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I'm watching the T.V. show Shane,  with David Carradine,  Jill Ireland and Tom Tully.      Carradine's screen persona is a perfect fit for Shane.

Instead of a married Starett couple with a young boy, Ireland plays a widow and Tully her step-father;  the reason for this plot change should be obvious.

Sadly Jill Ireland is really weak here .          The show only ran for one year.     I never knew it even existed until today.

PS:  watching more episodes and Ireland does get better as the series moved on.

Jill Ireland Christopher Shea Shane 1966.JPG

 

 

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Blackadder the Third  (1987) 

I love this series. I believe Seasons #2 and #3 are in a tie as the best in the series. I did not care much for Season #1, as Blackadder was just an idiot, it was funnier when he became the sarcastic smart aleck, and Hugh Laurie was the dim Prince . Baldrick always remained the same, the filthy, but well meaning scruff.  

Two episodes stand out as the best and IMO two of the funniest sitcom episodes ever

Sense And Senility-The Prince wants to take speech lessons from a pair of prissy and untalented actors. Blackadder finds that saying the word "Macbeth" to them drives them crazy in some of the funniest moments.

Duel And Duality- The Prince is challenged to a duel with the loud and violent Duke of Wellington (Stephen Fry in a hilarious performance). The Prince begs Blackadder to pose as him in the duel.

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5 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I love this series. I believe Seasons #2 and #3 are in a tie as the best in the series. I did not care much for Season #1, as Blackadder was just an idiot, it was funnier when he became the sarcastic smart aleck, and Hugh Laurie was the dim Prince . Baldrick always remained the same, the filthy, but well meaning scruff. 

Actually, in the first "Prince Bean" season, Baldrick the First is the only smart-peasant-in-the-room character with rational intelligence.  It's only his descendants that had a bit of a problem with their Cunning Plans.

And yes, 2&3 (and "Blackadder's Christmas Carol") are considered the classics, whereas the WWI "Blackadder Goes Forth" was considered to be tiring out and off-puttingly preachy, and that "revival" fifth "Blackadder Back & Forth" movie made for the Millennium Dome was...best left forgotten.  There was talk of a swinging-60's-London "The Blackadder Five", but Richard Curtis thought the fourth-series humor was already becoming too repetitive.

Two episodes stand out as the best and IMO two of the funniest sitcom episodes ever

Sense And Senility-The Prince wants to take speech lessons from a pair of prissy and untalented actors. Blackadder finds that saying the word "Macbeth" to them drives them crazy in some of the funniest moments.

Duel And Duality- The Prince is challenged to a duel with the loud and violent Duke of Wellington (Stephen Fry in a hilarious performance). The Prince begs Blackadder to pose as him in the duel.

Although Ink and Incapability, where a jealous Blackadder frustrates pompous Samuel Johnson (Robbie Coltrane) shortly before Baldrick loses the manuscript to Dr. Johnson's dictionary, would probably take Sense's interchangeable place.

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"Godzilla King of The Monsters" (2019) on the free weekend HBO.  The other Titans BOWED before him! 

That's right he's King! :D

 

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Detour (1945)

I had read a lot of good things about this film and finally decided to watch it. I’m happy to say that it lived up to the hype. It doesn’t have a complicated plot like some noir, but it made me want to keep watching every second. The acting was great and I would watch it again.

Act of Violence (1949)

This is a film that I did not enjoy. My biggest problem is that there is very little tension created. Robert Ryan plays the antagonist, but receives very few lines and very little screen time. It’s like if Cape Fear focused solely on Gregory Peck, while Robert Mitchum strolled by every 20 minutes to remind us that he was in the film, too. Van Heflin’s performance was very good, though. 

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I watched Gone With The Wind for the first time in well over a decade, and was struck, once again, by the extraordinarily  impressive professionalism of this Selznick production. It is the film by which everyone involved is arguably best remembered today. The second half, dealing with the marriage of Scarlett and Rhett, is a little less involving and certainly less epic than the first half, with its gracious fantasy depiction of antebellum Georgia.

