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1 minute ago, Hibi said:

LOL! For some reason I can never remember his name. Can't stand him either.

HE'S NOT TERRIBLY MEMORABLE...he also has a tendency to make light of the HORRIBLE CRIMES he is investigating.

I also remember one episode about a girl who was murdered while being an extra in a KID ROCK VIDEO, and MORRISON'S PRONUNCIATION OF THE WORD  "BAWITABA" MUST BE HEARD!

every time i see him, all i think is "BA WITTA BA"

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SCORNED: LOVE KILLS will have a scene, for example, where a woman burns down her ex's house and kills his dog and maxes out his credit cards and stabs his mom and then they take it over to the expert PSYCHOLOGUSTS to tell us "now, we see here that Charmaine is lashing out and focused on adding fuel to this fire- she is not willing to let this guy go gracefully. This is what we sometimes see in people with personality disorders...."

Like, really? Ya think, DR. OBVIOUS?

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The Connection Poster

The Connection (1961) 8/10 NY revival theater

A documentary film maker films a room full of heroin junkies waiting for their stash to arrive from their connection.

This was recently shown in NY's Film Forum for the centennial of director Shirley Clarke. It was based on a play which is obvious since it all takes place in one room. It is raw,compelling and totally engrossing. The characters speak directly to the camera which makes it an intimate experience. There are only two actors that I recognized, William Redfield (One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest) as the director and Roscoe Lee Browne (he appeared in many TV shows of the 1970s and 1980s, including All In The Family and Maude) as the cameraman.

The dialogue is has some shocking profanity with numerous mentions of s**t, I did not realize it could be used in a 1961 film, even in an underground independent feature. There is also a pretty graphic "shooting up" scene. 

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9 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

The Connection Poster

The Connection (1961) 8/10 NY revival theater

 There are only two actors that I recognized, William Redfield (One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest) as the director and Roscoe Lee Browne (he appeared in many TV shows of the 1970s and 1980s, including All In The Family and Maude) as the cameraman.

 

ANY TIME ROSCOE LEE BROWNE is in something, he makes it worth watching.

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25 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

HE'S NOT TERRIBLY MEMORABLE...he also has a tendency to make light of the HORRIBLE CRIMES he is investigating.

I also remember one episode about a girl who was murdered while being an extra in a KID ROCK VIDEO, and MORRISON'S PRONUNCIATION OF THE WORD  "BAWITABA" MUST BE HEARD!

every time i see him, all i think is "BA WITTA BA"

LOL. It's his voice that creeps me out. Bill Hader did a great send up of him years ago on SNL in some Halloween skit......

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23 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

SCORNED: LOVE KILLS will have a scene, for example, where a woman burns down her ex's house and kills his dog and maxes out his credit cards and stabs his mom and then they take it over to the expert PSYCHOLOGUSTS to tell us "now, we see here that Charmaine is lashing out and focused on adding fuel to this fire- she is not willing to let this guy go gracefully. This is what we sometimes see in people with personality disorders...."

Like, really? Ya think, DR. OBVIOUS?

LOL. Yeah, I hate those 2 people who comment on the proceedings on that show.  What a waste of time. That one hasnt been on in awhile. That male psychologist HAS to be gay!

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

SCORNED: LOVE KILLS will have a scene, for example, where a woman burns down her ex's house and kills his dog and maxes out his credit cards and stabs his mom and then they take it over to the expert PSYCHOLOGUSTS to tell us "now, we see here that Charmaine is lashing out and focused on adding fuel to this fire- she is not willing to let this guy go gracefully. This is what we sometimes see in people with personality disorders...."

Like, really? Ya think, DR. OBVIOUS?

Geez. With "expert" commentary like that, they should have hired the guys from Mystery Science Theater 3000 to  provide their opinion.

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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

That episode just aired on ME-TV this past Saturday. I had forgotten it completely too.

All my ringtones are Star Trek quotes. Scottie's last line in Tribbles' is designated to work related contacts.

I have a habit of saying, "Oh, my god, Jim!" even though Bones leaves out the oh. 

