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5 minutes ago, sewhite2000 said:

Daffy: Let's try that again. Wabbit season.

Bugs: Wabbit season.

Daffy: DUCK SEASON! FIRE!

You know the rest ...

Edit: Oops, meant to put that in the quotable lines thread. Oh, well, it's still funny ...

eh, when you get right down to it, this quote is  fine any time in any thread.

#timeless

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The Ring  (1927)  -  6/10

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Sports melodrama about boxers Jack Sander (Carl Brisson) and Bob Corby (Ian Hunter) vying for the love of the same woman, Mabel (Lillian Hall-Davis). With Forrester Harvey, Harry Terry, and Gordon Harker. This forgettable British effort from writer-director Alfred Hitchcock has a few interesting shots, and it's odd seeing Hunter, a later frequently seen presence in many American features, playing a boxer. 

Source: Mill Creek DVD

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Downhill aka When Boys Leave Home  (1927)  -  6/10

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Hitchcock-directed melodrama with Ivor Novello as Roddy, a boarding school student accused of knocking up a waitress named Mabel (Annette Benson). Roddy's best friend is the actual culprit, but he takes the blame to save his friend from expulsion. Roddy ends up becoming an actor ("gasp!") and falling into even more ill-repute. Also featuring Ian Hunter, Robin Irvine, Isabel Jeans, Norman McKinnel, and Lilian Braithwaite. 

This was another BFI restoration, so it looks great, and I really liked the shot-on-location scenes, and the fashions of the day. The story is hokey and dated, but an interesting glimpse at English moral outrage. 

Source: Criterion Blu-ray, included as a bonus feature with The Lodger.

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It’s been FOREVER Since there was an entire day of programming on TCM that interested me, but today was one of those days.

God bless James Cagney, you know. If you went to a movie and he was in it, you were ALWAYS getting your nickel’s worth.

One of the best actors ever, one of the best screen personas ever, and when he first started out – pure sex on the screen. 

Lew Ayres’s dreadful performance in “doorway to hell” always turns me off to that film, but I really enjoyed and THE CROWD ROARS and– especially – WINNER TAKE ALL, A boxing drama he did with Virginia Bruce for Warner Bros. in 1932. The climax of the film has him running around a cruise ship in nothing but a pair of boxing trunks and gloves.

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9 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

God bless James Cagney, you know. If you were in a movie and that man was in it, you were getting your nickel’s worth.

One of the best actors ever, one of the best screen personas ever, and when he first started out – pure sex on the screen. 
Lew Agee’s’ dreadful performance in “doorway to hell” always turns me off to that film, but I really enjoyed and THE CROWD ROARS and– especially – WINNER TAKE ALL, A boxing drama he did with Virginia Bruce for Warner Bros. in 1932. The climax of the film has him running around a cruise ship in nothing but a pair of boxing trunks and gloves.

I so agree with you on Cagney, regardless of the movie's quality, his presence on screen always kept me glued to the screen.

 

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The Farmer's Wife  (1928)  -  6/10

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Hitchcock tries his hand at the rom-com with this British silent featuring Jameson Thomas as a farmer named Sweetland whose wife passes away. After a proper mourning period, Sweetland decides to try and get remarried, so he enlists the aid of his housekeeper Minta (Lillian Hall-Davis) in compiling a list of local eligible ladies. Featuring Gordon Harker, Gibb McLaughlin, Maud Gill, Louie Pounds, Olga Slade, and Ruth Maitland.

I liked this a bit more than the last time I watched it. Still, it displays little of Hitchcock's style, the story's destination is evident from the first few moments, and the end result certainly ranks as one of his lesser (least?) efforts. I did like the servant's name, played by Harker - "Churdles Ash".

Source: Mill Creek DVD

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Easy Virtue  (1928)  -  5/10

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Drama based on a Noel Coward play, directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Isabel Jeans stars as a woman with a scandalous past (divorce! accusations of adultery!) who meets a nice young man (Robin Irvine), only to have her happiness threatened by the revelations of her sordid secrets. With Franklin Dyall, Eric Bransby Williams, Violet Farebrother, Frank Elliott, Enid Stamp-Taylor, and Ian Hunter.

I've always considered this Hitchcock's worst, and that opinion hasn't changed with another re-watch. Dialogue-based stage plays tended to make for poor silent films, in my experience, unless the script and/or director found ways to open things up and translate the auditory to the purely visual. Hitchcock uses shadows, double exposure, and some expressive framing, but not enough interest is generated by the material. 

Source: Mill Creek DVD

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Champagne  (1928)  -  5/10

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Another Hitchcock rom-com, this time starring Betty Balfour (the "British Mary Pickford") as a spoiled rich girl whose father (Gordon Harker) claims that the family fortune has been lost in a stock market crash. Betty is forced to look for a job, as her persistent boyfriend (Jean Bradin) attempts to get her to marry him. Also featuring Ferdinand von Alten as "The Man".

