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The Old Maid (1939)

I'm trying to watch all of my Queen, Bette Davis' films. I've seen a lot of them, and plan to re-watch, but I decided to start with Bette's films that are on my DVR. "The Old Maid" was the other Bette Davis/Miriam Hopkins film that I hadn't seen. Their feud on this film was notorious and paved the way for the two ladies to work together on another film (the one I have seen), "Old Acquaintance."

In this film, Davis and Hopkins play cousins, Charlotte and Delia, respectively. The story starts just before the Civil War breaks out. At the beginning of the film, Charlotte is seen helping Delia get ready for her wedding day. After finding her "something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue," Delia is ready to walk down the aisle. However, she receives a telegram from her old beau, Clem (George Brent), who is returning after two years away. It seems that Clem and Delia were deeply in love, and Delia wanted to marry. Clem it seems left to earn some money so that he could marry Delia. Delia couldn't wait two years and managed to get herself hitched to the son of one of the wealthiest families in town--the Ralstons.

Delia doesn't particularly love her beau, Jim Ralston, but does love the wealth and status that he would bring to their marriage. By marrying Jim, Delia could ascend into an upper echelon of society that up until now, she would have never even dreamed of achieving. Charlotte is against the marriage, as she is more of the idea that you marry for love, not for security. Delia wants to ignore Clem's telegram, but Charlotte thinks that blowing him off would be cruel. She decides to meet him at the train station herself, and break the bad news.

Clem is understandably upset, but not that upset as it seems that Charlotte is also crushing on him. After Delia's wedding, Charlotte spends time with Clem. He informs her that he's enlisting in the Union Army to fight in the war. They say their goodbyes.

A few years pass, now post-Civil War, and now we see Charlotte in Philadelphia, running an orphanage for "Foundlings." "Foundlings," as I learned is a term used for children who are abandoned by their parents and taken in by strangers. One of the foundlings, Tina, seems particularly close to Charlotte. Family friend, Dr. Lanskell (Donald Crisp), also interacts with Tina in a way that implies he knows something about Charlotte and Tina that the audience does not. Charlotte is also engaged to Delia's brother-in-law, Joe Ralston. However, unlike Delia, Charlotte is deeply in love with Joe and is not concerned about his wealth and status in society.

Then we learn the real scoop on Charlotte and Tina. It seems that Clem was killed in action during the war. "Clementina 'Tina' Lovell," was his and Charlotte's baby. It seems that their last rendezvous together was a little more intimate that was let on at the beginning of the film. Ashamed of her baby's illegitimacy, Charlotte opened the orphanage as a means to hide her daughter's true origin. Obviously, Dr. Lanskell was privy to that information as well (I could possibly presume that he may have delivered Tina). 

As Tina grows up, Charlotte struggles throughout the film-- does she tell Tina the truth? Or keep it a secret and lose the only child she'll ever have? 

This was a fantastic film. Both Bette Davis and Miriam Hopkins did an amazing job in their respective parts. I thought that adult Tina over-did it a bit with her adulation for Delia, I was like "come on already. We get it. You like her more than Charlotte." I also wish that Charlotte hadn't let herself go so badly, but I suppose that was meant to play up how much she tried to remain in the background and not disrupt Tina's life with Delia. 

I also liked how they didn't make Delia a clear-cut villain. While she does a lot of crappy things to Charlotte, I think deep down, she legitimately wanted to share her wealth and status with her cousin and her cousin's daughter. Her initial motives may have been bad, but I think ultimately, she had good intentions.

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The Skin Game  (1931)  -  6/10

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Alfred Hitchcock directs this adaptation of John Galsworthy's play. The moneyed, cultured Hillcrists battle against the nouveau riche Hornblowers, the latter headed by the ambitious, combative patriarch (Edmund Gwenn). Their squabbles over the use of farm land for industrial purposes ends up causing heartache and tragedy for both families. Featuring C.V. France, Helen Haye, and Jill Esmond as the Hillcrists, and John Longden, Phyllis Konstam, and Frank Lawton as the other Hornblowers. With Herbert Ross, Dora Gregory, and Edward Chapman.

This had already been filmed (also with Gwenn) in 1921. The class-conscious storyline resonated well with the British, I suppose. Gwenn plays his role big, and is a stark contrast to his later, best-known Kris Kringle role in Miracle on 34th Street. Esmond, the first wife of Laurence Olivier and originally the bigger star in the marriage, has one of her better film roles. As for Hitchcock's direction, the only stand-out scene is a lengthy auction with a lot of rapid-cut edits.

