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speedracer5
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22 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

And just think, Estelle Parsons won an Oscar for her performance. 

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Re: the Oscar. Ugh. That's all I can say.  When she came running from the house, my husband thought she was wielding a knife. That would have been funnier than the spatula.

She reminds me a lot of Jack Lemmon as "Daphne" from Some Like it Hot in this clip. I was amazed about how her voice hasn't changed at all in 50 years.

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3 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

When Pollard came on screen, I immediately recognized him from Summer Magic. I don't know what else he's in besides that, Bonnie and Clyde and an episode of The Andy Griffith Show. To me, he looked like a little Karl Malden.

The main things I recall Michael J. Pollard from besides Bonnie & Clyde are an episode of Star Trek (1966), Little Fauss & Big Halsey (1970) with Robert Redford, Dirty Little Billy (1972) as Billy the Kid, Melvin and Howard (1980), and Scrooged (1988). I've seen him in a lot more (Sleepaway Camp III: Teenage Wasteland, anyone?), but the above are what I remember him from.

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40 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Like speedy mentioned above, a lot of people now know Estelle Parsons (who turned 92 this year) as Roseanne's mother on the Roseanne sitcom and its follow-up The Connors, the latter of which she appeared in this year. Just think of that family tree - Roseanne's mother is Estelle Parsons, and Estelle's mother was played by Shelley Winters. Yikes!

I thought Michael J. Pollard had died but he's still around, having turned 80 back in May. I've seen him in a lot of low-budget genre stuff, but nothing high profile.

In one episode, Parsons even says the famous "I'm just a preacher's daughter" line from Bonnie and Clyde, though I don't remember the specific episode or context it was.

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7 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

 I liked the film. I'm not sure if I'd need to watch it over and over, but I'm glad I saw it. I also loved the music.

The bluegrass music really helps set the rural 30s scene.

This tune was also used in a Simpsons episode - "Hey, they didn't start chasing us until you turned on that getaway music!" :lol: 

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On 11/12/2019 at 6:22 PM, nakano said:

THE CRIMINAL 1960 directed by Joseph Losey AKA THE CONCRETE JUNGLE.In the UK,Stanley Baker is pulling a racetrack robbery.Very good cast Nigel Green,Patrick Magee,Sam Wanamaker etc Baker is excellent as usual,a stalwart leading man, good in every type of role approx 97 min.I  do not know if this film was ever shown on TCM 8/10

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Yes, this was shown on TCM a few years ago. Brilliantly directed film noir, with a first-rate performance by Stanley Baker in the lead role.

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Blandings (2013–2014)

I expected to enjoy this two-season series because it is based on stories by P.G. Wodehouse. Jeeves and Wooster (1990–1993) is based also on his stories and I love it so much that I own three complete sets of the DVDs so as to ensure against damage or loss.

I am sorry to say this series is a bitter disappointment. It is made more bitter by the fact that the absolute brilliance of the source material often sparkles through the muck of bad direction, incompetent pacing and a desperate bid by most of the cast to win the: "worst acting in a supposed comedy series" award in both UK and EU divisions.

Jennifer Saunders is a true comedy treasure but she is here a bloated dullard with no sense of timing.

Timothy Spall is precious in many of his roles but he left his genius in his other pants when he took on this one.

Mark Williams boldly and bravely did his best in a bad situation but even his remarkable talents could do nothing but provide a glimpse of what truly marvelous wonders of wit and preposterous circumstances had been buried under six feet of pig manure. The powers-that-be must have noted how his performance was so much greater than the other actors' and so replaced him for the second season.

I could find no credit for: Empress. Her gentle grunting provided some of the series' rare moments of charm. 

P. G. Wodehouse's humor has to be presented with a flamboyant confidence. This series has less panache than roadkill.

It was free with Amazon Prime but it left the feeling that I have been cheated.

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6 hours ago, SansFin said:

I expected to enjoy this two-season series because it is based on stories by P.G. Wodehouse. Jeeves and Wooster (1990–1993) is based also on his stories and I love it so much that I own three complete sets of the DVDs so as to ensure against damage or loss.

Wow, that's what I call taking precautionary measures. Not just two, but three. Great tribute. I have an eight-CD set in a single jacket that I got don't remember where (and cheap) and keep wanting to get into that. Years ago I remember seeing what I believe to be possibly the premier episode on television and recall only that it had a rather catchy music theme. 

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14 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The main things I recall Michael J. Pollard from besides Bonnie & Clyde are an episode of Star Trek (1966), Little Fauss & Big Halsey (1970) with Robert Redford, Dirty Little Billy (1972) as Billy the Kid, Melvin and Howard (1980), and Scrooged (1988). I've seen him in a lot more (Sleepaway Camp III: Teenage Wasteland, anyone?), but the above are what I remember him from.

Pollard was reunited with Warren Beatty in Dick Tracy (1990). Beatty of course played the title role and Pollard was Bug Bailey, a police wiretap expert. Estelle Parsons also has a cameo as Tess Truehart's mother. 

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5 hours ago, laffite said:

Wow, that's what I call taking precautionary measures. Not just two, but three. Great tribute. I have an eight-CD set in a single jacket that I got don't remember where (and cheap) and keep wanting to get into that. Years ago I remember seeing what I believe to be possibly the premier episode on television and recall only that it had a rather catchy music theme. 