Of course the film has also long been a source of controversy for its false depiction and stereotyping of slaves and there are a few too many casual references to "darkies" in the screenplay. The portrayal, in particular, of Prissy (Butterfly McQueen) as a simple minded black maid makes many viewers (actually most, I suspect) more than a little squeamish. One of the film's more famous scenes is the "I don't know nothing about birthing no babies" one in which Scarlett slaps her. You have mixed feelings about a scene like that though it can also be seen as a cathartic moment for those irritated by Prissy's character. If The Birth of a Nation bursts through your front door with its blatant racism then GWTW comes more gently through your back door with it.

On the other hand Hattie McDaniel's Mammy brings warmth, humour and common sense wisdom to her stereotyped role. Mammy is, perhaps, the most likeable character in the film and I only wish there could have been more scenes between her and Rhett, as McDaniel and Gable had great chemistry in their scenes together.

But, for all of the film's many overwhelming virtues, including art direction, stunning cinematography and the legendary musical score of Max Steiner, with its sweeping "Tara's Theme," the most dominant impression emerging from this repeat viewing of the film for me was the magnificence of Vivien Leigh's performance as Scarlett O'Hara. She captures all of the many moods of this fiery southern belle, as well as the strength and determination. Scarlett is a self centred **** in much of the film (you may well wonder why Rhett puts up with the abuse) but she is also inspirational as a hard nosed survivor.

Leigh also manages to be very funny in a few scenes, none more so than when she is somewhat inebriated in one of the best written scenes in the film when cynical Rhett, on bended knee, pokes fun at the whole idea of romance while proposing marriage to her. I love this scene. Rarely in either of their careers, I feel, would either Leigh or Gable match this moment again.

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But, arguably, the film's single most dramatic moment occurs just before the film's half way intermission. Scarlett, desperate for food, throws up after trying to eat a root of some kind she found in the dirt. She lies on the ground weeping for a few seconds but slowly rises. As Steiner's music magnificently builds she then makes a declaration, "As God is my witness" that they're not going to lick her, that, whatever it takes, lying, cheating, stealing, killing, she and her family will never starve again. It's a glorious, truly stirring film moment, one of the great moments of the movies, in fact, sure to run chills up your spine.

I don't know if, in an overall appraisal of her career (there's mixed opinions about this) Vivien Leigh was a great actress. I do know, though, that she gives a film performances for the ages in Gone With The Wind.

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10 hours ago, YourManGodfrey said:

Detour (1945)

I had read a lot of good things about this film and finally decided to watch it. I’m happy to say that it lived up to the hype. It doesn’t have a complicated plot like some noir, but it made me want to keep watching every second. The acting was great and I would watch it again.

Act of Violence (1949)

This is a film that I did not enjoy. My biggest problem is that there is very little tension created. Robert Ryan plays the antagonist, but receives very few lines and very little screen time. It’s like if Cape Fear focused solely on Gregory Peck, while Robert Mitchum strolled by every 20 minutes to remind us that he was in the film, too. Van Heflin’s performance was very good, though. 

YourManGodfrey, I have to disagree strongly with your comments about these two films. It's  the other way around with me. I dislike Detour, I find it unpleasant from beginning to end, there's a kind of relentless nastiness about it . I've never understood why it's so popular, at least with most noir aficionados. 

Act of Violence, on the other hand, is actually one of my favourite noirs. Perhaps if you've only seen it once, the subtleties of both the lead characters can be missed. I liked this film the first time I saw it, but after several viewings, I can say I think it's one of the best noirs, definitely in my top 10.  

It's not at all like Cape Fear, and if you're trying to fit it into that kind of box, it's small wonder you don't much like it. The Robert Ryan character is not a psychopath like Mitchum's character in Cape Fear. The story goes into some detail to explain why Joe (Ryan's character) is so bent on finding Frank (Heflin's character) and exacting revenge on him. In fact, one of the things that makes Act of Violence interesting to me is the "greyness" of both these men's characters, how in many ways, Joe is the "good guy" and Frank's the "bad". But because of its intelligent screenplay, it's more complicated than that. In a way,  this film represents one of the major noir themes of the early post-war era: men who've returned from the war and who are damaged in some way - not always physically - and the aftermath of the trauma they may have suffered. It also examines that noirest of themes, the reality that most human beings are neither "good" nor "bad", but are made up of aspects of both, and the struggle they experience trying to figure out which part of their character they'll choose to act upon.

