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I have been feeling very low lately and watching almost nothing but episodes of the 1960's BATMAN SERIES...even some of the godawful [LOUIE THE LILAC] ones (although I can never stand to watch any of the SHAME EPISODES.)

I'm kind of surprised by how much I enjoyed some of the ones that I did not recall as being as good as they were.

I am so happy this show was freed from purgatory (for years it wasn't on DVD or cable and it was put up and taken down from youtube)- now it's everywhere, and the ROKU channel offers it.

The LIBERACE ONE was better than i recall. the MISS TALLULLAH BANKHEAD one too. NORA CLAVICLE AND THE LADIES CRIME CLUB is one of the worst half hours of television ever.

God, how great was it to live in GOTHAM CITY, 1966 and have your nightly opera broadcast interrupted by this?:

(funniest line of the series at 1:40)

 

 

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5 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Not even All About Eve? Or On the Waterfront? Or The Bridge on the River Kwai?

I know, I consider these films very much classics, as well as BEN-HUR and FROM HERE TO ETERNITY. AN AMERICAN IN PARIS, THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH, GIGI and AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS, while good films, I don't think I would have given the top honor to though.

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6 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Not even All About Eve? Or On the Waterfront? Or The Bridge on the River Kwai?

Oh God no (although DAVIS is marvelous). a firm NO. And, eh.

I think RIVER KWAI has moments but- hate me if you will for this- part of me wishes it had been an EALING COMEDY instead.

 

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Years where the Best Picture Oscar winner matches my personal choice for best movie of the year:

  • 1930 - All Quiet on the Western Front
  • 1934 - It Happened One Night
  • 1942 - Casablanca* (this won for 1943, but I include it with the year it was released. Mrs Miniver won the 1942 Best Picture Oscar, and is my #2 choice for the year)
  • 1946 - The Best Years of Our Lives
  • 1957 - The Bridge on the River Kwai
  • 1962 - Lawrence of Arabia
  • 1972 - The Godfather
  • 1974 - The Godfather Part II
  • 1991 - The Silence of the Lambs
  • 1992 - Unforgiven
  • 1993 - Schindler's List
  • 2004 - Million Dollar Baby
  • 2007 - No Country for Old Men
  • 2013 - 12 Years a Slave
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4 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

PATHS OF GLORY from the same year as KWAI has a much more direct, unambiguous message IN RE: war, courage, misplaced loyalties etc.

(ironic that it's from KUBRICK!)

(ALTHOUGH some people prefer the ambiguity and WAR IS HELL MADNESS of the ending of KWAI.)

Paths of Glory is my #3 choice for best movie of 1957, behind Kwai and 12 Angry Men.

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3 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Just curious, what is it about ALL ABOUT EVE you don't like?  Personally, I think it was the perfect choice for Best Picture that year.

I prefer Sunset Boulevard, although All About Eve is still in my top ten for that year.

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33 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Years where the Best Picture Oscar winner matches my personal choice for best movie of the year:

  • 1930 - All Quiet on the Western Front
  • 1934 - It Happened One Night
  • 1942 - Casablanca* (this won for 1943, but I include it with the year it was released. Mrs Miniver won the 1942 Best Picture Oscar, and is my #2 choice for the year)
  • 1946 - The Best Years of Our Lives
  • 1957 - The Bridge on the River Kwai
  • 1962 - Lawrence of Arabia
  • 1972 - The Godfather
  • 1974 - The Godfather Part II
  • 1991 - The Silence of the Lambs
  • 1992 - Unforgiven
  • 1993 - Schindler's List
  • 2004 - Million Dollar Baby
  • 2007 - No Country for Old Men
  • 2013 - 12 Years a Slave

God forgive me, but I still love GWTW.

 

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29 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Just curious, what is it about ALL ABOUT EVE you don't like?  Personally, I think it was the perfect choice for Best Picture that year.

at the risk of going on too long about it-

The third act has problems, ANNE BAXTER takes it to a 12 as only she could, but it would've been better played to a 9 or 9.5. THELMA RITTER disappears from the story. BETTE DAVIS takes  a back seat in the third act- although her LITERAL back seat scene IS TERRIFIC.