This is nearly as bad as Easy Virtue, but some fancy camerawork makes it a tiny bit more memorable. Harker, making his third and final appearance in a Hitchcock film, isn't bad as the scheming father. 

Source: Mill Creek DVD

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The Manxman  (1929)  -  6/10

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Hitchcock's last full silent film was this melodrama about two friends, Pete (Carl Brisson, from The Ring) and Philip (Malcolm Keen, from The Lodger), who both pine for the same gal, Kate (Anny Ondra). Pete proposes to Kate, but her father disapproves of the union due to Pete's low financial prospects. Pete heads to Africa to make his fortune, and while he's away, Philip makes time with Kate, leading to trouble. Also featuring Randle Ayrton and Clare Greet.

There are some unusual touches that elevate this a bit above the dross, such as the unexpected ending. Ondra, a Polish singer and film actress, makes for a fetching lead, and Hitchcock used her again in his next film. 

Source: Mill Creek DVD

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Lawrence-thanks for watching these & taking the time to voice your opinion of them. I saw Hitchcock's early British films years ago in a film class and my opinion hasn't changed: One view curiosities for Hitch completists. 

Where do you get the stills you use in your posts? Marvelous!

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What a great desktop pic!

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Blackmail  (1929)  -  7/10

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Alfred Hitchcock's first talkie was this thriller with Anny Ondra as Alice White, an adventurous young woman who gets into a fight with her police detective boyfriend Frank Webber (John Longden), after which she heads to an artist's flat for some modeling. When the artist (Cyril Ritchard) takes liberties, Alice is forced to defend herself, with tragic consequences. A shady low-life crook (Donald Calthrop) sees Alice leave the artist's residence, and decides to blackmail the terrified girl. Also featuring Sara Allgood and Charles Paton as Alice's parents, Hannah Jones, and Harvey Braban.

Hitchcock filmed this in both talkie and silent versions (the silent is included as an extra on the DVD), but the talkie version had the longer lasting impact, becoming a huge hit across Europe, and ushering in the sound era in British filmmaking. Today the film is rather clunky and uneven, but there's some bravura sequences, such as the lethal encounter in the artist's apartment, and a climactic chase scene in and on a museum. The lovely Anny Ondra, of Polish descent and raised in Prague, had a thick Czech accent, and post-dub sound editing was not an option at this early stage of the technology. Instead, actress Joan Barry stood off camera and spoke all of Alice's dialogue while Anny Ondra lip-synched to it, a process that sounds tedious and troublesome. 

Source: KL Classics DVD

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Juno and the Paycock  (1930)  -  4/10

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After filming a few bits on the revue musical Elstree Calling, Alfred Hitchcock's next full feature directing job was on this terrible adaptation of Sean O'Casey's popular play. A long-suffering Irish family struggles to get by during the Irish Civil War. Matriarch "Juno" (Sara Allgood, who had played the role on the stage as well) tries to get layabout drunk husband Captain Boyle (Edward Chapman), whom she refers to as the "Paycock" (peacock) due to his strutting vanity, to find work to help support the family, which includes daughter Mary (Kathleen O'Regan), a worker on strike, and son Johnny (John Laurie), a former IRA fighter left bitter and resentful after an injury resulted in the loss of an arm. When the Captain learns that he's come into a generous inheritance, the family thinks that their fortunes may have finally brightened, only for tragedy to occur. Also featuring Marie O'Neill, Sidney Morgan, Dave Morris, and John Longden (the policeman boyfriend from Blackmail).

I'm not familiar with O'Casey's play, but if this film is an indication, it's awful. Hitchcock made the conscious decision to abstain from any cinematic style, and attempted to present this as a largely static filmed play, rendering the already-tedious proceedings even more unbearable. Allgood isn't bad, but the rest of the cast is forgettable at best. The original play had starred Barry Fitzgerald as the Captain, and he makes his film debut here as a speech-making rabble-rouser at the movie's start. Perhaps Hitchcock thought that Barry's Nosferatu-with-a-bad-wig look wasn't camera-friendly enough to reprise his lead role. I had given this a 5/10 when I first watched it several years ago, but I dropped it a point, making this my least favorite Hitchcock film.

Source: Mill Creek DVD

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OH SNAP!

Just discovered ROKU TV has all the old BATMAN TV EPISODES UNEDITED.

Just watched a couple KING TUTS and the one where THE PENGUIN BECOMES MAYOR OF GOTHAM CITY, which- to be honest- was never one of my favorite episodes but now feels like A MAYLES BROTHERS DOCUMENTARY given the present state of politics.