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51 minutes ago, misswonderly3 said:

YourManGodfrey, I have to disagree strongly with your comments about these two films. It's  the other way around with me. I dislike Detour, I find it unpleasant from beginning to end, there's a kind of relentless nastiness about it . I've never understood why it's so popular, at least with most noir aficionados. 

Act of Violence, on the other hand, is actually one of my favourite noirs. Perhaps if you've only seen it once, the subtleties of both the lead characters can be missed. I liked this film the first time I saw it, but after several viewings, I can say I think it's one of the best noirs, definitely in my top 10.  

It's not at all like Cape Fear, and if you're trying to fit it into that kind of box, it's small wonder you don't much like it. The Robert Ryan character is not a psychopath like Mitchum's character in Cape Fear. The story goes into some detail to explain why Joe (Ryan's character) is so bent on finding Frank (Heflin's character) and exacting revenge on him. In fact, one of the things that makes Act of Violence interesting to me is the "greyness" of both these men's characters, how in many ways, Joe is the "good guy" and Frank's the "bad". But because of its intelligent screenplay, it's more complicated than that. In a way,  this film represents one of the major noir themes of the early post-war era: men who've returned from the war and who are damaged in some way - not always physically - and the aftermath of the trauma they may have suffered. It also examines that noirest of themes, the reality that most human beings are neither "good" nor "bad", but are made up of aspects of both, and the struggle they experience trying to figure out which part of their character they'll choose to act upon.

After sleeping on it, Act of Violence wasn’t as terrible as I made it out to be. I wasn’t trying to make a direct comparison to Cape Fear in that regard. I just thought that the suspense was lacking and I was never really on the edge of my seat until the final few scenes. 
 

 

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5 minutes ago, YourManGodfrey said:

After sleeping on it, Act of Violence wasn’t as terrible as I made it out to be. I wasn’t trying to make a direct comparison to Cape Fear in that regard. I just thought that the suspense was lacking and I was never really on the edge of my seat until the final few scenes. 
 

 

Well, thanks for acknowledging Act of Violence wasn't all that bad after all. I've often seen a film that I didn't much like, sometimes for the same reasons as you-- that I had a certain expectation of the movie based on its genre or something else, and then felt let down . In the case of Act of Violence, seems it was suspense you were looking for and found lacking.

I actually do think it has some quite suspenseful moments. But the film is to me more a character study than a plot-based suspense film, so I can see where you'd be disappointed if you were expecting the latter.

By the way, I see you're a newbie . Welcome to the TCM boards !

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4 hours ago, TomJH said:

As Steiner's music magnificently builds she then makes a declaration, "As God is my witness"

She thought turkeys could fly?

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1 minute ago, misswonderly3 said:

Well, thanks for acknowledging Act of Violence wasn't all that bad after all. I've often seen a film that I didn't much like, sometimes for the same reasons as you-- that I had a certain expectation of the movie based on its genre or something else, and then felt let down . In the case of Act of Violence, seems it was suspense you were looking for and found lacking.

I actually do think it has some quite suspenseful moments. But the film is to me more a character study than a plot-based suspense film, so I can see where you'd be disappointed if you were expecting the latter.

By the way, I see you're a newbie . Welcome to the TCM boards !

Thank you! I’ve been watching classic movies for my entire life, I recently started to really get into them within the past year. War and westerns were my go-to genres, and now I’ve branched out into everything, so my critiques might come off as more simplistic than most on here. Noir has become one of my favorite genres. I think part of the reason I disliked the movie was that I recently got into Robert Ryan and was expecting to see more of him. Before On Dangerous Ground, I only knew him from Battle of the Bulge and hated him. I feel compelled to fix that and watch the rest of his films now. 😂

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3 minutes ago, YourManGodfrey said:

Thank you! I’ve been watching classic movies for my entire life, I recently started to really get into them within the past year. War and westerns were my go-to genres, and now I’ve branched out into everything, so my critiques might come off as more simplistic than most on here. Noir has become one of my favorite genres. I think part of the reason I disliked the movie was that I recently got into Robert Ryan and was expecting to see more of him. Before On Dangerous Ground, I only knew him from Battle of the Bulge and hated him. I feel compelled to fix that and watch the rest of his films now. 😂

I was on a Robert Ryan kick awhile back too.  I haven't watched his war films or westerns yet, because neither of those are my favorite genres--but I think I have a couple of them recorded.