Source: Mill Creek DVD

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4 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Strangers on a Train (1951)

A plot that's reused for the hilarious Throw Momma From the Train, and scenes of Robert Walker that are reused in the hilariously bad My Son John because Walker had the nerve to die before completing his scenes in that movie.

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Rich and Strange aka East of Shanghai  (1931)  -  5/10

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Another of Hitchcock's lesser efforts, this romantic drama concerns Fred (Henry Kendall) and Emily Hill (Joan Barry), a married couple of limited means whose marriage has turned dull. When they come into a great deal of money, they decide to travel, with hopes of rekindling their romance, only to run into even more marital discord. With Percy Marmont, Betty Amann, and Elsie Randolph.

Hitchcock later said that he learned a few cinematic techniques on this, such as how to film in a water tank, but his learning experience doesn't make for much of a film for audiences today. It resembles the kind of thing then popular on both sides of the Atlantic - people living in luxury while experiencing romantic tumult. It was done better by others. Joan Barry provided the off-screen "live dubbing" for Anny Ondra in Blackmail two years earlier.

Source: Mill Creek DVD

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3 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Rich and Strange aka East of Shanghai  (1931)  -  5/10

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It's an odd ball little film, I know, and not the kind of subject matter you expect with Hitchcock, but I find Rich and Strange rather entertaining. The film takes a bit of turn for the unexpected in its final chapters and I tend to be drawn to films set in the Orient.

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19 minutes ago, TomJH said:

It's an odd ball little film, I know, and not the kind of subject matter you expect with Hitchcock, but I find Rich and Strange rather entertaining. The film takes a bit of turn for the unexpected in its final chapters and I tend to be drawn to films set in the Orient.

I bet you loved the "surprise dinner" scene on the Chinese junk, didn't you? 🤢

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Number 17  (1932)  -  5/10

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Brief Hitchcock crime thriller based on a play by J. Jefferson Farjeon. A detective (John Stuart) enters an empty house at the title street number. He stumbles upon a gang of jewel thieves attempting to retrieve some loot that they stashed at the house after a recent heist. With the aide of next-door neighbor Nora (Anne Grey), the detective hopes to foil the gang. With top-billed Leon M. Lion as a goofy crook sporting an unfortunate haircut, Donald Calthrop, Barry Jones, Ann Casson, Henry Caine, and Garry Marsh.

Hitchcock later admitted that this film was a mess, with a jumbled, murky narrative and unbelievable characters. There's a lot of miniature work though, for fans of the technique, and an exciting train finale. And the movie's only 66 minutes long.

Source: Mill Creek DVD

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As you may have noticed, I'm re-watching the films of Alfred Hitchcock. Next up should be 1934's Waltzes from Vienna, starring Esmond Knight and Edmund Gwenn as Johann Strauss Junior and Senior, respectively. However, I watched this recently enough, and it's not something I'm keen to revisit, at least not at this time.  6/10

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17 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Just discovered ROKU TV has all the old BATMAN TV EPISODES UNEDITED.

Yay! A chance for me to see the Eartha Kitt episodes! Thanks!

15 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Robert Walker was such a creep in this movie. I hadn't seen him in this type of role before.  Aesthetically, he reminds me of a cross between John Garfield and Wilbur from Mr. Ed. It's a shame that he passed away so shortly after 'Strangers.' I also thought he was great in The Clock with Judy Garland.  

I agree. I love that Walker gets a chance to really show his talent. I understand comics often make chilling villains in movies, they have a certain intensity. I tire quickly of Robt Walker's golly gee character in a film, it must have been maddening for him to do as a handsome adult man.

Check out Robert Walker Jr who looks & sounds exactly like his dad in Star Trek episode "Charlie X" He has his dad's acting intensity too:

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I too have a collection of vintage cat's eye glasses and had some fitted with my prescription. They are beautifully made, but very heavy lucite. 

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The Man Who Knew Too Much  (1934)  -  8/10

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Hitchcock's first film take on this tale of a family that becomes entangled with a spy ring. Bob (Leslie Banks) and Jill Lawrence (Edna Best), along with teen daughter Betty (Nova Pilbeam), vacations in the Swiss Alps where they learn of an assassination plot masterminded by the bizarre Abbott (Peter Lorre). The gang kidnaps Betty to ensure the silence of the Lawrences until the assassination, set to take place in London at the Royal Albert Hall, but Bob and Jill try to rescue their daughter first. Also featuring Hugh Wakefield, Frank Vosper, Cicely Oates, and Pierre Fresnay.

