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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

If you have not already, I highly recommend reading the background information/trivia section for 14 HOURS on imdb or wikipedia.
 

The real life story that inspired it was, um, a little different.

In actuality, the whole episode lasted 11 hours, so in addition to changing the time frame, the producers went for a nicer ending as well.

Even though safety nets were put into place, John Warde, the jumper, avoided them during his plunge. He had been suffering from depression. Warde's boss, Patrick Valentine, later stated that Warde "wasn't quite crazy enough.  He was just too smart for us. We couldn't fool him. We offered to put into writing our promise that we wouldn't have him sent away to an asylum again, but he was rational enough to know that we didn't mean it. Obviously, we would have had to put him away after a exhibition like that."

Patrolman Charles Glasgow, who almost succeeded in getting Warde off the ledge, was despondent afterwards, saying "gee, I didn't think he'd do it. I thought we'd get him."

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I listened to THE GOBLINS WHO STOLE A SEXTON, an old BBC radio reading by SIR RALPH RICHARDSON With some outstanding musical accompaniment. The story is very obviously the prototype for the later, less grim A CHRISTMAS CAROL, But to be honest with you I think I prefer this version. It’s downright eerie and malevolent.

I recommend any of you who, like me, do not particularly care for the holiday season to give it a listen.BTW- a Sexton Is basically a fancy name for the caretaker/gravedigger at a Episcopal church. 

 

 

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I have finally got my DVR under 90% full! Woohoo! Thank goodness I own almost all the Bette Davis movies being shown today.

Bonnie and Clyde (1967)

I've had this movie on my DVR for like 2 years! I finally got around to watching this 60s classic.  I liked the film. I'm not sure if I'd need to watch it over and over, but I'm glad I saw it. I also loved the music.

I don't think "Bonnie and Clyde" needs much explanation plot-wise. It is based on the true story of infamous 1930s outlaws Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow.  During the Great Depression, Bonnie and Clyde terrorized small towns in the Midwest and the South by robbing banks and small mom and pop shops.  They killed multiple police officers and civilians.  

Bonnie and Clyde are played by Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty, respectively.  During filming, in the face of Beatty's reputation for going to bed with every woman he comes across, he and Dunaway agreed to keep their relationship platonic.  Thank goodness for Faye.  She won't become another notch on his bedpost! Anyway, I thought Dunaway and Beatty did a great job playing the outlaws. I liked the romance that develops between the two while they continue committing one felony after another.  I was confused during their first very awkward and weird sex scene, only to learn after the fact that Clyde was supposed to be impotent.  That made so much more sense! 

I loved Dunaway's wardrobe in this film. She looked so glamorous as Bonnie.  I could have done without Dunaway and Beatty's affected Southern accents, but I suppose that was needed for the Southern US setting. I also thought it was funny how much Clyde kept bragging about his crime and announcing his and Bonnie's names loudly, and with so much pride.  Isn't the point to rob the banks and maintain some level of anonymity? No wonder they were caught so easily?

There is a funny scene where Bonnie and Clyde kidnap the couple (Gene Wilder in his film debut, and Evans^2 playing his girlfriend) whose car they've just stolen.  I thought it was funny when Bonnie and Clyde just abruptly abandoned them in the middle of nowhere. 

Michael J. Pollard plays CW Moss, a young man that Bonnie and Clyde bring into the fold to be their getaway driver.  I immediately recognized Pollard from the Hayley Mills movie "Summer Magic," and he also appeared as Virgil in an episode of "The Andy Griffith Show." I loved the scene where CW parallel parks the getaway car while Bonnie and Clyde rob a bank.  When they come out, the getaway car is nowhere to be scene.  Way to go guys! Then, Pollard can't get the car out of the parking space because he's been boxed in! Hilarious. 

Gene Hackman appears in the film as Buck Barrow, Clyde's older brother.  He was okay, but he definitely wasn't my favorite character.  Then Roseanne Connor's mom, Bev, aka Estelle Parsons, appears in the film as Buck's wife, Blanche.  The less said about her, the better.  Blanche Barrow is one of the most annoying characters I've ever seen in a film.  Her screeching, for whatever reason, is perfect on "Roseanne," when you have Laurie Metcalf and John Goodman to appear visibly irritated and angry.  The best Estelle Parsons scene in "Bonnie in Clyde," imo, is when Faye Dunaway, finally at the end of her rope, yells at Parsons to shut up.  Thank you Faye. Ugh! 

Bonnie and Clyde's story ends with them being ambushed in Louisiana and their car (and bodies) are riddled with bullets. I was surprised how violent this scene was for 1967. I don't think it's a spoiler to say that Bonnie and Clyde died.  Anyone with any knowledge of the true story would know that this was going to be the inevitable conclusion--as much as I wanted those crazy kids to make it.