As for Ryan noir, I recommend The Set-Up, Crossfire, and Odds Against Tomorrow

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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

YourManGodfrey, I have to disagree strongly with your comments about these two films. It's  the other way around with me. I dislike Detour, I find it unpleasant from beginning to end, there's a kind of relentless nastiness about it . I've never understood why it's so popular, at least with most noir aficionados. 

I think the nastiness works in Detour in a way that it doesn't work in a lot of movies, especially non-noirs.  These are all desperate people (well, mostly Ann Savage), and that despration shines through.  There's a similar unrelenting nastiness in Caged that works well, and has an effect on the Eleanor Parker character.

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4 minutes ago, YourManGodfrey said:

Before On Dangerous Ground, I only knew him from Battle of the Bulge and hated him. I feel compelled to fix that and watch the rest of his films now. 😂

I assume you really hate Dan Duryea.       I'm cracking wise here and I see you put a happy face at the end of your post.

The point being that if one likes or dislikes an actor based on the roles they play (verses their acting chops),   Duryea would be one of the most disliked actors of studio era movies.

 

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All Fall Down (1962)

Brandon De Wilde tries to cope with a family of Tennessee Williams character wannabes: Dad Karl Malden, Mom Angela Lansbury, and brother Hud (actually, Berry-Berry, played by Warren Beatty).  De Wilde idolizes his older brother (hence the comparison to Hud) but finds out he's really a jerk after Berry-Berry steals his would-be girlfriend Eva Marie Saint.  Who knows if any of the characters gain any semblance of sanity after the events depicted in the movie?

While the nastiness of Detour works for me, the general nastiness of the characters who aren't actually out of the mind of Tenessee Williams but seem like they should be (the movie was based on a novel by the same guy who wrote Midnight Cowboy with the screenplay adapted by William Inge of Picnic fame) doesn't work here at all.  I found myself wondering if Malden came to the set one day with the idea that since he had won an Oscar playing a Tennessee Williams character, perhaps that's just what this movie needd.  De Wilde gives a fine young adult performance, but everybody else in the immediate family is beaten by the histrionics..

5/10

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12 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

I was on a Robert Ryan kick awhile back too.  I haven't watched his war films or westerns yet, because neither of those are my favorite genres--but I think I have a couple of them recorded.

As for Ryan noir, I recommend The Set-Up, Crossfire, and Odds Against Tomorrow

Sound selection of Ryan noirs but if someone disliked Ryan because of  the character he played in Battle of the Bulge,   they most likely wouldn't be fond on him in Crossfire and Odds Against Tomorrow.      Instead,  along with The Set-Up one might prefer Berlin Express.   

As for a Ryan noir where he plays a very nasty character I highly recommend The Racket;   Like a lot of films Ryan steals the film from stars Robert Mitchum and Lizabeth Scott.     (and William Talman gives the second most compelling performance).

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And after you watch Robert Ryan in The Racket seek out the silent version with Louis Wolheim.

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23 minutes ago, Fedya said:

I think the nastiness works in Detour in a way that it doesn't work in a lot of movies, especially non-noirs.  These are all desperate people (well, mostly Ann Savage), and that despration shines through.  There's a similar unrelenting nastiness in Caged that works well, and has an effect on the Eleanor Parker character.

I'm aware that I am in the minority here when it comes to Detour. I suppose it all comes down to, as has been said innumerable times here and elsewhere, one's own subjective response to a film.  There are a lot of movies with "nasty" characters that I like. But there's something so dismal and dreary about Detour. I know noirs are supposed to be kind of dark, and I don't have a problem with that, in fact it's one of the reasons I like them. But for me they also have to have something interesting going on with the characters. Both the characters in Detour,  but especially Ann Savage's (such an appropriate name !) are not only unpleasant, they're not especially interesting in any way to me. We don't get anything to go on as to why Vera is so  horrible. She's just a vicious harpy from hell.  Her meanness isn't even fun -- sometimes mean characters in noir are so jaw-droppingly wicked, they're kind of fun to watch. But Vera isn't just nasty, she's kind of dull.  And Tom Neal's character isn't much better.

Most noirs have at some point a bit of wit or they're funny in some other way. Or they have a fun nightclub scene, or a bit of good music. Or even just beautiful noirish visuals...lovely rain-swept streets and dark urban corners. Something that's pleasing in some way, noir or not. But  for me Detour is just a gruelling slog from beginning to end. It doesn't even leave the viewer with much to muse about. Other than never pick up bad-tempered hitch-hikers.