I like this more every time I see it. Peter Lorre, in his English-language debut, makes for one of Hitchcock's most entertaining villains. It's remarkable that Lorre delivered his lines phonetically, not yet being proficient in English. I also liked Cicely Oates as Lorre's coldly efficient "nurse". The film's finale, a protracted shoot-out between the gang and the police, is well done, shockingly violent for the time, and full of little visual gags. There's also a harrowing trip to the dentist, the big Albert Hall concert scene, a quick turn by French star Pierre Fresnay as Lawrence family friend, and a dachshund. This film is inevitably compared to the 1956 remake, and I've always liked this original take more, but I'm looking forward to re-watching the later version to compare them once more.

Source: Criterion DVD. Bonus features include audio commentary by film historian Philip Kemp, an interview with director and Hitchcock biographer Guillermo Del Toro, some of the audio interviews with Hitchcock conducted by Francois Truffaut, and The Illustrated Hitchcock, a 1972 TV interview with Hitchcock. There's also a booklet with a lengthy essay on the film by critic Farran Smith Nehme.

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I have to admit I like the original THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH much more than the 1956 James Stewart/Doris Day version.

One of the many attractions of the earlier version, is, as you pointed out, Peter Lorre's performance as the villain.

Not that the 1956 remake was bad by any means, but Lorre is a hard act to follow when it comes to playing this kind of role.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

The Man Who Knew Too Much  (1934)  -  8/10

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Lorre, as you indicated, Lawrence, is terrific in this film. His career was on hold at the time after he fled Germany to Paris, and Hitchcock's choice of casting him in this film was a God send for the actor, eventually leading him to better opportunities in Hollywood.

I enjoy both versions that Hitchcock did of this story, the first very British, while the later one was slick American with "all American" stars, and a more padded out Albert Hall climax.

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6 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Check out Robert Walker Jr who looks & sounds exactly like his dad in Star Trek episode "Charlie X" He has his dad's acting intensity too:

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Robert Walker Jr. (whose mother was Jennifer Jones) also appears in Faye Dunaway's first movie THE HAPPENING (released the same year as BONNIE AND CLYDE).

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The 39 Steps  (1935)  -  8/10

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Hitchcock's famous "man-on-the-run" thriller, with Robert Donat as a Canadian ex-pat living in London who gets accused of murder. He goes on the run, avoiding the authorities in hopes of clearing his name, with the trail leading to the Scottish countryside. He eventually ends up involving a reluctant Madeleine Carroll. With Lucie Mannheim, Godfrey Tearle, Helen Haye, Wylie Watson, John Laurie, and Peggy Ashcroft.

Highlights for me: the Scottish Highlands, Madeleine Carroll removing her stockings while handcuffed to Donat, and Peggy Ashcroft's brief turn as the unhappy wife of a country farmer. Donat's easy charm and affable demeanor foretell the similar performances by Stewart and Grant in Hitchcock's later thrillers. There are some glaring plot-holes (why don't the villains deal with Donat when they off the woman in his apartment at the film's start?), but they can be ignored thanks to the pace of the proceedings.

Source: Criterion DVD. Bonus features include commentary by Hitchcock expert Marian Keane; a "visual essay" by Hitchcock expert (how many are there?) Leonard Leff; Hitchcock: The Early Years (2000), a short British documentary; excerpts from a 1966 British TV interview; more audio-only excerpts of Truffaut's Hitchcock interviews; a booklet/essay from critic David Cairns; and the complete Lux Radio Theatre adaptation, with Ida Lupino and Robert Montgomery.

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Secret Agent  (1936)  -  7/10

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Hitchcock adapts Campbell Dixon's play, itself based on W. Somerset Maugham's novel Ashenden. In 1916, British Army officer Edgar Brodie (John Gielgud) is conscripted into the intelligence bureau. He's given the name "Ashenden" and assigned to assassinate an unknown enemy agent. Ashenden is given a "wife" (Madeleine Carroll) as part of his cover, as well as the assistance of an oddball professional killer known as "the General" (Peter Lorre). While Ashenden and the General hunt for the enemy agent's identity, the "wife" makes time with American playboy Robert Marvin (Robert Young). With Percy Marmont, Florence Kahn, Charles Carson, and Lilli Palmer.