I ordered a set of Jeeves and Wooster (1990-1993) and was gifted a set at the same time. I failed to remove it from my list of DVDs to find when I am browsing pawn-shops and that later led to the third set. 

It is a wonderful series and I urge you strongly to get into it. Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry are perfectly cast. Their comedic timing is impeccable. The entire production kept the heart and soul of the original material.    

The theme music is sprightly and there are songs of the era in several episodes. Hugh Laurie's rendition of: "Forty-Seven Ginger-Headed Sailors" is not to be missed. 

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I love BONNIE AND CLYDE, but I have to agree that Blanche Barrow was annoying as heck. I don't think I would have given Estelle the Oscar for it though.

The movie was groundbreaking for its time, but compared to today's movies I can see why the violence in BONNIE AND CLYDE might seem tame to younger viewers. Still a great flick though.

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12 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I love BONNIE AND CLYDE, but I have to agree that Blanche Barrow was annoying as heck. I don't think I would have given Estelle the Oscar for it though.

The movie was groundbreaking for its time, but compared to today's movies I can see why the violence in BONNIE AND CLYDE might seem tame to younger viewers. Still a great flick though.

All she did was scream.  She was not an asset to Bonnie and Clyde's bank robbing operation at all.  If anything, she drew attention to them, plus she ratted them out. I wouldn't have awarded her an Oscar either. 

Apparently the 1967 Best Supporting Actress Nominees that year were:
 

Estelle Parsons- Bonnie and Clyde

Carol Channing- Thoroughly Modern Millie

Mildred Natwick- Barefoot in the Park

Beah Richards- Guess Who's Coming to Dinner

Katharine Ross- The Graduate
 

This is crazy, but I've actually seen all the nominated films! Except it's been awhile and I cannot remember any specifics about any of the ladies' performances. I'd be inclined to give it to Natwick because I liked her from The Enchanted Cottage, but I cannot recall her in Barefoot in the Park.  I did like Thoroughly Modern Millie but more for the costumes.  Hmm... I'm not sure which nominee was more deserving than Parsons.

 

 

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5 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

All she did was scream.  She was not an asset to Bonnie and Clyde's bank robbing operation at all.  If anything, she drew attention to them, plus she ratted them out. I wouldn't have awarded her an Oscar either. 

Apparently the 1967 Best Supporting Actress Nominees that year were:
 

Estelle Parsons- Bonnie and Clyde

Carol Channing- Thoroughly Modern Millie

Mildred Natwick- Barefoot in the Park

Beah Richards- Guess Who's Coming to Dinner

Katharine Ross- The Graduate
 

This is crazy, but I've actually seen all the nominated films! Except it's been awhile and I cannot remember any specifics about any of the ladies' performances. I'd be inclined to give it to Natwick because I liked her from The Enchanted Cottage, but I cannot recall her in Barefoot in the Park.  I did like Thoroughly Modern Millie but more for the costumes.  Hmm... I'm not sure which nominee was more deserving than Parsons.

 

 

It's ironic that the one cast member in BONNIE AND CLYDE that I feel wasn't Oscar worthy ends up being the only one who took the award home.

Any and all of the four nominees  in the Supporting Actress category that year would have been a more worthy winner than Parsons.

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1 minute ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

It's ironic that the one cast member in BONNIE AND CLYDE that I feel wasn't Oscar worthy ends up being the only one who took the award home.

Any and all of the four nominees  in the Supporting Actress category that years would have been a more worthy winner than Parsons.

I would have given the Oscar to either Faye Dunaway or Michael J. Pollard for Bonnie and Clyde

I'm also inclined to want to give the 1967 Best Supporting Actress Oscar to Katharine Ross. Not because I love The Graduate so much (I actually thought it was kind of boring), but because I loved her in The Stepford Wives

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4 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I think Parsons was as worthy as any of the other nominees.

We'll have to agree to disagree....all she did was scream her lungs out most of the time, like speedracer said. The other nominees in the other films did a heck of a lot more than that.

Plus I'm not really a big fan of Parsons' acting ability in anything she has done.

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7 minutes ago, Hibi said:

I think Parsons was as worthy as any of the other nominees. There wasn't really a front runner that year. Ross was really a lead performance, I'm glad she didnt win.

I think if Ross were submitted as Best Actress, she would have been up against Katharine Hepburn and Faye Dunaway.  The studio must have thought Ross had a better shot in the Supporting Actress category.

Parsons may have been worthy, I just found her incredibly annoying.

EDIT: I originally wrote about Hepburn and Streisand's tie.  That was a different year. 

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Edited to remove wrong information discovered after I performed some research
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I actually don't mind Estelle Parsons as Roseanne's mom in Roseanne.  I think her tendency to be shrill and screechy is funny within the context of the other characters.  I especially loved it when she had scenes with Nana Mary, Shelley Winters.

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4 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

We'll have to agree to disagree....all she did was scream her lungs out most of the time, like speedracer said. The other nominees in the other films did a heck of a lot more than that.

Plus I'm not really a big fan of Parsons' acting ability in anything she has done.

She was very good in Rachel, Rachel the same year....

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Rewatched McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971) This Altman western is sort of a part of a triptic it  borrows from Day Of The Outlaw, and Corbucci's The Great Silence and in return Keoma and later HBO's Deadwood borrows from this film.

This film was a good example of where the western genre could go exploring and be a fresh take.

 

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