Oh, there's one good thing about it. I do like that song, "I Can't Believe that You're in Love with Me". And Al should not have believed it, since his chantoosey girlfriend was clearly giving him the brush-off.

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49 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I assume you really hate Dan Duryea.       I'm cracking wise here and I see you put a happy face at the end of your post.

The point being that if one likes or dislikes an actor based on the roles they play (verses their acting chops),   Duryea would be one of the most disliked actors of studio era movies.

 

I’ve stopped looking at actors in that way. Mitchum’s performance in Cape Fear is one of my all-time favorite performances and that role is about as sleazy and nasty as it gets. 

 

47 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Sound selection of Ryan noirs but if someone disliked Ryan because of  the character he played in Battle of the Bulge,   they most likely wouldn't be fond on him in Crossfire and Odds Against Tomorrow.      Instead,  along with The Set-Up one might prefer Berlin Express.   

As for a Ryan noir where he plays a very nasty character I highly recommend The Racket;   Like a lot of films Ryan steals the film from stars Robert Mitchum and Lizabeth Scott.     (and William Talman gives the second most compelling performance).

I’ll have to find a copy of The Racket to watch, because I love Talman in The Hitch-Hiker and Armored Car Robbery. 

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2 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

I'm aware that I am in the minority here when it comes to Detour. I suppose it all comes down to, as has been said innumerable times here and elsewhere, one's own subjective response to a film.  There are a lot of movies with "nasty" characters that I like. But there's something so dismal and dreary about Detour. I know noirs are supposed to be kind of dark, and I don't have a problem with that, in fact it's one of the reasons I like them. But for me they also have to have something interesting going on with the characters. Both the characters in Detour,  but especially Ann Savage's (such an appropriate name !) are not only unpleasant, they're not especially interesting in any way to me. We don't get anything to go on as to why Vera is so  horrible. She's just a vicious harpy from hell.  Her meanness isn't even fun -- sometimes mean characters in noir are so jaw-droppingly wicked, they're kind of fun to watch. But Vera isn't just nasty, she's kind of dull.  And Tom Neal's character isn't much better.

Most noirs have at some point a bit of wit or they're funny in some other way. Or they have a fun nightclub scene, or a bit of good music. Or even just beautiful noirish visuals...lovely rain-swept streets and dark urban corners. Something that's pleasing in some way, noir or not. But  for me Detour is just a gruelling slog from beginning to end. It doesn't even leave the viewer with much to muse about. Other than never pick up bad-tempered hitch-hikers.

Oh, there's one good thing about it. I do like that song, "I Can't Believe that You're in Love with Me". And Al should not have believed it, since his chantoosey girlfriend was clearly giving him the brush-off.

MissW, I'm not terribly fond of Detour either, though I like the performances and some of the directorial touches. Is this partly because I was expecting a GREAT film, whereas earlier viewers who were expecting nothing found a lot more? I also think that 1) the set-up is much too long for such a short film; it's uninteresting until Tom Neal hits the road, and really, until Ann Savage shows up: and 2) the big "I'm not going to let you out of this room" scene goes on and on; and 3) the method by which someone dies is not very believable, though this is the least of the three problems. So at a two and half stars out of four level Detour is fine, but not much more than that.

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House By The River (1950)

A minor but still intriguing Gothic thriller from director Fritz Lang, for many years a rare film of his to find.

A frustrated writer accidentally strangles his house maid when he tries to muffle her cries after making a drunken pass at her. He then gets his brother, used to bailing him out of problems, to help him discard her body in a river that runs behind his home. The brother becomes moody and withdrawn from guilt after the act while the writer, by contrast, becomes giddy from the publicity surrounding the maid's disappearance as it helps the sale of his books. But a river has ways of giving up its secrets as the estrangement between the two brothers grows.

Lang's career was on a downward swing when this economy thriller was made, having just received negative reviews for his previous release, Secret Beyond the Door, and now having to settle to making this production at Republic Studios, a far cry from the major Hollywood studios where he had worked during the previous 15 years. There's little suspense here as we know who the killer is. Nor is the cast really top tier.

