trying to think of someone who would have been better... Maybe Dan Duryea? Or maybe John Derek? Hmm... Maybe William Holden? Robert Mitchum? Mitchum may have been too big a star, but possibly Holden if he hadn't made Sunset Blvd. yet.

 

Wendell Corey is a solid actor oh, but he has absolutely no sex appeal.

 

The first time I saw him was in Elvis Presley's second movie "Loving You". He was jealous of Elvis because his girlfriend, Liz Scott, was working closely with the singer to promote him. I saw this film on the big screen in Technicolor, and Corey had reason to be jealous. LOL

Corey gave up another solid performance in a post-war family/thriller called "Any Number Can Play", a MGM Clark Gable vehicle.

In this he is married to Gable's sister-in-law Audrey Totter and has no balls at all, as he not only has to live in Clark Gable's house, but he also has to work for Gable because he has no other way of making a living.

He's very convincing as a jerk who has no shame by trying to win back his balls by sabotaging Gable's gambling casino for-profit. That's gratitude for you.

Corey is such a matter of fact actor, that he was perfect for his "Rear Window" role or any role where he doesn't have to show a romantic appeal or have much charisma.

I can remember being so surprised the year I saw he was president of the Academy because I didn't think he had enough charisma even to do that job. But he did look good in his white tie and tails.

 

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4 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

 

Wendell Corey is a solid actor oh, but he has absolutely no sex appeal.

 

The first time I saw him was in Elvis Presley's second movie "Loving You". He was jealous of Elvis because his girlfriend, Liz Scott, was working closely with the singer to promote him. I saw this film on the big screen in Technicolor, and Corey had reason to be jealous. LOL

Corey gave up another solid performance in a post-war family/thriller called "Any Number Can Play", a MGM Clark Gable vehicle.

In this he is married to Gable's sister-in-law Audrey Totter and has no balls at all, as he not only has to live in Clark Gable's house, but he also has to work for Gable because he has no other way of making a living.

He's very convincing as a jerk who has no shame by trying to win back his balls by sabotaging Gable's gambling casino for-profit. That's gratitude for you.

Corey is such a matter of fact actor, that he was perfect for his "Rear Window" role or any role where he doesn't have to show a romantic appeal or have much charisma.

I can remember being so surprised the year I saw he was president of the Academy because I didn't think he had enough charisma even to do that job. But he did look good in his white tie and tails.

 

I haven't seen Loving You.  I do enjoy Viva Las Vegas and Kissin' Cousins, so I'll need to add this to my list.  I also like Clark Gable and Audrey Totter.  I've never heard of Any Number Can Play, so I'll keep a look out for this film as well.

Corey has zero sex appeal. I do enjoy films featuring eye candy, but as someone who also enjoys SZ Sakall and Sydney Greenstreet, eye candy isn't mandatory.  However, Corey is so boring.  At least be interesting or something. I know there are others like George Brent who are often cast alongside leading ladies with strong personalities and they're usually decent.  But Corey cannot even be interesting alongside Stanwyck.  I couldn't understand why Stanwyck wanted him so badly.  If her motive was his power as the banker, or his wanting to take back his land from her ranch, or something that else that would benefit her (financially or socially), then I could get it.  But that didn't seem to be her motive.  I wanted her to get together with Gilbert Roland. 

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3 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

*I haven't seen Loving You.  I do enjoy Viva Las Vegas and Kissin' Cousins, so I'll need to add this to my list.  I also like Clark Gable and Audrey Totter.  I've never heard of Any Number Can Play, so I'll keep a look out for this film as well.

Corey has zero sex appeal. I do enjoy films featuring eye candy, but as someone who also enjoys SZ Sakall and Sydney Greenstreet, eye candy isn't mandatory.  However, Corey is so boring.  At least be interesting or something. I know there are others like George Brent who are often cast alongside leading ladies with strong personalities and they're usually decent.  But Corey cannot even be interesting alongside Stanwyck.  I couldn't understand why Stanwyck wanted him so badly.  If her motive was his power as the banker, or his wanting to take back his land from her ranch, or something that else that would benefit her (financially or socially), then I could get it.  But that didn't seem to be her motive.  I wanted her to get together with Gilbert Roland. 