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

I was surprised how violent this scene was for 1967.

So was everyone else it sorta kick started along with Spaghetti Westerns the very realistic violence depicted in the films we have today. 

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2 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

So was everyone else it sorta kick started along with Spaghetti Westerns the very realistic violence depicted in the films we have today. 

Supposedly Clyde was supposed to have part of his skull shot off, I missed that, but I think I'll look for that if I watch this film again.

When Gene Hackman was shot in the head, I thought that was pretty graphic for a 60s film as well.

I am just imagining Bonnie and Clyde being produced in the 40s where people were shot, but there was never any blood.  I feel like we'd see Bonnie and Clyde drive up, the police surround them with weapons drawn, then we'd hear a bunch of gunfire, see Bonnie and Clyde shaking as if they were being shot up, then we'd see their bodies lying across the seat, no blood.  The car though, would be full of bullet holes.  I don't know if a production code era Bonnie and Clyde would have been as effective.

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

  I don't know if a production code era Bonnie and Clyde would have been as effective.

Well, there is GUN CRAZY (1949/50)

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Just now, LornaHansonForbes said:

Well, there is GUN CRAZY (1949/50)

I have seen that one before.  I'd have to re-watch it to recall the specific details. I remembered enjoying the bank robbery scenes. Gun Crazy is a good comparison to Bonnie and Clyde though. These would be a good double feature.

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21 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Putting Ralph Richardson and Christmas together reminds me anew that The Holly and the Ivy is coming to DVd and blu-Ray next week.....

i was literally thinking of that film earlier. it premiered on TCM last year and I thought it was excellent.

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The Irishman Poster

The Irishman 8/10 Current release

I finally got to see this, I don't have Netflix and luckily got to see it in a NYC theater. 

It's based on the true story of the disappearance of Jimmy Hoffa and the mob hitman Frank Sheeran who was a close friend. Martin Scorsese directed and has the dream cast of Robert DeNiro as Sheeran, Al Pacino as Hoffa with Joe Pesci and Harvey Keitel in smaller roles. 

It is a excellent film due mostly to the acting. DeNiro and Pacino have not been this good in decades. Just seeing them on screen talking to each other is worth the price of admission. It probably could have been trimmed a bit from it's 3 1/2 hour running time but it's never boring. It seemed to me like a much more low key version of the Scorsese mob classics Goodfellas and Casino, this one does not have the shocking brutality and raucous black humor of those. Any fan of the two stars can just sit back and let the magic happen. 

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2 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I have seen that one before.  I'd have to re-watch it to recall the specific details. I remembered enjoying the bank robbery scenes. Gun Crazy is a good comparison to Bonnie and Clyde though. These would be a good double feature.

The first time I saw BONNIE AND CLYDE was maybe 8-10 years ago and i found it a little bit of a let-down, but that was largely related to the fact that I was born in '78 and had seen plenty of violent films. I am sure it BLEW AUDIENCES MINDS in 1967.

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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ps- google image search if ye like, but WOOF! The real BONNIE AND CLYDE were not attractive at all.

Haha! I googled them last night.  My husband said the same thing about the real Bonnie versus Faye Dunaway Bonnie. The real Bonnie was only like 4'10 and literally had to be carried around by Clyde because she was basically an invalid after they had a really bad car fire during one of their escapades and it burned off most of one of her legs.

I think the real Clyde was only 5'6 and while in jail, he purposely had an inmate chop off two of his toes so that he could get out of the manual labor at the prison.  Then, he was sprung from jail 6 days later because his mom somehow convinced the prison to let him go--talk about not getting your money's worth out of purposely chopping off your toes.  After that, Clyde walked with a limp because he was missing toes.

Between all this and Clyde's bravado, no wonder these fools were ambushed so easily.

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If you're on a Bonnie & Clyde kick, you might want to watch The Highwaymen on Netflix. It stars Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson as the men who eventually ended Bonnie & Clyde's crime career. The criminal duo are shown throughout, but only fleetingly. 

The movie's not bad, but it's full of inaccuracies, which wouldn't be much of a problem for me, only that the filmmakers talked up how much research they did and how realistic they were making the details.

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13 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

The first time I saw BONNIE AND CLYDE was maybe 8-10 years ago and i found it a little bit of a let-down, but that was largely related to the fact that I was born in '78 and had seen plenty of violent films. I am sure it BLEW AUDIENCES MINDS in 1967.