It's interesting to see Gielgud in a leading role, although it's quickly evident why it didn't happen more often. He lacks any romantic chemistry with Carroll, and he frequently seems bored by the proceedings. Carroll and Young both do well with under-thought characters, but Lorre easily steals the picture as the strange assassin with a morbid sense of humor and indeterminate ethnicity. 

Source: Mill Creek DVD 

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Sabotage  (1936)  -  7/10

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Hitchcock's adaptation of Joseph Conrad's The Secret Agent, with Sylvia Sidney as the American-born wife of foreigner Oscar Homolka. They live in London, where a series of bombings is terrorizing the city. She begins to suspect that her husband is the culprit, while an undercover detective (John Loder) lends a sympathetic ear. With Desmond Tester, Joyce Barbour, Matthew Boulton, S.J. Warmington, and William Dewhurst.

I enjoyed this movie a lot when I was younger and less familiar with classic films, but it's not as impressive these days. I still think Sidney and Homolka turn in good performances, and some sequences are suspenseful, but it lacks flair and any really outstanding moments. I prefer the later, more faithful adaptation of the novel, from 1996 and featuring Patricia Arquette, Gerard Depardieu, Bob Hoskins, Christian Bale, Jim Broadbent, Eddie Izzard, and Robin Williams.

Source: Alpha Video DVD, a very poor quality print to be avoided at all costs.

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Secret Agent  (1936)  -  7/10

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I'm rather fond of Secret Agent, though it's a shame that Robert Donat couldn't appear in this film, as were the original plans, for a reunion with Hitchcock and Madeleine Carroll. Robert Young shows the charm sorely lacking in sexless leading man John Gielgud. Peter Lorre steals all his scenes but Carroll is a great Hitchcock leading lady in this film, her final one before she crossed the Atlantic to greater fame in Hollywood.

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Young and Innocent  (1937)  -  7/10

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Another wrongfully-accused-man-on-the-run tale from Hitchcock, this time starring Derrick De Marney as a singer accused of murder. He escapes custody with hopes of clearing his name, and gets some unexpected help from Erica (Nova Pilbeam), the daughter of a police inspector. With Percy Marmont, John Longden, Edward Rigby, Mary Clare, Basil Radford, George Curzon, George Merritt, Bill Shine, and Torin Thatcher.

This was becoming well-trod territory for Hitchcock even back in '37, and De Marney & Pilbeam don't quite have the screen charisma of Donat & Carroll, but this is still enjoyable if one keeps their expectations in check. There's some miniature work featuring some trains and cars, and suspenseful mine collapse. The finale, with a band in blackface, may keep this one on the lesser-shown list. Pilbeam was 17 when this was filmed, while her romantic onscreen partner De Marney was 31.

Source: Mill Creek DVD

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The Lady Vanishes  (1938)  -  9/10

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Hitchcock's mystery/thriller lark, based loosely on a story by Edna Lina White. A young Englishwoman named Iris (Margaret Lockwood) is on a train, headed out of a (fictional) European country on her way back home to be married. She meets a kindly old woman (Dame May Whitty), but when the lady vanishes, nobody believes Iris. It's up to musicologist Gilbert (Michael Redgrave) to help Iris find the woman, if she really does exist. With Paul Lukas, Naunton Wayne, Basil Radford, Cecil Parker, Linden Travers, Mary Clare, and Googie Withers.

The balance of comedy to mystery to action is perfectly weighed, resulting in Hitchcock's finest film to date. The young Lockwood is winsome and charming, while Redgrave acquits himself much better than his stage cohort John Gielgud had a couple years earlier, although Redgrave and Hitchcock reportedly did not get along at all. Funny, intriguing, quickly paced and a brief 96 minutes, this was Hitchcock's high water mark.

Source: Criterion Blu-ray. Bonus features include a commentary track from film historian Bruce Eder; another "video essay" from Leonard Leff; more audio-only excerpts from Truffaut's Hitchcock interviews; and a booklet with an essay by critics Geoffrey O'Brien & Charles Barr. Also included is another full feature film, 1941's Crook's Tour, featuring Naunton Wayne and Basil Radford reprising their cricket-loving characters from The Lady Vanishes.

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On 11/8/2019 at 2:38 PM, speedracer5 said:

Strangers on a Train (1951)

I thought I'd seen this before. Then I saw it in the theater on Wednesday. And now I'm not convinced that I had seen the film before. 

I would have remembered the ending. And I didn't remember it at all. So for all intents and purposes, I am considering this a first watch.