I don't think looks have everything to do with sex appeal at all.

I find Broderick Crawford and Lon Chaney Jr to be very sexy. And these are two guys who really were friends who spent alot of their time trying to beat up each other. That's the kind of friendship they had.

And when you look at the career of Paul Douglas, or even Tom Ewell-- I just bet some women found them sexy too.

 

*But you really do have to see "Loving You" because it's more of an autobiographical movie and it certainly is superior to most of the junk that he did later on. Plus if you love his music, the songs are superb!

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10 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

I don't think looks have everything to do with sex appeal at all.

I find Broderick Crawford and Lon Chaney Jr to be very sexy. And these are two guys who really were friends who spent alot of their time trying to beat up each other. That's the kind of friendship they had.

And when you look at the career of Paul Douglas, or even Tom Ewell-- I just bet some women found them sexy too.

*But you really do have to see "Loving You" because it's more of an autobiographical movie and it certainly is superior to most of the junk that he did later on. Plus if you love his music, the songs are superb!

I agree with the looks thing, I sometimes find Claude Rains and Humphrey Bogart attractive, so I would agree that personality plays a role.  But Wendell Corey doesn't have a personality, or at least doesn't bring one to his on-screen persona. Or maybe his lack of personality is his on-screen persona. I don't know. 

I think with anyone/anything, they either do something for you, or they don't. 

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7 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Ruth Chatterton completely owns this movie, and while I like her - she's beautiful, smart, engaging, I can see why she was never as big a star as say Stanwyck or Blondell. Chatterton has a snobby sounding accented voice, emotionally keeping us at arm's length.

Interesting take. I didn't know she had an accent, can't remember it. But she does play unlikable characters, strong, pushy, and not sympathetic. I often wondered why she wasn't a bigger star. Sometimes that happens without really knowing why. She is terrific in FEMALE and even better in DODSWORTH. I always wondered why Marian Marsh (for instance) didn't become a star. It seems to me that she and even others would have more likely than Bette Davis to achieve stardom. But Bette, as we know, worked incredibly hard at it.

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36 minutes ago, Princess of Tap said:

The first time I saw him was in Elvis Presley's second movie "Loving You". He was jealous of Elvis because his girlfriend, Liz Scott, was working closely with the singer to promote him. I saw this film on the big screen in Technicolor, and Corey had reason to be jealous.

Yet another Hal Wallis production that features under exclusive contract with Wallis actress Liz Scott,  and under contract at Paramount due to Wallis,   Corey.    "Loving You" was made 10 years after they both were in the Wallis production Desert Fury.   

PS:   John Hodiak was in Desert Fury and he would have been a better fit than Corey in The Furies.

 

 

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7 minutes ago, laffite said:

Interesting take. I didn't know she had an accent, can't remember it. But she does play unlikable characters, strong, pushy, and not sympathetic. I often wondered why she wasn't a bigger star. Sometimes that happens without really knowing why. She is terrific in FEMALE and even better in DODSWORTH. I always wondered why Marian Marsh (for instance) didn't become a star. It seems to me that she and even others would have more likely than Bette Davis to achieve stardom. But Bette, as we know, worked incredibly hard at it.

Her age was part of it. She was already 40 by the end of '32, which is old in Hollywood-actress years. Her film career was basically over by the time she appeared in Dodsworth in '36. Warners considered her too old and not bankable enough.

I liked her in the five or six films I've seen her in, and wish that she'd had more good roles in memorable movies.

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Just now, LawrenceA said:

Her age was part of it. She was already 40 by the end of '32, which is old in Hollywood-actress years. Her film career was basically over by the time she appeared in Dodsworth in '36. Warners considered her too old and not bankable enough.

I liked her in the five or six films I've seen her in, and wish that she'd had more good roles in memorable movies.

And as if to reinforce the age issue, there was that scene in Dodsworth where Maria Ouspenskaya keeps ridiculing her for going after a man younger than she. Kind of like rubbing salt in wounds....

