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Mechanical Principles (1930).  Raspberry Beret Noir*

Despite the caption in the Youtube video, this was actually made in 1930. 7/10 for being mesmerizing.

*It's the kind of movie you'd find in a secondhand store.  And making up nonsense subgenres in order to sound erudite is fun.

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14 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Not meaning to shill [but shilling] you might look in to getting amazon prime if you got the spare income, i've been pretty pleased with some of the weirder titles they show, it's MUCH more interesting than NETFLIX.

As something of a BAD MOVIE COMPLETIST, I admit that sometimes JUST MAKING IT THROUGH AND BEING ABLE TO SAY I HAVE SEEN SOMETHING IN ITS ENTIRETY is more the goal than actually SITTING AND REALLY WATCHING THE FILM ITSELF (if that makes any sense) and there are some BAD MOVIES that feel like a 400 pound weight on your sternum- genuinely and truly, STAYING ALIVE was NOT one of those bad movies, it was in NO SENSE a chore to make it through, I was rapt by every wonderawful minute of it. i didn't check my phone or play sudoku or start sketching, I was EVERY BIT AS ENTHRALLED as I was by SEVEN SAMURAI- for completely different reasons, mind you.

It has a delightful, infectuous STUPIDITY- so real and unforced, so DETERMINED to proceed forward without QUESTIONING- this is HOLLYWOOD AVARICE at its COKE FUELED-FINEST- I am hard-pressed to think of a more DELIGHTFUL WATCHING EXPERIENCE in my recent memory.

EDIT- HERE'S THE TRAILER, REALLY BUT A SOUPCON OF WHAT THE MOVIE IS. ALSO, I WENT TO WIKIPEDIA and STAYING ALIVE grossed $126 million WORLDWIDE.

 

I have Amazon Prime already! That's how I watched The Hitch-Hiker and The Bigamist for the first time.

I literally only have Netflix for The Great British Baking Show.  My husband watches something (maybe more than one thing), I honestly don't know what it is.  I'm not really interested in everyone's "Original Programming" about the latest social issue du jour. 

Image result for ain't nobody got time for that


Give me 100 episodes of The Golden Girls or give me death!

One of my favorite "bad movies" is Roller Boogie.  That movie is amazing.  My favorite part is when Linda Blair wants to give up her Julliard scholarship (to be a flautist) to devote her time exclusively to practicing for the roller disco contest at the end of the summer--because of course, you cannot participate in a summer-long contest and go to school in the fall.  You might get discovered and become a professional roller boogie person.

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3 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I, Tonya (2017) Neo Bio Noir On Skates.

91sdED38DpL._SY679_.jpg


"A White Trash Tragedy"

A Bio Noir that is a fantastically entertaining combo of ice-skating Noir Suspense (1946) (yes there was one), small time racketeering in The Setup (1949), the victim of circumstances of Detour (1945), the end of the professional road depicted in Requiem For A Heavyweight (1962), with the dimwit three stooges like shenanigans of the cheap crooks in Deadline At Dawn (1946), Manhandled (1949) Raising Arizona (1987), Wild At Heart (1990), Hit Me (1996), Fargo (1996), A Simple Plan (1998), The Big Lebowski (1998), and Before The Devil Knows You're Dead (2007).

One of the bennies of watching a lot of Film Noir is that you become very familiar with a large range of actors from the classical period Noirs through the transitional Noirs to our current era of  Neo Noir who seem made for certain parts and they easily slip into certain shady characters like one would slip into a comfortable pair of slippers.

When you think of low rent, cheap, sleazy, slimy, weaselly crooks you think of Classic Noir actors Zachary Scott or Dan Druyea. In this film Zachary would get the nod he looks like the real Jeff Gilhoolie. Dan Seymore or Victor Buono would have made a good Shaun, Doro Merande or Agnes Moorhead as Tonya's mother, Tonya would have probably been played by Belita (the star of our ice skating Noir Suspense) but, if they could skate, I could see Shelly Winters or Barbara Stanwyck, in it or Joan Crawford with blonde hair.

Anyway, projecting the past performers upon this film in no way diminishes it.

Directed competently and stylishly by Craig Gillespie. The film was written by Steven Rogers and based on the sometimes contradictory interviews with all the participants. I, Tonya sort of depicts a modern take on the type of small time racketeering that in Classic Hollywood would have focused on boxing or horse racing. That it is about the "seedy underworld" of ice skating (who would of thunk it) makes it all the more hilarious. Aftermath interviews are displayed in 4:3 ratio.