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I thought maybe the one set in Flint, Michigan might just as well have been set in Lanford.

It had that blue collar vibe to it. Of course Flint, Michigan has had a lot of back luck in the

past few decades. There was one a few weeks earlier set in NC which was just a few

counties over. I'm on the lookout, just in case. Okay, I kind of like Keith Morrison. Great

voice and he gets a few good wisecracks into the interviews. Compared to Josh, Ben looks

like Cary Grant. 

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More films I’ve seen recently.

There was After the Thin Man(1936). I thought it was a pretty good follow up to the first film. Powell and Loy are magic together, and seeing Jimmy Stewart before he became a big star was quite a treat. Not quite as good as the first though. 8/10.

I also recently saw Laura(1944). I personally thought this movie was brilliant. Loved the cast, suspense and cinematography. One of the best 1940s noirs I’ve seen. 9/10

Then there was Humoresque(1946). This was a good film. Very melodramatic but easy to digest. Loved John Garfield and Joan Crawford was good but it wasn’t her best performance. I think it was a little too drawn out but I liked it nonetheless. 7/10. 

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The Pleasure Garden  (1925)  -  6/10

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Silent British melodrama that marked Alfred Hitchcock's feature directing debut. Showgirl Patsy (Virginia Valli) looks out for newcomer Jill (Carmelita Geraghty). However, it isn't long until Jill starts meeting wealthy suitors, including Prince Ivan (Karl Falkenberg), after which Jill has little time for her former flame Hugh (John Stuart) or the concerned Patsy. Meanwhile, Patsy meets Hugh's coworker Levet (Miles Mander) and they get married, which ends up being a mistake. Also featuring Ferdinand Martini, Florence Helminger, Georg H. Schnell, and Elizabeth Pappritz as "the Native Girl". 

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One of the film's first shots is of a corpulent older man gazing lasciviously at a performing blonde, setting the stage for much of the director's future output. The version I watched was heavily truncated, but there was still enough to see to illustrate Hitchcock's genuine talent behind the camera, even at this early stage. The material is strictly cornball melodrama, but I liked the European locations (Italy and Germany), and some of the transitional edits were nice. The film's last act gets darker than many of its contemporaries. 

Source: YouTube

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Lawman (1971)

A lawman arrives in a small western town, determined to bring in a gang of cattlemen who accidentally killed a man when they shot up his town. The lawman is grim and single minded, with the nickname "The Widow Maker." He is seen by the town residents as a killer with a badge on his chest, and they want him out of town.

Intriguing, thought provoking western, as directed by Michael Winner, that maintains interest throughout. The cast is fine, headlined by Burt Lancaster as the relentless, morally ambiguous title character, Lee J. Cobb as the landowning boss of the cattlemen who hopes to avoid any killing by buying off the lawman, and Sherri North in a fine performance as a former girlfriend of Lancaster's, now the woman of one of the men he seeks. Robert Duvall has an early role as one of the cowboys, along with a brutish Albert Salmi, another of the cattlemen, ready to confront the lawman and get it over with.

The standout performance of the film, though, comes from Robert Ryan in a complex portrayal of the small town sheriff, years before a celebrated gun fighting name, now content to be bought out by Cobb's character, who "owns" the town. He is laughed at by some but there is still a streak of integrity in his character. He's tired of it all but he's no coward. One is never quite sure until the end how Ryan's character will play his hand.

The film's violent climax is strangely unsatisfactory and morally dubious but this western is more than worth a viewing.

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3 out of 4

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6 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Lawman (1971)

A lawman arrives in a small western town, determined to bring in a gang of cattlemen who accidentally killed a man when they shot up his town. The lawman is grim and single minded, with the nickname "The Widow Maker." He is seen by the town residents as a killer with a badge on his chest, and they want him out of town.

Intriguing, thought provoking western, as directed by Michael Winner, that maintains interest throughout. The cast is fine, headlined by Burt Lancaster as the relentless, morally ambiguous title character, Lee J. Cobb as the landowning boss of the cattlemen who hopes to avoid any killing by buying off the lawman, and Sherri North in a fine performance as a former girlfriend of Lancaster's, now the woman of one of the men he seeks. Robert Duvall has an early role as one of the cowboys, along with a brutish Albert Salmi, another of the cattlemen, ready to confront the lawman and get it over with.