Also, and I know this is nitpicky, but at the same time, FILM is a VISUAL MEDIUM- nothing exciting happens shotwise or camerwise or lighting wise or even with the sets and there is some BAD REAR PROJECTION FOOTAGE That ruins a street scene between GEORGE SANDERS and ANNE BAXTER

GARY MERRILL is also a stiff.

Most of all though: IMAGINE THE HANDCLAP EMOJI BETWEEN MY EVERY WORD BELOW:

I DO NOT BUY ONE MINUTE OF THE IDEA THAT SOMEONE WITH NO TRAINING AT ALL WOULD BE GIVEN A BROADWAY LEAD. I just NEVER EVER EVER BUY THAT and I am SORRY IF IT HAS HAPPENED IN REAL LIFE THAT I DON'T KNOW ABOUT, but that is JUST TOO LUDICROUS.

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Like, I mean- the LIGHTS GO DOWN and you hear

"Ladies and gentlemen, due to unforeseen circumstances, MISS TALLULAH BANKHEAD will not be seen in tonight's performance of AGED IN WOOD. Instead, MISS DELORES FINGERBINGER from BRANSON, MO is going on for her in instead..."

and then try not to be KILLED in the stampede of people running for the exits.

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40 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

at the risk of going on too long about it-

The third act has problems, ANNE BAXTER takes it to a 12 as only she could, but it would've been better played to a 9 or 9.5. THELMA RITTER disappears from the story. BETTE DAVIS takes  a back seat in the third act- although her LITERAL back seat scene IS TERRIFIC.

Also, and I know this is nitpicky, but at the same time, FILM is a VISUAL MEDIUM- nothing exciting happens shotwise or camerwise or lighting wise or even with the sets and there is some BAD REAR PROJECTION FOOTAGE That ruins a street scene between GEORGE SANDERS and ANNE BAXTER

GARY MERRILL is also a stiff.

Most of all though: IMAGINE THE HANDCLAP EMOJI BETWEEN MY EVERY WORD BELOW:

I DO NOT BUY ONE MINUTE OF THE IDEA THAT SOMEONE WITH NO TRAINING AT ALL WOULD BE GIVEN A BROADWAY LEAD. I just NEVER EVER EVER BUY THAT and I am SORRY IF IT HAS HAPPENED IN REAL LIFE THAT I DON'T KNOW ABOUT, but that is JUST TOO LUDICROUS.

I think Bette is marvelous in this movie.

But you were so right about Joe Mankiewicz. He was a good writer and he would sacrifice the cinematic for his written word. The kind of thing a genius like Hitchcock would never do.

Since this movie is about the theater, I kind of went along with it. It's a lot like a stage play. But there are a lot of moments which are very boring and conversations that last too long.

The talent of both Bette and Anne Baxter carries this movie.

Also when Bette went on to do live theater with Gary Merrill, after she had married him, she realized too that he wasn't really quite up to Snuff-- theatrically wise. LOL

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I DO NOT BUY ONE MINUTE OF THE IDEA THAT SOMEONE WITH NO TRAINING AT ALL WOULD BE GIVEN A BROADWAY LEAD. I just NEVER EVER EVER BUY THAT and I am SORRY IF IT HAS HAPPENED IN REAL LIFE THAT I DON'T KNOW ABOUT, but that is JUST TOO LUDICROUS.

I don't buy that a big star would even care about an absolute nobody, like Margot does sat the beginning. Oh, come right into my dressing room and sit down. Tell us your story.

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11 minutes ago, laffite said:

I don't buy that a big star would even care about an absolute nobody, like Margot does sat the beginning. Oh, come right into my dressing room and sit down. Tell us your story.

Karen is the one who originally brought Eve inside and introduced her.  I thought that Margo's interest in Eve was not because she was really interested in her, but out of morbid curiosity.  Eve is the one whom they've seen standing outside the theater, day in and day out.  Then Eve mentions that she's seen every performance, Margo's ego may have also taken over at that point as well.

I love All About Eve.  I've seen it at least a dozen times (if not more) and I never tire of it. I only wish Birdie hadn't disappeared after bringing the sable coat to the movie star. 

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

at the risk of going on too long about it-

The third act has problems, ANNE BAXTER takes it to a 12 as only she could, but it would've been better played to a 9 or 9.5. THELMA RITTER disappears from the story. BETTE DAVIS takes  a back seat in the third act- although her LITERAL back seat scene IS TERRIFIC.

