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3 hours ago, Casey06 said:

This may not The be proper forum to post this, but I really wanted to share it with a lot of people. In the past few weeks I’ve bought all of these films. Let’s just say a combination of birthday with used media stores and gift cards makes for sweet cinematic bliss! Also I forgot to picture but I also got Alfred Hitchcock’s Rope and Suspicion.

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I keep meaning to pick up a copy of CREATURE FROM THE BLACK LAGOON one of these days....and RAN is on my list to amazon prime the next crappy weather day I get here in NC.

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On 11/8/2019 at 6:49 PM, speedracer5 said:

The Old Maid (1939)

I'm trying to watch all of my Queen, Bette Davis' films. I've seen a lot of them, and plan to re-watch, but I decided to start with Bette's films that are on my DVR. "The Old Maid" was the other Bette Davis/Miriam Hopkins film that I hadn't seen. Their feud on this film was notorious and paved the way for the two ladies to work together on another film (the one I have seen), "Old Acquaintance."

 

THE OLD MAID gets better every time I see it. There is something very special about the way 1930's films capture period adaptations.

I admit OLD ACQUAINTANCE has its moments, but I find a lot of it to be quite problematic- ESPECIALLY because they let JAMES CRAIG entirely off the hook for outright abandoning his family, which even for a 40's film is just a little too WTFesque for me.

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PS- I'm guessing since it's BETTE DAVIS'S STAR OF THE MONTH month, that they're gonna show that one she did in the 1950's where she plays the librarian who slaps a kid?

I'm usually good with titles, but the title of this alludes me at present...

pss- i caught part of it the last time it aired, she SLAPS THE HELL outta that kid FOR REAL. When it came to SLAPPING, BETTE was PURE STANISLAVSKY!

 

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Jamaica Inn  (1939)  -  6/10

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Hitchcock's last British film before moving to America was this uncredited adaptation of Daphne Du Maurier's novel. In 19th century Cornwall, refined young woman Mary Yellen (Maureen O'Hara) arrives to visit her aunt, only to find that she's married to the loutish Joss Merlyn (Leslie Banks), who runs a gang of cutthroats who cause shipwrecks on the nearby coast in order to loot their cargo. Joss is secretly in league with the vain, mentally-deranged local nobleman Sir Humphrey Pengallan (Charles Laughton), while an investigator (Robert Newton) has gone undercover into the gang in order to bring them all to justice. With Marie Ney, Horace Hodges, Basil Radford, Emlyn Williams, Wylie Watson, Mervyn Johns, and John Longden.

Laughton was also the producer on this, and he and Hitchcock butted heads on everything, with Laughton switching roles (he was originally set to play the part Banks ended up with) and then demanding multiple re-writes to enlarge his new role as the mad Sir Humphrey. I'm a fan of Laughton's, but here he's rather awful. O'Hara, who gets an "introducing" credit although she'd had a few minor bit roles before this, looks nice but doesn't have a lot to do but act scared or horrified. Hitchcock reportedly thought she was a terrible actress, but Laughton insisted that she be cast, and he took to America to appear with him in The Hunchback of Notre Dame next. As for Jamaica Inn, it's only highlight for me is the large cast of British character actors of the time.

Side note: In a bonus feature interview of Hitchcock on one of the Criterion discs, the director is quoted as saying, "I tell filmmakers to try and avoid filming four things: dogs, babies, motorboats, and Charlie Laughton." 

Source: Mill Creek DVD

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41 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Jamaica Inn  (1939)  -  6/10

220px-Original_movie_poster_for_the_film

 

Jamaica Inn is one of Hitchcock's more disappointing films, with Laughton at his worst. This actor could be magnificent (Hunchback of Notre Dame would be his next feature) but, if bored or working with a director he didn't respect, he could be a terrible ham. But I think you're a bit hard on Maureen O'Hara, Lawrence. Perhaps anybody would look good next to Laughton's over-the-top performance but I thought, considering her inexperience, that the actress wasn't half bad in this feature.

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9 minutes ago, TomJH said:

But I think you're a bit hard on Maureen O'Hara, Lawrence. Perhaps anybody would look good next to Laughton's over-the-top performance but I thought, considering her inexperience, that the actress wasn't half bad in this feature.

I think you may have misunderstood my comments on Maureen. I meant that she wasn't bad with what she was given to work with, which wasn't much. Hitchcock's comments about her being a terrible actress (based on her screen test) were his thoughts, not mine, and I don't agree with him (I generally like her), although I didn't see that screen test, so maybe she was awful in it.

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On 11/8/2019 at 3:49 PM, speedracer5 said:

The Old Maid (1939)

I always get this one mixed up with the other. Is this the one where Hopkins not only ches the scenery but half (if not all) the studio as well. In both films (the other being Old Acquaintance) Bette plays the serious one, the non-campy role, the model of common sense. She does this really well. Look at her in The Big Lie. I never knew she could be such a charmer as that. She proves that she can be not only Queen of Camp but also Queen of Sweet.