I wasn't let down by the film, because I didn't really know what to expect, except I knew that the real Bonnie and Clyde were shot to death in their car.  I figured that that was going to happen to them at some point.  I didn't expect the film to end so abruptly after their car is shot up. 

I also missed the fact that Clyde was supposed to be impotent.  Talk about playing against type for Beatty! I just thought he and/or Bonnie were awkward.  My husband criticized the camera work and editing at the beginning, because despite Dunaway obviously being nude, you didn't see anything. Lol.  I thought the opening of the film was pretty risque.

I really loved Dunaway's costumes in the film. I think that was my favorite part.  My other favorite part is Michael J. Pollard moving the getaway car while Bonnie and Clyde are robbing the bank.  That part was funny.

The scene where Bonnie is having the family reunion was weird.  At first, I couldn't figure out if it was a dream or if it was actually happening.  The way the scene was shot reminded me of those scenes in Happy Gilmore where Happy dreams about his happy place.

I hated hated hated Estelle Parsons in this film.  I wanted someone to shoot her and put her out of her misery. 

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6 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

If you're on a Bonnie & Clyde kick, you might want to watch The Highwaymen on Netflix. It stars Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson as the men who eventually ended Bonnie & Clyde's crime career. The criminal duo are shown throughout, but only fleetingly. 

The movie's not bad, but it's full of inaccuracies, which wouldn't be much of a problem for me, only that the filmmakers talked up how much research they did and how realistic they were making the details.

Thanks! I haven't heard of this movie. 

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9 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

If you're on a Bonnie & Clyde kick, you might want to watch The Highwaymen on Netflix. It stars Kevin Costner and Woody Harrelson as the men who eventually ended Bonnie & Clyde's crime career. The criminal duo are shown throughout, but only fleetingly. 

The movie's not bad, but it's full of inaccuracies, which wouldn't be much of a problem for me, only that the filmmakers talked up how much research they did and how realistic they were making the details.

Oh God! ... a movie with both Kevin and Woody? Yike!!! Two of the most irritating actors ever. This is probably one of those Netflix originals that are hyped to the hilt.

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1 minute ago, laffite said:

Oh God! ... a movie with both Kevin and Woody? Yike!!! Two of the most irritating actors ever. This is probably one of those Netflix originals that are hyped to the hilt.

I believe Gershwin Fan reviewed it on here somewhere, perhaps the "Films of 2019" thread. He liked it a lot, as I recall.

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I made a thread on it a while back. I liked the historical accuracy in regards to the couple (yes, I know the prison escape wasn't exactly how it went but they also weren't fun loving kids) the most, that it didn't try to whitewash the couple and portray Hamer as a tool like the 1967 film did (though it is still a much better film). I don't have a problem with either actor though so if you dislike them then yeah, you won't like it.

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20 minutes ago, Gershwin fan said:

I made a thread on it a while back. I liked the historical accuracy in regards to the couple (yes, I know the prison escape wasn't exactly how it went but they also weren't fun loving kids) the most, that it didn't try to whitewash the couple and portray Hamer as a tool like the 1967 film did (though it is still a much better film). I don't have a problem with either actor though so if you dislike them then yeah, you won't like it.

My problem with it was the depiction of Bonnie & Clyde, especially Bonnie. There's actually no real evidence that she ever killed anyone herself, yet the film shows her as a sadistic cop-killer who enjoys tormenting her targets. I'm not saying that either of them were angels, or even good people at all, but they weren't the super-sinister, highly-competent figures of malevolent dread that this latest film depicted them as, either. It's the same problem as the '67 film, but only in the opposite direction.

For anyone interested in the real story, I suggest reading the comprehensive Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI by Bryan Burrough. It covers all of the major crime figures of the period, including Bonnie & Clyde, John Dillinger, Machine Gun Kelly, Baby Face Nelson, Ma Barker's family, among others. It illustrates how the exploits of these criminals, as well as the cops chasing them, were greatly exaggerated by the media of the day, both to sell papers, and in an orchestrated effort by J. Edgar Hoover to prove how necessary the FBI was, and how they needed to be granted greater policing powers.

I'd also recommend reading up on the real Frank Hamer and his wife. Their true-life story would make a good movie, too.

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24 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

My problem with it was the depiction of Bonnie & Clyde, especially Bonnie. There's actually no real evidence that she ever killed anyone herself, yet the film shows her as a sadistic cop-killer who enjoys tormenting her targets. I'm not saying that either of them were angels, or even good people at all, but they weren't the super-sinister, highly-competent figures of malevolent dread that this latest film depicted them as, either. It's the same problem as the '67 film, but only in the opposite direction.

