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On 11/11/2019 at 1:38 AM, LawrenceA said:

Yeah, yeah, yeah... message received. I won't post any more reviews. I know I've said as much before, but I make a solemn pledge this time - no more reviews.

I was going to post a review of The Unsinkable Molly Brown, but mentioning that the Titanic hits an iceberg and she survives would have given away key plot points....

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Across The Pacific (1942)

The director and three stars of The Maltese Falcon reunited for an entertaining espionage tale with propaganda overtones. An officer cashiered from the U.S. Army is rejected for service in Canada then boards a Japanese steam ship bound for Panama. Aboard that ship he meets a doctor with Japanese connections who wants to hire him to gain U.S. military information, but not all is as it seems.

The primary pleasure for film buffs in viewing a film like this is to be found in the playing and interaction of its three lead players, that combined with the studio look that comes with a Warner Brothers film from this period. Humphrey Bogart is the cynical army man who collaborates with Sydney Greenstreet as the doctor with Japanese connections. Mary Astor plays a passenger on board the ship (on which much of the film is set) in whom Bogart becomes interested.

There is much enjoyable light hearted bantering between Bogart and Astor in the film's first half, assisted to no small degree by the potent chemistry between the two stars. Bogart kisses Astor for the first time on the ship whereupon she immediately starts to come down with a case of mal de mer. "Are you getting sick?" he asks her. "I don't know," she replies, "How do most women respond after you kiss them?" "They don't turn green," Bogie says. Bogart's name in this film, by the way, is Rick, just prior to playing another Rick in a far more famous film.

Greenstreet will bring his patented chatty joviality to his characterization, combined with a potent menace. Also to be seen in the film will be a pair of actors best known today for playing Charlie Chan's sons, Keye Luke, in a small part as a steamship clerk, and in a far more sizable role, Victor Sen Yung as a live wire Japanese American who likes to jive talk.

There will be a brief but exciting and atmospheric shootout in a theatre, as the story eventually evolves into a plot by Japanese agents to destroy the Gatun Locks. Will they succeed or will Bogie be able to stop them?

John Huston, who directed most of the film, was called away to go into the army as the film was nearing completion (with, apparently, no final chapter yet scripted). Vincent Sherman was then recruited to finish the production which he does in melodramatic but satisfactory style.

One of Bogart's more enjoyable films, even if no one has ever ranked it as a classic. By the way, there is no trip in this film across the Pacific. The title, I assume, refers to the menace pending from the Japanese Empire across those waters.

sjff_03_img1115.jpg

3 out of 4

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24 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Across The Pacific (1942)

The director and three stars of The Maltese Falcon reunited for an entertaining espionage tale with propaganda overtones. An officer cashiered from the U.S. Army is rejected for service in Canada then boards a Japanese steam ship bound for Panama. Aboard that ship he meets a doctor with Japanese connections who wants to hire him to gain U.S. military information, but not all is as it seems.

The primary pleasure for film buffs in viewing a film like this is to be found in the playing and interaction of its three lead players, that combined with the studio look that comes with a Warner Brothers film from this period. Humphrey Bogart is the cynical army man who collaborates with Sydney Greenstreet as the doctor with Japanese connections. Mary Astor plays a passenger on board the ship (on which much of the film is set) in whom Bogart becomes interested.

There is much enjoyable light hearted bantering between Bogart and Astor in the film's first half, assisted to no small degree by the potent chemistry between the two stars. Bogart kisses Astor for the first time on the ship whereupon she immediately starts to come down with a case of mal de mer. "Are you getting sick?" he asks her. "I don't know," she replies, "How do most women respond after you kiss them?" "They don't turn green," Bogie says. Bogart's name in this film, by the way, is Rick, just prior to playing another Rick in a far more famous film.

Greenstreet will bring his patented chatty joviality to his characterization, combined with a potent menace. Also to be seen in the film will be a pair of actors best known today for playing Charlie Chan's sons, Keye Luke, in a small part as a steamship clerk, and in a far more sizable role, Victor Sen Yung as a live wire Japanese American who likes to jive talk.

There will be a brief but exciting and atmospheric shootout in a theatre, as the story eventually evolves into a plot by Japanese agents to destroy the Gatun Locks. Will they succeed or will Bogie be able to stop them?

John Huston, who directed most the film, was called away to go into the army as the film was nearing completion (with, apparently, no final chapter yet scripted). Vincent Sherman was then recruited to finish the production which he does in melodramatic but satisfactory style.

One of Bogart's more enjoyable films, even if no one has ever ranked it as a classic. By the way, there is no trip in this film across the Pacific. The title, I assume, refers to the menace pending from the Japanese Empire across those waters.

sjff_03_img1115.jpg

3 out of 4

While it is not up to the classic status of CASABLANCA and THE MALTESE FALCON, I quite enjoyed this film.