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The White Gorilla (1945)  -  2/10 or 9/10

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My favorite bad movie of the 1940's is this poverty row travesty starring Ray "Crash" Corrigan as Great White Hunter Steve Collins, who has traveled to Darkest Africa in search of the elusive White Gorilla. Much of the movie is comprised of footage from the 1927 silent adventure Perils of the Jungle, footage which Corrigan relates to a group of men in a trading post (including a sweaty Francis Ford, brother of John Ford). The silent footage tells the story of a group of white explorers who get into trouble with natives and the local fauna, only to be repeatedly rescued by Kimpo the White Jungle Boy (Bobby Nelson). Also featuring Lorraine Miller and "An All-Star Cast!"

MV5BN2NiYjQyYjgtOTQzOC00YmI5LWEwMGEtMjdj

Corrigan, a familiar face in dozens of low-budget westerns and serials, was also known for his frequent portrayals of gorillas, as he owned his own gorilla costumes. In one epic scene here, the White Gorilla (Corrigan) gets to battle another guy in a regular gorilla costume. The silent footage is unintentionally hilarious (Kimpo is quite the hero), while the writing for the new footage is frequently laughable ("The jungle - weird, mysterious.", "I've seen a lot of queer animals in the jungle, but none quite like the White Gorilla"). And it's only 61 minutes long. The 40's were a scarce decade for truly memorable bad movies, and for me, this one stands above the meager pack. Not to be confused with White Pongo, also from 1945 and also featuring a white gorilla.

MV5BODU5ZjgyZjktYWVjMi00MGMyLTgxNjctMDU3

 

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27 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

And as if to reinforce the age issue, there was that scene in Dodsworth where Maria Ouspenskaya keeps ridiculing her for going after a man younger than she. Kind of like rubbing salt in wounds....

It was my understanding the ridiculing was because she was too old to have children.

PS:  I should have stated too old to want to have children   (because physically I assume she wasn't too-old).

 

 

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2 hours ago, laffite said:

Interesting take. I didn't know she had an accent, can't remember it. But she does play unlikable characters, strong, pushy, and not sympathetic. I often wondered why she wasn't a bigger star. Sometimes that happens without really knowing why. She is terrific in FEMALE and even better in DODSWORTH. I always wondered why Marian Marsh (for instance) didn't become a star. It seems to me that she and even others would have more likely than Bette Davis to achieve stardom. But Bette, as we know, worked incredibly hard at it.

Ruth WAS big in the early 30s. She won back to back Best Actress nominations in '29 and '30. But by '34 her career had waned and Warners dropped her. By '37 she had finished with Hollywood and went back to the stage. She also directed plays and became an author in her later years.......

It wasn't so much that she had an accent, it was more her modulated way of speaking...

Ironically, Dodsworth would turn out to be her last Hollywood film.

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2 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I find Broderick Crawford and Lon Chaney Jr to be very sexy. And Paul Douglas-- I just bet some women found them sexy too.

🙋🏾‍♀️

I am one of those women.

Hey, I work hard & play hard, tough cookie. There aren't many men who can keep up with me. Those three guys could & would make it fun. Their affable personalities are part of their appeal. Gable is one of those kind of guys too with added bonus of cute face (horrible physique tho) and really sexy voice.

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11 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

🙋🏾‍♀️

I am one of those women.

Hey, I work hard & play hard, tough cookie. There aren't many men who can keep up with me. Those three guys could & would make it fun. Their affable personalities are part of their appeal. Gable is one of those kind of guys too with added bonus of cute face (horrible physique tho) and really sexy voice.

While I wouldn't want to be with one of these guys in real life, I seem to gravitate toward the "cute bad boy with a soft heart" type.  A variation on this would be the cute, sophisticated, cad type. And of course, there has to be a level of intellect there, I wouldn't want to be with someone who is all looks and no brains. That'd get old quickly.

I noticed that a lot of my crushes seem to have the same type of hair and overall look, and presumed intelligence level, and they all share physical and intellectual similarities with my husband. So I obviously have a "type" that appeals to me. 