The incident all started when Tonya received a death threat at a competition. Gilhooly her bodyguard Shaun, and Tonya didn't take it seriously they just figured it was psychological warfare aimed at Tonya. Gilholly and Shaun cook up a scheme to send threatening letters to her arch rival skater Nancy Kerrigan. Tonya was in on the planning for that finding out where Nancy would be practicing for the address of where to send the letters.

Shaun the halfwit bodyguard points out that Gilhooly can't mail the letters from Portland since they would point back to them. Convincing Gilhooly that the best course would be to let Shaun send two of his "operatives" to the venue city to mail the letters there. It all goes Noirsville when Shaun changes the plan and has the operatives try and break Nancy's leg instead.

Starring Margot Robbie as Tonya Harding, Mckenna Grace as young Tonya Harding, Maizie Smith as Tonya Harding (age 4), Sebastian Stan as Jeff Gillooly, Harding's lover and friend, later husband,  Allison Janney as LaVona Golden, Harding's abusive mother, Julianne Nicholson as Diane Rawlinson, Harding's skating coach. Caitlin Carver as Nancy Kerrigan, Paul Walter Hauser as Shawn Eckardt, a bodyguard and friend of Gillooly, and Bobby Cannavale as Martin Maddox, a former Hard Copy reporter. Full review with more screencaps at Noirsville.

It's a lot of fun to watch 9/10.

I saw this, it was fantastic.

As someone who has lived in Oregon my entire life, I fully remember the 1993-1994 US women's figure skating drama.  My mom and I used to be really into watching ice skating to the point where we could say things like "Nicole Bobek wasn't able to land her double axle, triple toe loop at Nationals, maybe she can do it at Worlds." Anyway, I remember watching the competition that Nancy Kerrigan was supposed to skate in, but couldn't because of being clubbed in the knee.  My girl, Michelle Kwan, placed second and would have been able to go to the Olympics had the US Olympics committee not decided to send Kerrigan instead.  Blech.  I never liked Nancy Kerrigan, I thought she was a snob.  I was glad when she lost the gold medal at Lillehammer.

Anyway, the 1994 Winter Olympics are hands down the best Olympics I have ever seen.  The 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta run a close second.  

I remember when someone in NW Portland found all Tonya's evidence in the dumpster outside of a restaurant.  It seemed like such a bonehead move, but something that Harding & co. would totally do.  While I don't believe Harding was directly involved in injuring Kerrigan, I do think she was complicit with her husband and bodyguard since she did know what they were planning.

I loved the bodyguard in the film with his "expertise in counterespionage." 

I also loved Allison Janney's parrot: a red-bellied Conure.

Another of my favorite parts was the part where Tonya described how people think she attacked Kerrigan.  That was pretty funny.

Tonya Harding used to practice on the ice rink at the Lloyd Center mall in NE Portland.  The ice rink is still there.  Every time I go there, I always hope that I'll see Tonya skating.  Alas, I never do. I think Tonya moved to Washington. 

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ISLE OF DOGS (2018) *Score: 4/5* 

Good job, Wes Anderson. I really enjoyed this; there was just the right amount of humor and seriousness. 

Image result for isle of dogs 2018

ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST (1968) *Score: 2/5*

I'm really sorry to anyone who enjoys this one, but it was super slow and the characters were very boring. I couldn't sympathize with anyone except for the dead people.

INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (1956) **REWATCH/ Score: 3.5/5

This was due for a rewatch; I've always thoroughly enjoyed this one, although it can be a bit hokey at times. 

Image result for invasion of the body snatchers 1956

DOUBLE INDEMNITY (1944) *Score: 3.5/5*

I think I gave this a bit of a lower score, only because I read the novel beforehand, so I knew the plot and everything already. 

Image result for double indemnity 1944

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6 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

ISLE OF DOGS (2018) *Score: 4/5* 

Good job, Wes Anderson. I really enjoyed this; there was just the right amount of humor and seriousness. 

Image result for isle of dogs 2018

That picture makes it look terrible, but I'm a huge Wes Anderson fan. THANK YOU for your succinct thoughts on this. Yay! My li-berry has a copy!

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12 hours ago, Fedya said:

Mechanical Principles (1930).  Raspberry Beret Noir*

Despite the caption in the Youtube video, this was actually made in 1930. 7/10 for being mesmerizing.

*It's the kind of movie you'd find in a secondhand store.  And making up nonsense subgenres in order to sound erudite is fun.

Love all the different gear types, including planetary, reduction, eccentric, cams, pawls, and of course geneva movement.  The very start of Metropolis has an interesting montage too but this is better.

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The filmmaker, Ralph Steiner, made a similar movie a year earlier called H2O which, as you can guess, is about water.