Also, and I know this is nitpicky, but at the same time, FILM is a VISUAL MEDIUM- nothing exciting happens shotwise or camerwise or lighting wise or even with the sets and there is some BAD REAR PROJECTION FOOTAGE That ruins a street scene between GEORGE SANDERS and ANNE BAXTER

GARY MERRILL is also a stiff.

Most of all though: IMAGINE THE HANDCLAP EMOJI BETWEEN MY EVERY WORD BELOW:

I DO NOT BUY ONE MINUTE OF THE IDEA THAT SOMEONE WITH NO TRAINING AT ALL WOULD BE GIVEN A BROADWAY LEAD. I just NEVER EVER EVER BUY THAT and I am SORRY IF IT HAS HAPPENED IN REAL LIFE THAT I DON'T KNOW ABOUT, but that is JUST TOO LUDICROUS.

I gotta agree about Thelma Ritter disappearing from the film without an explanation. I would have loved to have seen more of her.

But I think speedracer has a point about Margo being more curious about Eve rather than truly interested in her. And that curiousity wore thin as soon as Margo began to see that Eve was a beginning to be a hit with everyone, her friends, her boyfriend, Addison De Witt, that it bruised her ego, which I don't think is very far-fetched at all.

As for Gary Merrill, well he wouldn't have been my choice for the role but I think he was adequate enough.

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1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

Karen is the one who originally brought Eve inside and introduced her.  I thought that Margo's interest in Eve was not because she was really interested in her, but out of morbid curiosity.  Eve is the one whom they've seen standing outside the theater, day in and day out.  Then Eve mentions that she's seen every performance, Margo's ego may have also taken over at that point as well.

I love All About Eve.  I've seen it at least a dozen times (if not more) and I never tire of it. I only wish Birdie hadn't disappeared after bringing the sable coat to the movie star. 

I remain unpersuaded but I'll have another look. It's coming up in a couple of days. I'm recording it.

 

 

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Since finishing my Alfred Hitchcock marathon, I've watched Star Trek season 3, aka "the bad one"

Star-Trek-TOS-Season-3-posteredited.jpg

 

Two Doctor Who serials featuring the Third Doctor (Jon Pertwee) - Spearhead from Space and Death to the Daleks

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Three Doctor Who serials featuring the Fourth Doctor (Tom Baker) - The Ark in SpaceThe Sontaran Experiment, and The Brain of Morbius 

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A couple of episodes of The Starlost, a Canadian series featuring Keir Dullea that has justly been ranked as one of the worst sci-fi shows ever made

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The first season of Space: 1999, a show I'd managed to miss for the past 44 years

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The pilot movie of Wonder Woman, with Lynda Carter, Lyle Waggoner, Cloris Leachman, Stella Stevens, Henry Gibson, and Red Buttons

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The much-vaunted BBC series I, Claudius

iclaudius_2580209b.jpg

 

and now season 2 of Space: 1999, featuring new addition Catherine Schell as shape-shifting alien Maya

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Just finished rewatching Akira Kurosawa’s Rashamon(1950). I still hold firm that this is one of the greatest films of all time. In a way it’s Japan’s Citizen Kane. It introduced the world to Japanese cinema and the mastery of Kurosawa. I can’t describe the brilliance of it. If you’ve never seen it please do!!

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On 11/19/2019 at 12:05 PM, speedracer5 said:

Bonnie and Clyde (1967)

I loved Dunaway's wardrobe in this film. She looked so glamorous as Bonnie.  I could have done without Dunaway and Beatty's affected Southern accents, but I suppose that was needed for the Southern US setting.

Faye Dunaway was born in the Florida panhandle and went to high school there. Her Southern accent in BONNIE AND CLYDE is very authentic although I don't know if it is similar to the real Bonnie Parker's accent.

Yes, Theadora Van Runkle's costumes for Faye Dunaway in the movie are fantastic. And Miss Dunaway looks gorgeous in them, even in the famous scene with the cigar. 