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36 minutes ago, laffite said:

I always get this one mixed up with the other. Is this the one where Hopkins not only ches the scenery but half (if not all) the studio as well. In both films (the other being Old Acquaintance) Bette plays the serious one, the non-campy role, the model of common sense. She does this really well. Look at her in The Big Lie. I never knew she could be such a charmer as that. She proves that she can be not only Queen of Camp but also Queen of Sweet.

Your description matches that of the other one.

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

I think you may have misunderstood my comments on Maureen. I meant that she wasn't bad with what she was given to work with, which wasn't much. Hitchcock's comments about her being a terrible actress (based on her screen test) were his thoughts, not mine, and I don't agree with him (I generally like her), although I didn't see that screen test, so maybe she was awful in it.

By your new avatar, Lawrence, I see that you're getting in the mood for your next Hitchcock.

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17 minutes ago, TomJH said:

By your new avatar, Lawrence, I see that you're getting in the mood for your next Hitchcock.

Her expression fits my typical mood. 

I finished Rebecca a while ago, I just didn't post about it. I liked it more this time, upping my rating for it to a 9/10. I was really impressed with Joan Fontaine this time, and I paid more attention to the sets, which are very good. I've always liked Judith Anderson as Mrs. Danvers, and felt she should have won the Oscar for it.

I watched the Criterion Blu-ray, which had a lot of bonus features that I waded through as well: a discussion on the movie's feminist themes, a making-of documentary, a documentary on Daphne Du Maurier, old episodes of the Tomorrow show with Joan Fontaine and Alfred Hitchcock as guests; screen tests with other actresses up for the lead role (including Vivien Leigh, Margaret Sullavan, Loretta Young, and Anne Baxter), etc. It was a deep dive into all things Rebecca, and was a bit exhausting. One of Criterion's more outstanding releases.

Next up: Foreign Correspondent

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2 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Her expression fits my typical mood. 

I finished Rebecca a while ago, I just didn't post about it. I liked it more this time, upping my rating for it to a 9/10. I was really impressed with Joan Fontaine this time, and I paid more attention to the sets, which are very good. I've always liked Judith Anderson as Mrs. Danvers, and felt she should have won the Oscar for it.

I watched the Criterion Blu-ray, which had a lot of bonus features that I watched: a discussion on the movie's feminist themes, a making-of documentary, a documentary on Daphne Du Maurier, old episodes of the Tomorrow show with Joan Fontaine and Alfred Hitchcock as guests; screen tests with other actresses up for the lead role (including Vivien Leigh, Margaret Sullavan, Loretta Young, and Anne Baxter), etc. It was a deep dive into all things Rebecca, and was a bit exhausting. One of Criterion's more outstanding releases.

Next up: Foreign Correspondent

If Mrs. Danvers' expression fits your mood, I just hope people keep you away from matches.

Yeh, Fontaine is very effective in the film, along with Anderson, of course. And George Sanders brings a jaunty, larcenous presence to the proceedings, as well. But this film feels more Du Maurier to me than it does Hitchcock (having said that, no, I haven't read the novel).

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10 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Her expression fits my typical mood. 

I finished Rebecca a while ago, I just didn't post about it. I liked it more this time, upping my rating for it to a 9/10. I was really impressed with Joan Fontaine this time, and I paid more attention to the sets, which are very good. I've always liked Judith Anderson as Mrs. Danvers, and felt she should have won the Oscar for it.

 

Out of all of Hitchcock's films, REBECCA is probably my favorite. Its mood and atmosphere has that mysterious, dark quality to it, but in a more subtle way than that was shown in his later films. And of course it does have fine performances from Laurence Olivier, Joan Fontaine, Judith Anderson and George Sanders in it.

Frankly I think Joan was more Oscar-worthy in here than she was for her winning performance  in SUSPICION the following year. I suspect her Oscar for that movie was as much a consolation prize for losing out for REBECCA just as James Stewart winning for THE PHILADELPHIA STORY was a makeup award for losing out for MR. SMITH GOES TO WASHINGTON  to Robert Donat in GOODBYE MR. CHIPS.

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7 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

PS- I'm guessing since it's BETTE DAVIS'S STAR OF THE MONTH month, that they're gonna show that one she did in the 1950's where she plays the librarian who slaps a kid?

I'm usually good with titles, but the title of this alludes me at present...

pss- i caught part of it the last time it aired, she SLAPS THE HELL outta that kid FOR REAL. When it came to SLAPPING, BETTE was PURE STANISLAVSKY!

 

Storm Center is the film, unfortunately it's not scheduled. I don't think TCM has shown this one in awhile. Wish TCM would show it.