There are a lot of versions of it on Youtube since it was a silent and people added their own music to it:

 

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On ‎12‎/‎7‎/‎2019 at 1:10 AM, NickAndNora34 said:


INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (1956) **REWATCH/ Score: 3.5/5

This was due for a rewatch; I've always thoroughly enjoyed this one, although it can be a bit hokey at times. 

Image result for invasion of the body snatchers 1956

DOUBLE INDEMNITY (1944) *Score: 3.5/5*

I think I gave this a bit of a lower score, only because I read the novel beforehand, so I knew the plot and everything already. 

Image result for double indemnity 1944

Politics aside, it's very unsettling to think that we humans can be transformed into something  cold, unfeeling, inhuman in a blink's eye by something that fell out of the sky. That's why INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS always chilled me to the bone. (The 1978 remake however does end with an even more downbeat and chilling twist).

Never read the book. but the film version of DOUBLE INDEMNITY, I always enjoyed. We see poor Walter Neff (Fred MacMurray) getting bamboozled by the seductive, yet manipulative Phyllis Dietrichson  (Barbara Stanywyck). And of course see Edward G. Robinson as Barton Keyes, turns in an Oscar worthy performance (of course the Academy, knowing them and their 'wisdom' of picking out nominations never so much as nominated Robinson for this or any other brilliant part he played in his long career), the man who is a lot more cleverer than either Neff or Phyllis could have guessed.

 

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21 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

I saw the 1976 version of king Kong from Amazon Prime. Yes, it is the most maligned of the three versions. Yes, the ape effects look a bit dated now. But yet, the story still casts its magic spell, aided by two wonderful leads in Jessica Lange and Jeff Bridges, and of course, the gorilla, who radiates more sympathy than horror than he did in 1933. John Barry supplies a marvellous score, and when the inevitable finale comes, I was sobbing profusely. I feel that is worth a reevaluation.

I can't imagine why anyone could possibly want to watch this thing and still live. 

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52 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

I can't imagine why anyone could possibly want to watch this thing and still live. 

I remember wanting to see this as a kid--Of course, that was back when the studio was fraudulently telling us about the new life-sized "mechanical Kong" they'd built for the movie, and implying that he'd be in more than one scene.  🤨

(And the one on the Universal Studios ride was better.)

ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST (1968) *Score: 2/5*

I'm really sorry to anyone who enjoys this one, but it was super slow and the characters were very boring. I couldn't sympathize with anyone except for the dead people.

But at least now you have a better idea of who Harvey Korman's Hedley Lamarr was parodying...

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15 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

INVASION OF THE BODY SNATCHERS (1956) **REWATCH/ Score: 3.5/5

This was due for a rewatch; I've always thoroughly enjoyed this one, although it can be a bit hokey at times. 

Image result for invasion of the body snatchers 1956

 

This review reminds me that I just saw John Carpenter's 1982 take on THE THING for the first time in years a few days ago. The camaraderie of the military men in the Howard Hawks original is replaced by body snatching "Is my best friend an alien?" paranoia here. That, plus the still impactful (if gross out) special effects sequences still make the remake quite a thrill ride. Excellent performances by the all male cast (as well as a few huskies) adds to the credibility. I love the '51 original but the remake competes with it in suspense and excitement, even if their endings couldn't possibly be any more different from one another.

The-Thing-1982-Movie-Poster-720x340.jpg

 

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17 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I saw this, it was fantastic.

As someone who has lived in Oregon my entire life, I fully remember the 1993-1994 US women's figure skating drama.  My mom and I used to be really into watching ice skating to the point where we could say things like "Nicole Bobek wasn't able to land her double axle, triple toe loop at Nationals, maybe she can do it at Worlds." Anyway, I remember watching the competition that Nancy Kerrigan was supposed to skate in, but couldn't because of being clubbed in the knee.  My girl, Michelle Kwan, placed second and would have been able to go to the Olympics had the US Olympics committee not decided to send Kerrigan instead.  Blech.  I never liked Nancy Kerrigan, I thought she was a snob.  I was glad when she lost the gold medal at Lillehammer.

Anyway, the 1994 Winter Olympics are hands down the best Olympics I have ever seen.  The 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta run a close second.  

I remember when someone in NW Portland found all Tonya's evidence in the dumpster outside of a restaurant.  It seemed like such a bonehead move, but something that Harding & co. would totally do.  While I don't believe Harding was directly involved in injuring Kerrigan, I do think she was complicit with her husband and bodyguard since she did know what they were planning.

I loved the bodyguard in the film with his "expertise in counterespionage." 

I also loved Allison Janney's parrot: a red-bellied Conure.