I always enjoy the banter between Bogart and Sydney Greenstreet in ANY film. I too liked the sparring with Bogey and Mary Astor.

I agree with your assessment that the title refers to the what was going on with Japan at the time

 

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4 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

While it is not up to the classic status of CASABLANCA and THE MALTESE FALCON, I quite enjoyed this film.

I always enjoy the banter between Bogart and Sydney Greenstreet in ANY film. I too liked the sparring with Bogey and Mary Astor.

I agree with your assessment that the title refers to the what was going on with Japan at the time

 

Throughout the film, though, I kept thinking, "Where's Peter Lorre?"

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A KIND OF LOVING 1962 directed by John Schlesinger.Early Alan Bates film very good interesting story,a mature film quite different than Blue Denim, a great important early 60's film.8.5/10 Approx 113 min.I do not know if it was ever shown on TCM.

bates.jpg

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THE CRIMINAL 1960 directed by Joseph Losey AKA THE CONCRETE JUNGLE.In the UK,Stanley Baker is pulling a racetrack robbery.Very good cast Nigel Green,Patrick Magee,Sam Wanamaker etc Baker is excellent as usual,a stalwart leading man, good in every type of role approx 97 min.I  do not know if this film was ever shown on TCM 8/10

crininal.jpg

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FRENCH DRESSING 1964 directed by Ken Russell-his big screen debut,a little seaside village wants to be well known and decides to hold a film festival.Good comedy-satire with Marisa Mell,James Booth, Roy Kinnear among others.98 minutes 7.75/10 I do not know if this film was ever shown on TCM.

FRENCH.jpg

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5 hours ago, TomJH said:

Throughout the film, though, I kept thinking, "Where's Peter Lorre?"

They probably threw him overboard.

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Dark Victory Poster

Dark Victory (1939) TCM and a first time viewing for me. 8/10

Bette Davis is a dying socialite who falls in love with her doctor (George Brent). This is considered one of Davis' most iconic performances and I am sorry I waiting so long to see it, because I loved it. 

Davis just goes all out in a spellbinding performance. The film is a manipulative soap opera but is so highly entertaining that it just draws you in. I enjoyed the supporting cast which included Humphrey Bogart as a lovesick horse trainer (though he struggles with an Irish brogue) and Ronald Reagan as a tipsy rich chum. I also noticed that some clips turned up in one of my favorite films Midnight Cowboy. They are seen on a TV during the Jon Voight/Sylvia Miles sex scene. 

 

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"I think I'll have a large order of prognosis negative!" is one of those lines you wish you could somehow use in real life (referencing another thread.)

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3 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Bette Davis is a dying socialite who falls in love with her doctor (George Brent).

I wonder how deep in the film we are before we find out that she's ... dying. I hope near the beginning.

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33 minutes ago, laffite said:

I wonder how deep in the film we are before we find out that she's ... dying. I hope near the beginning.

About 30 minutes in. I hope you don't want me to stop posting reviews like Lawrence A!

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5 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Bette Davis is a dying socialite who falls in love with her doctor (George Brent). This is considered one of Davis' most iconic performances and I am sorry I waiting so long to see it, because I loved it. 

Like Roy, I love Davis' conniption fit when she learns what "prognosis negative" means. :lol:

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The Best of Everything (1959)

Valley of the Dolls meets the world of publishing in this mild look at the seamy side of the publishing industry (to be fair, it was 1959 so there was only so far they could go).  Hope Lange plays the new secretary who has hopes of becoming an editor; fellow secretary Diane Baker gets knocked up by a no-goodnik; and Suzy Parker will stop at nothing in her pursuit of Broadway director Louis Jourdan.

As for the bosses, there's Stephen Boyd who's bland by design as he's playing the "good cop" and Brian Aherne in a role of a sex-obsessed boss where you could see his character watching The Apartment a year later and saying to himself, "Why didn't I think of using an underling's apartment for my assignations.

And then there's Joan Crawford in the Susan Hayward role.  Crawford is fabulous in another of her strident later-career roles, playing a b!tch and a half who treats all of the secretaries like dirt, doing it to hide what an embittered woman she really is.

The Best of Everything is one of those movies that's not particularly great, but a hell of a lot of fun when it hits the inadvertent laughs.  Parker's downward spiral is probably the best in that regard.

7/10.

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The Best of Everything is a favorite of a number of posters, including me.  I agree with your assessment that it's great fun. I particularly like the ruination of Diane Baker and the glimpses of period New York City.

In fact, we ended up discussing it at some length recently, I think in the Blue Denim thread.  (Because Joan had filmed a promo for Blue Denim on The Best of Everything set.....)