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THE SMALL BACK ROOM AKA HOUR OF GLORY 1949 directed by Michael Powell powerful drama set in wartime England in 1943,David Farrar plays an explosive expert with a big alcool problem and fighting  the red tape in the military department,stellar cast with the usual great British actors:Jack Hawkins,R.Morley,C.Cusack,Leslie Banks,Michael Gough ,the beautiful Kathleen Byron and David Farrar are outstanding.I do not know if this film was shown on TCM before ,an excellent print 106 minutes 8.5/10

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1 hour ago, nakano said:

THE SMALL BACK ROOM AKA HOUR OF GLORY 1949 directed by Michael Powell powerful drama set in wartime England in 1943,David Farrar plays an explosive expert with a big alcool problem and fighting  the red tape in the military department,stellar cast with the usual great British actors:Jack Hawkins,R.Morley,C.Cusack,Leslie Banks,Michael Gough ,the beautiful Kathleen Byron and David Farrar are outstanding.I do not know if this film was shown on TCM before ,an excellent print 106 minutes 8.5/10

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Thank you for not saying too much about the story. Thank you for not saying "...that ends in tragedy?" or "...with horriific results" or "... that ends in murder" or some such thing that might be germane to this particular movie. Little spoilers like that are unnecessary but all to prevalent. What you said is perfect. Just an idea of the setting does fine.

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4 minutes ago, laffite said:

Thank you for not saying too much about the story. Thank you for not saying "...that ends in tragedy?" or "...with horriific results" or "... that ends in murder" or some such thing that might be germane to this particular movie. Little spoilers like that are unnecessary but all to prevalent. What you said is perfect. Just an idea of the setting does fine.

Yeah, yeah, yeah... message received. I won't post any more reviews. I know I've said as much before, but I make a solemn pledge this time - no more reviews.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Yeah, yeah, yeah... message received. I won't post any more reviews. I know I've said as much before, but I make a solemn pledge this time - no more reviews.

Lawrence, why would you allow me or anyone else to decide you? Yes, i admit it, I had you in mind. I'm just cross, that's all. Just a little pet peeve that got away from me. I apologize. Don't deprive others because of me. I'm probably in a foul mood and don't even realize it. You contribute mightily to these boards. Don't mind me, I'm not worth it.  No one person is in a case like this. Do press on with your reviews. One person ought not be reason enough to deter you. And that one person in this case has retracted, anyway. I hope you continue with your Hitchcock retrospective. Meantime I shall strive to overcome petty grievances. So must we all, if we (I) only could.

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10 hours ago, lavenderblue19 said:

Storm Center is the film, unfortunately it's not scheduled. I don't think TCM has shown this one in awhile. Wish TCM would show it.

Thank you!

I seem to recall the last time they showed it there was a little bit of a blowup on the message boards over it. I don’t recall exactly why.

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6 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Yeah, yeah, yeah... message received. I won't post any more reviews. I know I've said as much before, but I make a solemn pledge this time - no more reviews.

I hope you re-consider and keep the reviews coming, Larry. You write perceptively and do a great job. I was looking forward to your take on Foreign Correspondent, one of my favourite Hitchcocks.

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21 hours ago, Sepiatone said:

Seeing your copy up there of The Beatles' "A HARD DAY'S NIGHT" reminds me of the frustration of my not being able to locate MY old VHS copy of it, and also The Monkee's HEAD!  I KNOW I brought them with me when we moved, and I also recall watching them here, but where they got off to?  ARGHHH! :angry:   

Sepiatone

The Barnes & Noble 50% sale is going on right now through (until?) December 1 on Criterion films. Hard Day's Night is in the collection. If you have a B&N membership you can stack your 10% off on top of that (in store only). HDN is a film that lots of B&Ns carry. I picked up a Blu version of Cat People Saturday and what normally went for 40 bucks cost me 18 instead. I had the Cat People from the old Val Lewton set, but it was a DVD.

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There were only three branches of Barnes & Noble  nearby that I knew of, and they're all gone.  The only other places I knew of where old tapes and DVDs could be found for sale were thrift stores( which quit selling them) and video stores, which too are all gone. 

Sepiatone

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I look at this thread but don't read that many posts/reviews. If something catches my eye, I will look. I get a kick out of the titles LawrenceA comes up with. If those reviews stopped, who else would do it? I don't think anyone wants that! If they do ... tough darts! Mister A is very entertaining.

As for laffite, I'm very convinced no harm was meant. Life out here in California is very stressful this time of year.

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11 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Yeah, yeah, yeah... message received. I won't post any more reviews. I know I've said as much before, but I make a solemn pledge this time - no more reviews.

Your reviews are helpful, interesting and a joy to read. It will be a serious loss to this forum if you do not post more. Our tastes often coincide but your writing is such that I understand and appreciate your opinion and taste even when you are lauding total dreck. I urge you to set aside whatever incident prompted your statement and soon return to giving us your insights, sharing your experiences and disseminating your knowledge.

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ERA NOTTE A ROMA aka ESCAPE BY NIGHT 1960 by Roberto Rossellini little known film by Rossellini,3 allied war prisonners escaped and are hidden by a local couple in Rome just before Anzio in march 1944.approx 150 minutes Leo Genn,Renato Salvatori and Giovanna Ralli,good period film 7.75/10

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