In this film, Farley Granger plays Guy Haines, a highly ranked tennis player who is on his way to NYC (traveling via train) for a tennis tournament. However, he is first planning on stopping in Metcalf, a town which I surmised must be near Washington DC, to see his estranged wife Miriam (Mrs. Tate #2 from "Bewitched"). While on the train, Guy is recognized by Bruno Antony (Robert Walker), a nutcase who listens to Guy's grievances about his estranged wife, Miriam. Miriam it seems, is a bit of a floozy. Bruno shares his problems with his father to Guy. 

Then, Bruno tells Guy about the perfect murder he concocted--two strangers would meet and swap murders. Each stranger would kill the other's target. This would confuse the investigation as neither stranger would have a motive for the killing, so they wouldn't be suspected. Bruno, seemingly serious about this plan, presses the issue with Guy. Guy, wanting to leave and get away from this weirdo, gives a half-hearted approval of the plan. Guy thinks the matter is over and done with. Bruno on the other hand, because he's bonkers, takes this as Guy's endorsement of the plan. He follows Guy to Metcalf to check out Miriam.

Guy meets Miriam at her work. It seems that Miriam demanded that Guy pay her a tidy sum in order for her to grant the divorce. Guy wants to marry his new girlfriend, Anne Morton (Ruth Roman), the daughter of a US Senator (Leo G. Carroll aka the minister from "The Parent Trap"). After paying Miriam the money, she reneges on her deal and informs Guy that she has no plans to grant him the divorce. She's also pregnant with her lover's baby and threatens to blackmail Guy by saying that her baby is his so that he can't divorce her. Justifiably upset, Guy leaves.

Later that evening, Bruno waits for Miriam to leave her home. He follows her and her two male friends to a local amusement park. Miriam keeps seeing Bruno watching her, but apparently thinks that he's interested in her romantically as she smiles at him. She should be weirded out by how he's staring at her, but apparently isn't. Miriam and her friends take a boat to an island in the amusement park. Bruno follows after. Miriam makes the grave mistake of staying behind when her friends decide to explore the island. Bruno strangles Miriam to death.

The next day, Bruno tells Guy that he's held up his end of their deal by killing Miriam, and now it's Guy's turn to kill Bruno's father. Guy is horrified and announces that he has no intention of killing anyone. He tries hiding out at his girlfriend's home in Washington, but Bruno shows up and insinuates himself into Guy's personal life. Guy is also a suspect in Miriam's murder investigation, as he's the only person in her life who would have a motive. 

The remainder of the film deals with Guy trying to escape Bruno and Bruno's increasingly aggressive maneuvers to stay in Guy's life. Guy, Anne, and Anne's sister Barbara (Alfred's daughter Patricia Hitchcock), team up to try and exonerate Guy as a suspect. Anne and Barbara, after observing some of Bruno's odd behavior, begin to suspect that he had something to do with Miriam's death. 

The highlight of the film is by far the climactic carousel scene at the end of the film. I will not even try to describe it as I couldn't do it justice. 

Hitchcock's MacGuffin is Guy's lighter that is highlighted throughout the film. Watch for Hitchcock boarding a train carrying a double bass.

This was an excellent film and may now rank in my top 5 Hitchcock films ever made. This film definitely deserves to be mentioned alongside other Hitchcock classics like "Rear Window" and "Psycho."

Wonderful movie! Robert Walker steals the show.

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This may not The be proper forum to post this, but I really wanted to share it with a lot of people. In the past few weeks I’ve bought all of these films. Let’s just say a combination of birthday with used media stores and gift cards makes for sweet cinematic bliss! Also I forgot to picture but I also got Alfred Hitchcock’s Rope and Suspicion.

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Seeing your copy up there of The Beatles' "A HARD DAY'S NIGHT" reminds me of the frustration of my not being able to locate MY old VHS copy of it, and also The Monkee's HEAD!  I KNOW I brought them with me when we moved, and I also recall watching them here, but where they got off to?  ARGHHH! :angry:  

Sepiatone

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On 11/6/2019 at 9:55 PM, TomJH said:

I just saw Lawman for the first time, and quite enjoyed it, though the ending left me a little flat. I was pleased that Robert Ryan had the opportunity to play a role with some complexity, his performance here reminding me of the depth he had brought to his character in The Wild Bunch two years before. I would agree that The Professionals is probably by favourite Lancaster western.

Besides The Professionals my favorite Lancaster Westerns are Lawman and Ulzana's Raid

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