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I just watched GARBO TALKS '84 starring Anne Bancroft, directed by Sidney Lumet.

397px-Garbo_talks_poster.jpg

A fantastic vehicle for Anne Bancroft, playing an extremely feisty lady living in NYC who simply doesn't take anyone's sheet-for example, when construction guys yell obscenities to passing women, she gets up on a lift and confronts the guys, "Ok, who here has the electric tongue? Is it plug in or batteries?" She is a Garbo freak, presumably enchanted by Garbo's independent nature, crying at her films playing on TV. 

Her suffering adult son Gilbert (Ron Silver) has to routinely bail her from jail, take daily humiliation at work and deal with his complaining wife, uncharacteristically played by cutie Carrie Fisher.

Add to that, Mom is diagnosed with inoperable brain tumor. Her dying wish is to meet Greta Garbo, whom we all know at the time lived in NYC. For anyone who remembers NYC in the 80's, it was a big deal to have a "Garbo Sighting" and better yet-a snap photo. (these days, she'd NEVER avoid a cel phone snap)

All this sets up the episodic story of Gilbert's goal to find Garbo. It was very cute, although the story flow was kind of uneven. Some "episodes" in his quest were funny, some poignant, some too long and others too short for my liking.

Overall, it was worth a view for the enjoyable performances, especially Bancroft who obviously had fun doing it. Catherine Hicks is also a standout, as a struggling actress working at the same dull accounting firm as Gilbert. Harvey Fierstein's segment was way too short, he's a powerhouse (as usual) in his vignette. 

The music however was the absolute worst. It's more dated, inappropriate and goofy than the music in TOOTSIE. Funny, when I looked at Leonard Maltin's book to find the year, his 2 sentence comment mentions the horrible soundtrack. NEVER UNDERESTIMATE the power of music in film!

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I'm so happy someone else has seen Garbo Talks.  I saw it originally, and still think of it as one of the small, lost gems of the 1980s.

In addition to Bancroft, as you note, I loved Carrie Fisher's bothered wife of Ron Silver, Lisa and her observations on making Chinese food and the annoyance of returning something at Bloomingdale's. 

About going into the savings account to live on,  Lisa yells "My father says that's like spitting on God!"

And the number of rather long monologues, particularly Steven Hill's are unusual.

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i had a long car ride to work this morning and the SIRIUS SATELLITE RADIO CLASSIC CHANNEL played a special hour long episode of THE LUXE RADIO SHOW wherein CLAUDETTE COLBERT, VERONICA LAKE, and PAULETTE GODDARD reprised their film roles in SO PROUDLY WE HAIL!

It's an especially good episode and really notable for an INCREDIBLE performance from VERONICA LAKE, which I cannot imagine was easy for her to give LIVE on air across the country and in front of a studio audience.

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"The Moon and Sixpence" from 1942.

I can't state how much I really enjoyed this movie.  In short--IT ROCKS!  George Sanders plays a stockbroker in London who abandons his family and heads to Paris to pursue his passion, which is painting.  The film is an adaptation of a Somerset Maugham story that's loosely based on the life of French impressionist, Paul Gauguin.  The story is told through the eyes of a journalist, Geoffrey Wolfe (played by Herbert Marshall), who hears of the artistic prowess of the man, Charles Strickland (played by Sanders) but hasn't been able to see any of his work to decide for himself whether or not the stockbroker turned artist is any good.  He's also pegged by Strickland's wife to travel to France to find out exactly why he suddenly left his comfortable life in England to live on the edge of a destitute life as a struggling artist. What Marshall does learn about Strickland is his brutal honesty in assessing the human condition as it pertains to love and relationships between men and women.  The story of Strickland's life is told in flashbacks as it follows him from London to Paris and ultimately, Tahiti.  Wolfe comes to appreciate Strickland's talent once he's finally able to see the man's work, but Strickland doesn't sell his paintings even though he sure could use the money.  Strickland seems to have a disdain for the pictures he creates; he doesn't think they're all that good and he can't understand why anyone would want them, let alone pay money to have one of his works.  And at the same time, he guards them jealously as his very own private world that no one else should be privy to view or experience.

It's a fascinating movie with outstanding performances from Sanders as well as Florence Bates in a supporting role toward the end of the film.  Steve Geray, whom I wasn't real familiar with until I started watching TCM, also gives a strong supporting performance in his role as Strickland's seemingly only friend in Paris.  Albert Basserman plays a doctor in Tahiti who treats Strickland when he falls ill, and a young Elena Verdugo plays Strickland's Tahitian wife.  The only thing I remember seeing Verdugo in was her turn as the secretary/office manager for Robert Young on "Marcus Welby, M.D." back in the 70's.  It is during this stage of his life that Strickland seems to mellow due to the calming influence of Ata (Verdugo's character) and her unpretentiousness that he seems to have never experienced with European women.  Sanders, who normally is cast in roles where he is well-groomed and sophisticated compared to other co-stars in his films, sure looks different here.  He starts off looking like you would expect George Sanders to look, but once he gets going in France, he sports a scruffy beard and disheveled hair for the rest of the film---and I think it's a great look on him.

