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INTERIORS (1978) on TCM - a depressing WOODY ALLEN film (written / directed by, no appearance) with remarkable performances from DIANE KEATON  GERALDINE PAGE  E.G. MARSHALL MAUREEN STAPLETON ...more... fascinating downer.  I haven't watched a movie I can remember with so many selfish characters. 

 

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The Two Mrs. Carrolls Poster

The Two Mrs Carrolls (1947) TCM on demand 5/10

A woman falls in love with an artist and marries him after his wife dies.

A first time viewing for me, it was a bit disappointing. The two legends Humphrey Bogart and Barbara Stanwyck co star here for the only time but the film lacks tension. Bogart is very sedate for most of the film but goes full psycho at the the end. The supporting cast is enjoyable, Ann Carter (The Curse Of The Cat People) is good as Bogart's precocious daughter, Nigel Bruce is his funny bumbling self as a tipsy town doctor and Anita Sharp-Bolster steals some scenes as a dry witted housekeeper.

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11 hours ago, Swithin said:

I watched Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935) on TCM last night, a film I like very much and haven't seen for years. It occurred to me that the young leads (Gary Cooper, Franchot Tone, Richard Cromwell) had purely American accents, with no attempt whatsoever to try to affect British accents. The older officers -- Guy Standing, C. Aubrey Smith, Lumsden Hare -- all had good British accents. Perhaps in that regiment one's accent doesn't mature until one is older? 

Anyhow, the three leads got to wear all sorts of wonderful drag. The costume designer, Travis Banton,  must have had a field day! 

release-date-was-feb-15-1935-film-title-

 

 

I love Lives of a Bengal Lancer, as well. It may be dated in its sensitivities towards natives falling under imperial British rule but it is full of atmosphere, has some great action at the end and there's also a fair amount of humour to be found in the antagonistic relationship between fellow officers Gary Cooper and Franchot Tone. Cooper is terrific in this film (manly yet humane) and I think this may well be my favourite performance of Tone. By the way, Cooper's character, McGregor, is identified as Scotch Canadian and coming from Canada (Alberta, I believe), thus his lack of a British accent.

This film's box office success lead to a number of other British Empire epics being produced in Hollywood, including Warners Charge of the Light Brigade, Paramount's The Last Outpost and RKO's Gunga Din.

 

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3 minutes ago, TomJH said:

By the way, Cooper's character, McGregor, is identified as Scotch Canadian and coming from Canada (Alberta, I believe), thus his lack of a British accent.

This film's box office success lead to a number of other British Empire epics being produced in Hollywood, including Warners Charge of the Light Brigade, Paramount's The Last Outpost and RKO's Gunga Din.

 

Yes, you're right, I had forgotten that, as I didn't watch all of the film this time, though I do now remember references to Canada. Speaking of accents, Akim Tamiroff's Armenian/Russian accent came in handy, as always, for his role as the Emir. And he got to wear some nice drag, too.

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I watched "A Death In Buenos Aires", an Argentinian film from 2014.  The version I watched wasn't sub-titled, but thanks to the close-captioning function, I could follow along.  There was a time when foreign films were tough for me to follow, but I've been exposed to a lot of foreign films on my Roku system lately, and I don't mind reading dialog anymore.  This movie was a cop-thriller-mystery type of picture.  It opens with the shot of a middle-aged man lying in bed in a pool of blood and a young police officer sitting on the corner of the man's bed.  The young officer is the first one on the scene of the crime and is waiting for the detectives to arrive so they can start their investigation.

The deceased man happens to be the last of two heirs from a prominent, old-moneyed Argentine family.  He also happens to be (have been) gay.  The detectives are encouraged and in some cases bribed to quickly wrap up the investigation so the remaining heiress (the dead man's sister) won't have to endure the shame and humiliation of a lengthy process from the arrest to the conviction of the man's killer.  The lead investigator is named Chavez, and he thinks the young cop has compromised the crime scene prior to the arrival of the detectives.  He is additionally hacked off when he learns the young cop has put in for a transfer to go from his beat to the investigatory team of the murder, and his request has been granted.  Chavez eventually takes a shine to the kid after he engages in an under-cover detail that apparently nabs the prime suspect in the case.