 

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Jeepers Creepers---you stay away for a few days and you miss so much on this site!  I guess it's my own fault.  I've got other interests beyond classic movies.  I know, I know.  You're probably wondering, "Why would you have other interests beyond classic movies?".  😁

My take on what's been recently discussed:

Marty--I like this movie.  It's poignant and has elements of dignity and charm to it.  The interaction between Marty and his friends is typical for the era depicted in the film.  The exchanges between Marty and his mother and Aunt Catherine are spot-on from what I remember growing up in an Italian-American household and neighborhood, even though it wasn't in a large enclave like in New York or other large cities.

Batman Television Series--This was one of my favorite programs to watch in the 60's.  I like how at the beginning of each episode, it was posted on the screen and/or the announcer would say, "Tonight's Guest Villain _____ as "_____.".  I always thought that was a cool touch.  The Joker and Catwoman were my favorite villains, and of the 3 who played Catwoman, my favorite portrayal was always turned in by Eartha Kitt (although Julie Newmar and Lee Merriwether were good too).

Rashomon--I saw this movie for the first time the last time it aired on TCM, and I was blown away.  It was a very good story, and while I sometimes find it difficult to follow subtitled films, it wasn't too bad an experience.  If a film is good enough though, you'll want to watch it again and again...subtitles be damned!  This movie certainly fits that category.  Kurosawa was a terrific filmmaker.

All About Eve--I understand the complaints about the flaws exposed in this film, but it's still a fun watch for me.  Everybody in the cast gets to spout at least one memorable line that fans of the picture have memorized forward and backward.  For those complaining about the shortcomings of this one, if I may paraphrase Addison DeWitt, "You're all too short to criticize this film!". 😅

Paths of Glory---If it weren't for Susanne Christian singing in the bar at the end of the picture, this one would almost be the equivalent antithesis of "The Women".  In other words, it's almost a sausage-fest of testosterone-only characters, but the principle players pull you into this one with their performances.  It's a very good movie.

Finally, I was able to watch The Last Picture Show in its entirety when it aired on TCM last week.  It's only about the third time I've seen this film, and it's one of those that I like more and more with each viewing.  The dialog is simple, and the portrayals presented by the men and women are so honest that it had me drawing parallels to people I remember from my youth.  Even though I graduated from high school 24 years after the setting in Anarene, there were plenty of aspects from 1952 that still rang true in my salad days.  While the setting took place in a small Texas town, it really could have happened in any small town in any of the other 47 states (at the time).  This is one of those movies that (to me) was so well done I wouldn't have minded if it ran for 3 hours.

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one of the reasons I ADORE CLASSIC RADIO is that it acts as a sort of parallel universe where the same stories we know BY HEART are told with notable diffrences, it's like discovering a secret room in a house you thought you knew every inch of.

and such is the 1 hour rendering of ALL ABOUT EVE with TALLULAH BANKHEAD as BETTE DAVIS as TALLULAH BANKHEAD.

I APOLOGIZE THAT THE AUDIO OF THE FIRST CLIP IS NOT GREAT, BUT IT IS HALL OF FAME SHADE.

 

THE QUALITY OF THE AUDIO HERE IS BETTER, BUT IT IS DIVIDED INTO SIX PARTS. HERE IS PART ONE, FOR PARTS 2-6, YOU MIGHT HAVE TO GO TO YOUTUBE, BUT IT'S WORTH IT

 

 

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On 11/23/2019 at 12:58 PM, misswonderly3 said:

Very nicely written. Thanks, cinemaspeak, for that review of The Irishman.

I'm planning to see it myself this coming Tuesday. It's playing for all of one week at my local one and only review cinema in the small city I live in. I'm looking forward to seeing it, I almost always love anything Scorsese does.

"That said", I am disappointed and chagrined that a film like The Irishman isn't getting a proper run in movie theatres. Very limited, limited in terms of both time (one or two weeks only) and venues (very few actual cinemas are showing it) -- nope, very short-term run and then straight to Netflix.

There's probably a thread about this already, and I don't want to derail this one, but recently I've been feeling very disappointed and even anxious about all the streaming of movies, even new-release ones. I actually like going out to see a movie in a real movie theatre sometimes (like, several times a year.)  I'm worried that this activity is rapidly going to become obsolete. I will miss it, very much.

Thank you, Miss W. In my opinion nothing beats the theater experience. Hopefully, it will never become obsolete.  About Netflix, they seem to provide a nurturing environment for film makers. I don't know if a traditional studio would have given Marty the freedom to make a 3.5 hour period drama. 

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