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To be fair, I probably would've voted for him. BUZZ MEREDITH is magic in the part.

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Strangers on a Train (1951)

I thought I'd seen this before. Then I saw it in the theater on Wednesday. And now I'm not convinced that I had seen the film before. 

I would have remembered the ending. And I didn't remember it at all. So for all intents and purposes, I am considering this a first watch.

In this film, Farley Granger plays Guy Haines, a highly ranked tennis player who is on his way to NYC (traveling via train) for a tennis tournament. However, he is first planning on stopping in Metcalf, a town which I surmised must be near Washington DC, to see his estranged wife Miriam (Mrs. Tate #2 from "Bewitched"). While on the train, Guy is recognized by Bruno Antony (Robert Walker), a nutcase who listens to Guy's grievances about his estranged wife, Miriam. Miriam it seems, is a bit of a floozy. Bruno shares his problems with his father to Guy. 

Then, Bruno tells Guy about the perfect murder he concocted--two strangers would meet and swap murders. Each stranger would kill the other's target. This would confuse the investigation as neither stranger would have a motive for the killing, so they wouldn't be suspected. Bruno, seemingly serious about this plan, presses the issue with Guy. Guy, wanting to leave and get away from this weirdo, gives a half-hearted approval of the plan. Guy thinks the matter is over and done with. Bruno on the other hand, because he's bonkers, takes this as Guy's endorsement of the plan. He follows Guy to Metcalf to check out Miriam.

Guy meets Miriam at her work. It seems that Miriam demanded that Guy pay her a tidy sum in order for her to grant the divorce. Guy wants to marry his new girlfriend, Anne Morton (Ruth Roman), the daughter of a US Senator (Leo G. Carroll aka the minister from "The Parent Trap"). After paying Miriam the money, she reneges on her deal and informs Guy that she has no plans to grant him the divorce. She's also pregnant with her lover's baby and threatens to blackmail Guy by saying that her baby is his so that he can't divorce her. Justifiably upset, Guy leaves.

Later that evening, Bruno waits for Miriam to leave her home. He follows her and her two male friends to a local amusement park. Miriam keeps seeing Bruno watching her, but apparently thinks that he's interested in her romantically as she smiles at him. She should be weirded out by how he's staring at her, but apparently isn't. Miriam and her friends take a boat to an island in the amusement park. Bruno follows after. Miriam makes the grave mistake of staying behind when her friends decide to explore the island. Bruno strangles Miriam to death.

The next day, Bruno tells Guy that he's held up his end of their deal by killing Miriam, and now it's Guy's turn to kill Bruno's father. Guy is horrified and announces that he has no intention of killing anyone. He tries hiding out at his girlfriend's home in Washington, but Bruno shows up and insinuates himself into Guy's personal life. Guy is also a suspect in Miriam's murder investigation, as he's the only person in her life who would have a motive. 

The remainder of the film deals with Guy trying to escape Bruno and Bruno's increasingly aggressive maneuvers to stay in Guy's life. Guy, Anne, and Anne's sister Barbara (Alfred's daughter Patricia Hitchcock), team up to try and exonerate Guy as a suspect. Anne and Barbara, after observing some of Bruno's odd behavior, begin to suspect that he had something to do with Miriam's death. 

The highlight of the film is by far the climactic carousel scene at the end of the film. I will not even try to describe it as I couldn't do it justice. 

Hitchcock's MacGuffin is Guy's lighter that is highlighted throughout the film. Watch for Hitchcock boarding a train carrying a double bass.

This was an excellent film and may now rank in my top 5 Hitchcock films ever made. This film definitely deserves to be mentioned alongside other Hitchcock classics like "Rear Window" and "Psycho."

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

Strangers on a Train (1951)

In this film, Farley Granger plays Guy Haines, a highly ranked tennis player who is on his way to NYC (traveling via train) for a tennis tournament. However, he is first planning on stopping in Metcalf, a town which I surmised must be near Washington DC, to see his estranged wife Miriam (Mrs. Tate #2 from "Bewitched").

STRANGERS ON A TRAIN also features Marion Lorne (Aunt Clara from BEWITCHED) as Bruno's mother. I love the scenes with Bruno and his mother.

The first time I saw the movie I didn't realize that Kasey Rogers (Louise Tate #2) played Miriam. I think it was combination of the glasses she wore and the fact that she was credited as Laura Elliott. 

Also,  I thought it was unusual for her character to be wearing glasses. Of course, eventually I learned that the glasses were an important plot point.   

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2 minutes ago, HoldenIsHere said:

STRANGERS ON A TRAIN also features Marion Lorne (Aunt Clara from BEWITCHED) as Bruno's mother. I love the scenes with Bruno and his mother.