For anyone interested in the real story, I suggest reading the comprehensive Public Enemies: America's Greatest Crime Wave and the Birth of the FBI by Bryan Burrough. It covers all of the major crime figures of the period, including Bonnie & Clyde, John Dillinger, Machine Gun Kelly, Baby Face Nelson, Ma Barker's family, among others. It illustrates how the exploits of these criminals, as well as the cops chasing them, were greatly exaggerated by the media of the day, both to sell papers, and in an orchestrated effort by J. Edgar Hoover to prove how necessary the FBI was, and how they needed to be granted greater policing powers.

I'd also recommend reading up on the real Frank Hamer and his wife. Their true-life story would make a good movie, too.

The book sounds interesting. I do love true crime. The bank robbers during the Great Depression were especially fascinating.

I read that Hamer's widow sued Warner Brothers for his depiction in the 1967 Bonnie and Clyde. I cannot recall if she won or if WB settled, probably the latter I imagine. But she did receive some compensation.  

Apparently the real Blanche Barrow was not impressed with her portrayal by Estelle Parsons (gosh I can't imagine why). I don't know if she actually sued or whether she just expressed her dissatisfaction with the final result. 

I had vague details about Bonnie and Clyde going in, except for their grisly demise, so I didn't have issues with Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty's portrayal.  I actually only found their accents a bit grating.  But after the film, I read up on the real couple and I can see where Warren Beatty took liberties with their story.  One of the liberties he took was that Bonnie was actually married to someone else when she took up with Clyde.  There was no marriage proposal like in the film. 

I actually wondered for a split second if Bonnie and Clyde would go straight and move to a state where they hadn't yet committed a felon. I was kind of rooting for them, but then I figured that Beatty probably wouldn't use that much creative license.  Then when CW's dad was pretending to change his tire over and over again, I knew what was coming. 

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26 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

Apparently the real Blanche Barrow was not impressed with her portrayal by Estelle Parsons (gosh I can't imagine why). I don't know if she actually sued or whether she just expressed her dissatisfaction with the final result. 

And just think, Estelle Parsons won an Oscar for her performance. 

giphy.gif

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6 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

And just think, Estelle Parsons won an Oscar for her performance. 

giphy.gif

 I saw " Bonnie and Clyde" twice in the  movie theater when it first came out. They held it over.

Apart from all the blood and shooting, the main thing I remember the most is how the theater audience started screaming and laughing when they saw Estelle Parsons on the screen. it seems like she stole the show. Although some say it was a cross between her and Michael J Pollard. Speaking of which, whatever became of Michael J. Pollard?

 The last time I saw Estelle Parsons, she was in Al Pacino's  Richard III play, docudrama/ whatever movie thing with Alec Baldwin.

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1 minute ago, Princess of Tap said:

 I saw " Bonnie and Clyde" twice in the  movie theater when it first came out. They held it over.

Apart from all the blood and shooting, the main thing I remember the most is how the theater audience started screaming and laughing when they saw Estelle Parsons on the screen. it seems like she stole the show. Although some say it was a cross between her and Michael J Pollard. Speaking of which, whatever became of Michael J. Pollard?

 The last time I saw Estelle Parsons, she was in Al Pacino's  Richard III play, docudrama/ whatever movie thing with Alec Baldwin.

Like speedy mentioned above, a lot of people now know Estelle Parsons (who turned 92 this year) as Roseanne's mother on the Roseanne sitcom and its follow-up The Connors, the latter of which she appeared in this year. Just think of that family tree - Roseanne's mother is Estelle Parsons, and Estelle's mother was played by Shelley Winters. Yikes!

I thought Michael J. Pollard had died but he's still around, having turned 80 back in May. I've seen him in a lot of low-budget genre stuff, but nothing high profile.

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1 minute ago, LawrenceA said:

Like speedy mentioned above, a lot of people now know Estelle Parsons (who turned 92 this year) as Roseanne's mother on the Roseanne sitcom and its follow-up The Connors, the latter of which she appeared in this year. Just think of that family tree - Roseanne's mother is Estelle Parsons, and Estelle's mother was played by Shelley Winters. Yikes!

I thought Michael J. Pollard had died but he's still around, having turned 80 back in May. I've seen him in a lot of low-budget genre stuff, but nothing high profile.

I like Estelle better on Roseanne than in Bonnie and Clyde.  Her shrill voice works better for her Bev character, since everyone is supposed to find her completely irritating.  I loved the episodes with Shelley Winters.  She was hilarious as Nana Mary. I liked her because she drove Bev insane. 

When Pollard came on screen, I immediately recognized him from Summer Magic. I don't know what else he's in besides that, Bonnie and Clyde and an episode of The Andy Griffith Show. To me, he looked like a little Karl Malden.

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