Another of my favorite parts was the part where Tonya described how people think she attacked Kerrigan.  That was pretty funny.

Tonya Harding used to practice on the ice rink at the Lloyd Center mall in NE Portland.  The ice rink is still there.  Every time I go there, I always hope that I'll see Tonya skating.  Alas, I never do. I think Tonya moved to Washington. 

Robbie is almost a lock coming up in snagging her 2nd nomination for either BOMBSHELL or ONCE UPON A TIME IN HOLLYWOOD as Sharon Tate

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& Janney took home an Academy Award for it

 

at the local theatre  I was going to another picture but lots of young & in shape girls were coming out of it  Obviously also athletes

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THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY (2012) *Score: 3/5*

This was a rewatch. I rewatched it yesterday for my birthday, as I was in the mood for something of a lighter fare. I don't care what anyone says, the Hobbit trilogy is very entertaining. 

Image result for hobbit an unexpected journey

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I watched a trio of disparate movies recently: Apocalypse Now Redux (1979/2001); To Kill a Mockingbird (1962); and Heidi (1937).  

Apart from a few scenes, I had never seen Apocalypse Now, so I've more than made up for that oversight by watching the longest version possible (202 minutes). I'm not sure how I feel about it and will have to watch it again. I don't think I like the cliched way in which the characters are portrayed, even if it is based on Heart of Darkness. There are certainly impressive set pieces. and I didn't mind the extended running time, although I've read that people have criticized the inclusion of the additional scenes, e.g. the plantation scene and the scene with the women. I think I would have preferred more time with Kurtz, rather than the road movie in a boat approach. And it is an annoyingly noisy movie, but I guess war -- and that war in particular -- was noisy.

I hadn't seen To Kill a Mockingbird since I was about the age of the children in the film. I didn't remember much about the details. The fact that Mayella was being sexually abused by her father certainly never occurred to me as a child. I wonder how that would play out today. Would there be more sympathy for her?   I also did not know that the character of Dill Harris was based on Truman Capote as a boy. In any case, it's a great film, with so many little details worth cherishing.  I watched the film with friends who had recently seen the Broadway play based on the book. They felt the movie is far superior to the play. The DVD also includes Fearful Symmetry, an excellent 1998 documentary about the film, featuring many of the cast members and creative team. 

I remember Heidi as being one of my favorite Shirley Temple movies. Actually, seeing after many years, it's probably not as good as some of her earlier work. Her big song with the wooden shoes is one of her weakest numbers in any of her films: it slows the whole business down. But Heidi is a sweet story, has great ambience and a great cast. The always fine Helen Westley is particularly good as the blind grandmother. Mary Nash is a suitably evil b_itch as the appropriately named Fraulein Rottenmeier. Perhaps Ms. Nash could also have played Kurtz in Apocalypse Now or Bob Ewell in To Kill a Mockingbird

frenchplantationscene.jpeg

TO_KILL_A_MOCKINGBIRD_STILL_02_758_427_8

primary_heidi.jpg

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A couple days ago I watched a Boris Karloff and Peter Lorre dark comedy called The Boogie Man Will Get You (1942) on YouTube. Back in the day actors could do it all. Karloff and Lorre could do both horror and comedy flawlessly. In a nutshell, it's about a professor (Karloff) who is trying to turn people into superhumans for the war effort.  One of his guests stumbles upon a dead body in his laboratory and reports it to the town sheriff (Lorre). The professor then has no choice but to join forces with him. Of course, the sheriff has plans of his own. Anyone who loves the old comedies will find this a treat. It's not as good as Arsenic and Old Lace, but I really enjoyed it.

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Loophole (1981)

It is Martin Sheen as an American architect living in London. His business partner bails when they are unable to acquire a new large contract and the firm closes. He is unable to find a position elsewhere because he is overqualified. His bills mount and mount as he has two children in expensive schools and his wife is starting a design business.

Albert Finney is a safecracker who is tired of small scores and so plans a major heist. He needs an architect to determine the exact location to tunnel from the city storm sewer system into a bank vault.

Susannah York, Jonathan Pryce, Colin Blakely and Tony Doyle are the primary supporting cast. They all acquit themselves well. Robert Morley has a charming role as the banker who highlights how a grand lifestyle while unemployed means disaster for the overdraft.

I find this to be one of the most unusual bank heist caper movies I have ever watched. The basic plot parallels the 1976 robbery at Société Générale in Nice. Finney bringing Sheen into the fold progresses step by step until Sheen has no choice. Planning the caper is methodical. Performing the caper is methodical. Escaping the rising water as a sudden shower floods the storm sewers is methodical. 