The standout performance of the film, though, comes from Robert Ryan in a complex portrayal of the small town sheriff, years before a celebrated gun fighting name, now content to be bought out by Cobb's character, who "owns" the town. He is laughed at by some but there is still a streak of integrity in his character. He's tired of it all but he's no coward. One is never quite sure until the end how Ryan's character will play his hand.

The film's violent climax is strangely unsatisfactory and morally dubious but this western is more than worth a viewing.

burt-as-lawman-2.jpg?w=878

3 out of 4

I remember watching this during my big western phase a few years ago. I remember liking it. I agree that the ending is kinda disappointing but I still liked it. I like Lancaster but his westerns (with the exception of The Professionals) have rarely impressed me to much, but this is one of his better ones.

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5 minutes ago, Casey06 said:

I remember watching this during my big western phase a few years ago. I remember liking it. I agree that the ending is kinda disappointing but I still liked it. I like Lancaster but his westerns (with the exception of The Professionals) have rarely impressed me to much, but this is one of his better ones.

I just saw Lawman for the first time, and quite enjoyed it, though the ending left me a little flat. I was pleased that Robert Ryan had the opportunity to play a role with some complexity, his performance here reminding me of the depth he had brought to his character in The Wild Bunch two years before. I would agree that The Professionals is probably by favourite Lancaster western.

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The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog  (1927)  -  7/10

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Hitchcock's breakthrough hit, a thriller based on the book by Marie Belloc Lowndes. A mysterious killer known as "the Avenger" is terrorizing the streets of London. He targets women with blonde, curly hair, and the police are at a loss to stop him. Meanwhile, a sketchy new lodger (Ivor Novello) takes up residence in the rooming house of a landlady (Marie Ault) and her husband (Arthur Chesney). The landlady becomes convinced that the lodger is really the Avenger, which proves problematic as the lodger has caught the attention of the landlady's daughter, Daisy (June Tripp). Also featuring Malcolm Keen as Daisy's policeman boyfriend.

Inspired by the Jack the Ripper case, this was Hitchcock's first suspense picture, and was an immediate success, with one critic at the time even calling this the "best British film ever made". This is my second time watching it, and the first time watching the beautiful BFI restoration. The quality of the print is outstanding, and the commissioned score is excellent. Hitchcock uses a number of visually impressive double exposure shots, and I also liked the stylized intertitles. I still find the movie a tad too long, and Novello, who looks striking, is a silent-era-style ham, but it's still worth checking out for silent film fans. Arthur Chesney, playing the landlord, was the lookalike younger brother of Edmund Gwenn, and the former husband of Estelle Winwood.

Source: Criterion Blu-ray

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Here’s a few more movies I’ve watched recently.

The Circus(1928). Brilliant movie. Chaplin was the man! I honestly liked it more then The Gold Rush. It had all of the hallmarks of a great Chaplin film: humor, depth, and true emotion. Easily his most underrated film. 10/10.

Slap Shot(1977). What an odd movie. Funny for sure though. Paul Newman’s great of course. Story was all over the place but had some interesting themes at play. 8/10.

Do the Right Thing(1989). Powerful, entertaining, funny, thought provoking. That’s Do the Right Thing and it’s excellent. 9/10. 

Bride of Frankenstein(1935). Great sequel to the first film. While I prefer the first, this one was also great. It made me appreciate its director James Whale more then I had before. It’s campier and a bit to funny at times, but it’s a great time. 9/10.

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7 hours ago, Casey06 said:

 

Bride of Frankenstein(1935). Great sequel to the first film. While I prefer the first, this one was also great. It made me appreciate its director James Whale more then I had before. It’s campier and a bit to funny at times, but it’s a great time. 9/10.

I really enjoy both FRANKENSTEIN and BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN, that I constantly change my mind which one is better.

Did miss Baron Frankenstein in the sequel, though I understand the actor died a year or two earlier before BRIDE came out.

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