About the only knock I can give to "The Moon and Sixpence" is the first 20-30 minutes of the picture is in need of restoration.  The faces of the actors and actresses are a bit fuzzy and washed out.  It gradually improves over the course of the film (at least, the copy I saw of it).  

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So I watched Becket(1964). This movie took me nearly 5 days to watch because of constant interruptions and prior commitments on my part. Was it worth it?! Not really no. I had a hard time staying with this movie. You can really tell it’s based on a play considering everything is just talking and talking. There have been many great movies based on plays other like A Streetcar Named Desire and Inherit the Wind, which have great writing, interesting characters and perfect staging, this film has none of those. Peter O’Toole saves this from being a complete disaster. He’s very believable as Henry II and you can’t take your eyes of of him. As usual, he was brilliant. Richard Burton was good, but I’ve seen him in Way batter roles like Whose Afraid of Virginia Woolf, another film based on a play. I guess the sets were nice and the costumes were pretty as well. But sadly I can’t say I enjoyed this one to much. Maybe I need to rewatch it in one sitting next time. 

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11 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I just watched GARBO TALKS '84 starring Anne Bancroft, directed by Sidney Lumet.

397px-Garbo_talks_poster.jpg

A fantastic vehicle for Anne Bancroft, playing an extremely feisty lady living in NYC who simply doesn't take anyone's sheet-for example, when construction guys yell obscenities to passing women, she gets up on a lift and confronts the guys, "Ok, who here has the electric tongue? Is it plug in or batteries?" She is a Garbo freak, presumably enchanted by Garbo's independent nature, crying at her films playing on TV. 

Her suffering adult son Gilbert (Ron Silver) has to routinely bail her from jail, take daily humiliation at work and deal with his complaining wife, uncharacteristically played by cutie Carrie Fisher.

Add to that, Mom is diagnosed with inoperable brain tumor. Her dying wish is to meet Greta Garbo, whom we all know at the time lived in NYC. For anyone who remembers NYC in the 80's, it was a big deal to have a "Garbo Sighting" and better yet-a snap photo. (these days, she'd NEVER avoid a cel phone snap)

All this sets up the episodic story of Gilbert's goal to find Garbo. It was very cute, although the story flow was kind of uneven. Some "episodes" in his quest were funny, some poignant, some too long and others too short for my liking.

Overall, it was worth a view for the enjoyable performances, especially Bancroft who obviously had fun doing it. Catherine Hicks is also a standout, as a struggling actress working at the same dull accounting firm as Gilbert. Harvey Fierstein's segment was way too short, he's a powerhouse (as usual) in his vignette. 

The music however was the absolute worst. It's more dated, inappropriate and goofy than the music in TOOTSIE. Funny, when I looked at Leonard Maltin's book to find the year, his 2 sentence comment mentions the horrible soundtrack. NEVER UNDERESTIMATE the power of music in film!

It's a sweet little film, and I do have a copy of it. Anne Bancroft's long monologue near the end is such a touching scene, and one of the best movie scenes in 1984. While she was up for a Golden Globe for it, she never really got her due for the film (or for that matter for To Be or Not to Be or 84 Charing Cross Road around the same time).

Regarding the music, I too remember Leonard Maltin's quip, but the only thing i thought about it was that it was "borrowed" for a TV movie with Angela Lansbury, The Shell Seekers (also seen on DVD), just a few years later. So it bred and multiplied.

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The Fountainhead (1949) --- AKA The Valley of the Dolls of its day......

So this is what you get when you mix together a great looking film, superior performances, a sweeping musical score.... and a completely cuckoo script! I had definitely heard of Ayn Rand before this film, but never knew really about what her controversial views were until this, and to put it this way, the film is bonkers. The whole idea that you must only look after your own interests without bothering to help anybody in your life time, that's demented. And much of the dialogue does not even sound like things normal people would ever say. So why am I still passing this film, largely because Gary Cooper and Patricia Neal are so good in this and because King Vidor directs with a steady hand.... but also in part for the unintentional hoots and hollers of laughter it brought me at times that reminded me of the later sections of Valley of the Dolls. It's a real hot mess of a film, but if you are in the mood for a rare example of deranged craziness in the classic era, it will work.

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