The first time I saw the movie I didn't realize that Kasey Rogers (Louise Tate #2) played Miriam. I think it was combination of the glasses she wore and the fact that she was credited as Laura Elliott. 

Also,  I thought it was usual for her character to be wearing glasses. Of course, eventually I learned that the glasses were an important plot point.   

Yes. I forgot about Aunt Clara.  She even played the same type of character, save for the mixed up spells that Samantha cannot reverse.

I didn't realize it was Mrs Tate #2 until I looked her up on imdb. At first I thought it was Patricia Hitchcock until she shows up later, and I'm like "no wait, that's Patricia Hitchcock." Normally in Hitch's films, Patricia has a small-ish role. I liked that she had a fairly important role in this movie.  She was very funny with her true crime theories.  

Robert Walker was such a creep in this movie. I hadn't seen him in this type of role before.  Aesthetically, he reminds me of a cross between John Garfield and Wilbur from Mr. Ed. It's a shame that he passed away so shortly after 'Strangers.' I also thought he was great in The Clock with Judy Garland.  

I don't wear glasses and I was coveting Mrs. Tate's cat-eyed glasses.

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4 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Yes. I forgot about Aunt Clara.  She even played the same type of character, save for the mixed up spells that Samantha cannot reverse.

I didn't realize it was Mrs Tate #2 until I looked her up on imdb. At first I thought it was Patricia Hitchcock until she shows up later, and I'm like "no wait, that's Patricia Hitchcock." Normally in Hitch's films, Patricia has a small-ish role. I liked that she had a fairly important role in this movie.  She was very funny with her true crime theories.  

Robert Walker was such a creep in this movie. I hadn't seen him in this type of role before.  Aesthetically, he reminds me of a cross between John Garfield and Wilbur from Mr. Ed. It's a shame that he passed away so shortly after 'Strangers.' I also thought he was great in The Clock with Judy Garland.  

I don't wear glasses and I was coveting Mrs. Tate's cat-eyed glasses.

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Her glasses from this 1951 movie are stylish today.

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(SPOILERS ALERT):

The "Is your name Marion?" innocent-sounding question Bruno asks then he strangles her while we watch through the lenses of her glasses that have fallen into the ground is quite chilling.

Robert Walker did make quite the chilling villain in here. It just goes to show it's the seemingly 'boy-next-door' type that you have to watch out for.

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Murder!  (1930)  -  6/10

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Hitchcock tries a mystery with uneven results. Actress Diana (Norah Baring) is accused of murder, having been found dazed in the room where the murder occurred, near the murder weapon. She's found guilty at trial and sentenced to death. One of the jurors is famous stage actor Sir John Menier (Herbert Marshall), who was brow-beaten into voting for a guilty verdict. He feels shame for allowing himself to be swayed on such a matter, so he decides to find the actual culprit and clear Diana's name before her execution date. Also featuring Edward Chapman, Phyllis Konstam, Miles Mander, Esme Percy, Donald Calthrop, and Una O'Connor.

This is a strange movie. Perhaps the courts work differently in the UK, but having Menier serve on Diana's jury, when he had a prior professional mentorship with the young woman, seems like dubious jurisprudence. And Menier's plan to expose the real murderer, which involves staging a new play, seems overly ambitious at best, pure silliness at worst. The sound is a bit dodgy in places, but some of that comes from the fact that the technology at the time restricted post-dubbing, so Hitchcock had a full orchestra on set and off camera, performing the score while the actors read their lines for the scene. Esme Percy, making his film debut, plays an actor who specializes in playing women's roles, resulting in some unusual scenes. Among the returning Hitchcock performers are Chapman (from Juno and the Paycock), Mander (The Pleasure Garden), and Calthrop (Blackmail). 

Source: KL Studio Classics DVD

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54 minutes ago, HoldenIsHere said:

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Her glasses from this 1951 movie are stylish today.

I have some cat eye sunglasses and some 60s-ish looking sunglasses. They're pretty sweet.  I do have reading glasses, maybe I should use my VSP and get some cat eyed ones--maybe then I'd actually wear them. Lol. 

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52 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

(SPOILERS ALERT):

The "Is your name Marion?" innocent-sounding question Bruno asks then he strangles her while we watch through the lenses of her glasses that have fallen into the ground is quite chilling.

Robert Walker did make quite the chilling villain in here. It just goes to show it's the seemingly 'boy-next-door' type that you have to watch out for.

Yes. When he asks Miriam her name was very creepy.  Another creepy moment is when he looks up at Barbara as he was pretend choking the party guest (aka Mrs. Benson from an episode of I Love Lucy. Mrs. Benson is the former owner of Lucy and Ricky's 2-bedroom apartment).  He starts choking the party guest for real as he stares at Barbara and goes into sort of a trance. 

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