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4 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I agree about the cinematography. I really liked the look of this film.  I also loved Gilbert Roland in this film, I look forward to seeing more of his work. Roland reminded me of Antonio Banderas.

I completely agree with you re: Wendell Corey.  He was a little more interesting than he was in Rear Window (although I think his blandness worked for that character), but I wished that they would have cast someone with more charisma.  I couldn't understand why Stanwyck wanted to be with him so much.  I kept thinking that she had an angle because of his status at the bank or something. I figured his angle was the Darrow Strip land that he wanted back from Stanwyck and her father.  But then all those theories fizzled out.  Stanwyck and Corey had such a terrible relationship in this film, I just didn't get it.  It would have made a tiny bit of sense had Corey been attractive and really charming or something.  I am trying to think of someone who would have been better... Maybe Dan Duryea? Or maybe John Derek? Hmm... Maybe William Holden? Robert Mitchum? Mitchum may have been too big a star, but possibly Holden if he hadn't made Sunset Blvd. yet.

My top pick would have been Richard Widmark, who has both the edge and the sex appeal. Glenn Ford would have worked, too. All of the gentlemen that others have suggested would probably have been better than Wendell Corey, and would make the ending work better. Nonetheless, The Furies is a big favorite of mine, although Stanwyck is about 40 and Vance should probably be in her early to mid twenties. Gilbert Roland is wonderful, and Judith Anderson gets my vote as best supporting actress of the year. I don't think anyone has mentioned Blanche Yurka as Gilbert Roland's mother. She usually scares the willies out of me, and that's exactly what's called for here.

I actually find Wendell Corey somewhat attractive--better than Paul Douglas, that's for sure. I like him opposite Stanwyck in The File on Thelma Jordon, but he's playing a weak man who's a lawyer, and is effectively cast that way. He's also excellent as a drunken flunky in The Big Knife, probably stealing the picture, as the lead actors have to spout reams of Clifford Odets' overblown dialogue.

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3 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Corey was effective in some of these Wallis projects like Desert Fury, I Walk Alone and Sorry Wrong Number

He's pretty good in in a great little Tiki Noir Hell's Half Acre (1954) from  Republic Pictures, it's quite the cast along with Wendell Corey, Evelyn Keyes, Elsa Lanchester (she plays a Honolulu cabby), Marie Windsor, Jesse White, Philip Ahn, and Keye Luke.

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

He's pretty good in in a great little Tiki Noir Hell's Half Acre (1954) from  Republic Pictures, it's quite the cast along with Wendell Corey, Evelyn Keyes, Elsa Lanchester (she plays a Honolulu cabby), Marie Windsor, Jesse White, Philip Ahn, and Keye Luke.

I agree,  that is a nice "little Tiki noir".   Too bad it is from Republic Pictures since TCM rarely shows films from that studio (well unless the star is John Wayne). 

My focus was on the films Corey made that were produced by Wallis,,,  the Hollywood guy that discovered him (as well as his frequent co-star,  Liz Scott).

PS:  Another Tiki noir would be World for Ransom with Dan Duryea.   TCM has shown this film,  but not in a long time.    

HellAcrePoster.jpgWorld for Ransom movie poster.jpg

 

 

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3 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I find Broderick Crawford and Lon Chaney Jr to be very sexy.

And when you look at the career of Paul Douglas, or even Tom Ewell-- I just bet some women found them sexy too.

 

 

1 hour ago, TikiSoo said:

 

  3 hours ago, Princess of Tap said:

I find Broderick Crawford and Lon Chaney Jr to be very sexy. And Paul Douglas-- I just bet some women found them sexy too.

 

I am one of those women.

TikiSoo, I couldn't help but notice that when you re-produced Princess' list of sexy men you cut out Tom Ewell's name.

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I have no idea why.

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I love Wendell Corey in A Holiday Affair because his lack of sex appeal is a running joke through out the movie.  Janet Leigh has been dating him for years when she meets Robert Mitchum after which Wendell no longer has any chance at all, even her in-laws and her little boy are rooting for Mitchum.  Wendell's character accepts all this disrespect with so much good nature and humor I'd fallen for him by the time it was over.  His most charming role.

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