However, the acting is, at least, adequate, and there's a certain interest in watching the serpentine machinations of the writer's self serving mind at work here. This is particularly true with the casting of Louis Hayward in the lead role. Hayward has never been one of my favourites but he's rather effective here in a duplicitous creepy role as a man who works hard at trying to appear normal to the outside world though, as the film proceeds, it is apparent that his mind is becoming increasingly twisted.

There's a scene early in the film in which Hayward agrees to let the maid (pretty Dorothy Patrick) use the upstairs bathroom to have a bath. He is writing in his backyard at the time and as he approaches his house, glancing up at the bathroom window with a smile, he hears the flush of the bath water as it cascades down the pipe outside the house. The leering look on Hayward's face as he hears the water then glances upward at the bathroom window is all you have to see to know the licentiousness that exists within his mind.

Lee Bowman is effectively cast as Hayward's conscious stricken brother, while Jane Wyatt plays his wife. Jody Gilbert (memorable to comedy fans as a hard-as-nails diner waitress clashing with W. C. Fields in Never Give A Sucker An Even Break) has a contrasting fun part here as Bowman's maid who pokes her nose into his life, much to his annoyance and consternation. Visually the black and white photography of this Lang film often takes on a noir look.

house-by-the-river-1.jpg?fit=1024,675&ss

2.5 out of 4

 

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On 1/18/2020 at 12:36 PM, misswonderly3 said:

So did anyone watch Whiskey Galore last night? 

Caught the beginning to about a 3rd through.

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15 hours ago, Fedya said:

She thought turkeys could fly?

Of course turkeys can fly.

 

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19 hours ago, TomJH said:

Of course the film has also long been a source of controversy for its false depiction and stereotyping of slaves

I dunno, you described Prissy as simple minded, Mammy as wise. Polk was a house servant, lost without Tara, big Sam the strong farm manager & protector.

Then you have Scarlett who's silly then strong, Melanie & Ashley who are also lost without their plantation, Rhett who's the opportunist, Belle Watling the town tart.

Seems as though they're just CHARACTORS. 

19 hours ago, TomJH said:

"I don't know nothing about birthing no babies"

If anyone thinks that's negative stereotyping language, I'll tell you 90% of my school kids speak using double negatives because their parents do.

 

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3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I dunno, you described Prissy as simple minded, Mammy as wise. Polk was a house servant, lost without Tara, big Sam the strong farm manager & protector.

Then you have Scarlett who's silly then strong, Melanie & Ashley who are also lost without their plantation, Rhett who's the opportunist, Belle Watling the town tart.

Seems as though they're just CHARACTORS. 

If anyone thinks that's negative stereotyping language, I'll tell you 90% of my school kids speak using double negatives because their parents do.

 

Protests from black organizations over GWTW's portrayal of blacks as demeaning virtually go back to the film's openings around the U.S.. The Washington D.C. chapter of the National Negro Congress picketed outside the Lincoln Theater's presentation of the film in March, 1940, for example. And the controversy over the film's racism (even if it might be considered gentle by some) has continued to this day. Prissy's simple minded "d a r k i e," in particular, many find hard to stomach since it fits so many bigots' ideas of the low intelligence of many black people.

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The language that I cited from Prissy was used to identify the birthing scene. It wasn't thinking of the double negatives as being racial stereotyping, per se, since, as you pointed out, TikiSoo, many people of many races are inclined to speak that way.

By the way I think the way Hattie McDaniel plays her role Mammy is a real character in the film, but we mustn't let the humour and charm of the actress's portrayal blind us to the fact that Mammy remains perfectly content to stay with the O'Haras after the Civil War. To many black viewers, I'm sure, Mammy is portrayed like a "good one," who loved and needed the whites, almost like a big pet. Strong as Mammy appeared to be prior to the war, her mind is too "simple" to run a plantation on her own afterward. She needs the strength and intelligence of Scarlett to be there in order to survive. Yes, it's a very patronizing portrait. I can fully understand why it offends many, keeping in mind, too, that Mammy comes off the best of the black portrayals in GWTW.

But people take from a film what they choose to take from it. I had a black friend, who had been through some very hard times, staying at my place for a while, and one evening she watched GWTW on TCM. She enjoyed it very much and I can't even recall her making any reference to the black portrayals in the film. What she commented upon was the inspiration that Scarlett O'Hara gave her as a survivor.

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