It is more of a character study split between Sheen and Finney than it is a tense, action-filled heist. It is not even that because Sheen's character merely wobbles from bad situation to bad situation and we never learn what strengths he might have. Finney's very understated performance is that of a man with a thick shield to keep others from knowing him well.

I like the movie and I recommend it for any person who wishes a quiet night rather than seeking a heart-pounding adventure typical of the genre. I will likely watch it again at some time in the future but I doubt I will feel compelled to do so any time soon.
 

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10 hours ago, Swithin said:

I hadn't seen To Kill a Mockingbird since I was about the age of the children in the film. I didn't remember much about the details. The fact that Mayella was being sexually abused by her father certainly never occurred to me as a child.

Exactly. Everyone talks about how great the movie is and know it's time for a re-viewing because so much was over my head at that age.

10 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

 

Image result for hobbit an unexpected journey

Ugh whatever happened to a handsome, clean looking hero? I'd rather look at THIS vvv for two hours instead of THAT ^^^

errol-flynn-4500.jpg

A big part of the appeal of classic movies...the "look" of them.

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Ugh whatever happened to a handsome, clean looking hero? I'd rather look at THIS vvv for two hours instead of THAT ^^^

Bilbo Baggins isn't supposed to be a hunk. He's a dopey little gnome who gets thrown into an adventure. 

If you need some guys to ogle, Orlando Bloom and Luke Evans show up later on, but the Hobbit movies are generally about gnomes and dwarfs, and casting someone that looks like Errol Flynn in those roles would be silly, although there are a few of the dwarf characters played by guys who are normally considered handsome (Richard Armitage and Aidan Turner for example), outside of their dwarf-character make-up and costumes.

All that being said, while I love the Lord of the Rings movies, I thought the Hobbit movies were far inferior.

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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Bilbo Baggins isn't supposed to be a hunk. He's a dopey little gnome who gets thrown into an adventure. 

And even then, "supposed" to be a typical English peasant, who prefers his garden and den to epic adventures, and brings that bit of common sense to all the dwarves-and-dragon nonsense.

And I will say that the first half hour of AUJ, over dinner, raised our hopes that the entire Trilogy would be as faithfully book-friendly as Jackson's LOTR trilogy had been.  But then the Seventh Doctor shows up with bird poop on his head borrowing one of Smaug's big classic book lines, and once they set off, the whole Trilogy immediately slams down the gas pedal and rockets off on a self-indulgent highway to hell.  🙄

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Re: The Hobbit 

The point I was trying to make is that I enjoy the "Hobbit" movies because they entertain me. I do think the LOTR trilogy is much better, but I enjoy the Hobbit movies, because sometimes I like to just sit down and not have to do much analyzing, like with most of the movies I have to watch for film club. Woof. We're going on 4 foreign dramas in a row now. 

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Just now, LawrenceA said:

Which four, if I may ask?

Happy Together (1997), City of God (2002), 3-Iron (2004), and The Girl who Leapt Through Time (2006)

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Just now, NickAndNora34 said:

Happy Together (1997), City of God (2002), 3-Iron (2004), and The Girl who Leapt Through Time (2006)

An unusual line-up. I haven't seen The Girl Who Leapt Through Time, but I've seen the other three. City of God is probably the most easily-accessible. It's good, but I wasn't as blown away by it as many were at the time.

3-Iron is odd, and a bit slow.  I liked it quite a bit, but it may be tough going for some. Happy Together is a good example of director Wong Kar-Wai's style,  and features a good performance by my favorite Chinese actor, Tony Leung Chiu-Wai, but I like some of the director's other films more (In the Mood for LoveAshes of Time). Happy Together made a big stir at the time of its release due to the matter-of-fact handling of a gay relationship. Now it won't seem as "shocking", but in '97 it was still enough to cause a bit of controversy. 

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19 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Exactly. Everyone talks about how great the movie is and know it's time for a re-viewing because so much was over my head at that age.

Ugh whatever happened to a handsome, clean looking hero? I'd rather look at THIS vvv for two hours instead of THAT ^^^

errol-flynn-4500.jpg

A big part of the appeal of classic movies...the "look" of them.

Normally I remove the images from posts I'm quoting, or at the very least, I make them smaller.  But this picture deserves to be shown again in all its glory.

I cannot stand the LOTR movies or anything LOTR-adjacent.  Ugh.  Talk about 100 years of my life I won't get back watching those things.  There is no eye candy at all.  Orlando Bloom doesn't even do anything for me when he's himself, let alone as  an elf with horrible ugly long blonde hair! 

Now, if they made a movie about Gollum, and only Gollum, maybe I'd watch that.  Gollum: The Musical!  or something. 

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