But are things in this movie really as they seem?  The young cop looks at Chavez longingly.  Is the guy bi-curious?  Does he see Chavez as a mentor or as a potential lover, or both?  This film had some really neat twists and turns in it prior to hitting the climax, and I was captivated from start to finish.  There were a couple of details from the film that I found unnecessary, like one of Chavez' partners on the investigating team was a woman, and he and she engaged in a hot sexual scene in his car outside the police station.  Prior to the sex act, there was never a hint that either of them had the hots for each other.  Chavez was married and presumably, the marriage wasn't on the rocks.  I think they could have at least added a scene where the two were flirting with each other or engaged in an awkward make-out session instead of just showing the two getting it on in the front seat of his car.  The female cop, while not on a vice-squad detail, was dressed like a hooker in just about every scene she was in!  Then again, this movie, while only 6 years old, was set during the 1980's, so maybe that's how some female cops in large Argentinian cities dressed for work?  Anyway, it was a fine picture, and I'd easily give it an 8 out of 10.

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7 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

The Two Mrs. Carrolls Poster

The Two Mrs Carrolls (1947) TCM on demand 5/10

A woman falls in love with an artist and marries him after his wife dies.

A first time viewing for me, it was a bit disappointing. The two legends Humphrey Bogart and Barbara Stanwyck co star here for the only time but the film lacks tension. Bogart is very sedate for most of the film but goes full psycho at the the end. The supporting cast is enjoyable, Ann Carter (The Curse Of The Cat People) is good as Bogart's precocious daughter, Nigel Bruce is his funny bumbling self as a tipsy town doctor and Anita Sharp-Bolster steals some scenes as a dry witted housekeeper.

it's a TERRIBLE SHAME this one doesn't work, because STANWYCK and BOGART has ALL TIME POTENTIAL just as BOGART and HEPBURN (KATHARINE) did.

But the souffle don't rise on this one and I don't know who to blame other than The Director.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

it's a TERRIBLE SHAME this one doesn't work, because STANWYCK and BOGART has ALL TIME POTENTIAL just as BOGART and HEPBURN (KATHARINE) did.

But the souffle don't rise on this one and I don't know who to blame other than The Director.

I agree Lorna. and Det. Jim. I've seen the film many times and haven't changed my mind. It's not a favorite of mine. It's so disappointing since Stanwyck is my favorite actress. That shrug that Bogart does at the end coming down the stairs is ridiculous. The cast is great, for me, the film isn't.

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17 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

INTERIORS (1978) on TCM - a depressing WOODY ALLEN film (written / directed by, no appearance) with remarkable performances from DIANE KEATON  GERALDINE PAGE  E.G. MARSHALL MAUREEN STAPLETON ...more... fascinating downer.  I haven't watched a movie I can remember with so many selfish characters. 

 

Selfish, self-absorbed, and all with the personality of a wet noodle, living in bland surroundings and wearing bland clothes.  I know it was the late 70s and beige was the thing, but as Pearl said, describing the beach house, "it's kinda pale."  Even their ocean view is bland and depressing!  The only life and color in that little group was Maureen Stapleton's character (Pearl), and they act as if she arrived from another planet.  I like the film - I just have a hard time being sympathetic, except for Geraldine Page's character, Eve.

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1 hour ago, txfilmfan said:

Selfish, self-absorbed, and all with the personality of a wet noodle, living in bland surroundings and wearing bland clothes.  I know it was the late 70s and beige was the thing, but as Pearl said, describing the beach house, "it's kinda pale."  Even their ocean view is bland and depressing!  The only life and color in that little group was Maureen Stapleton's character (Pearl), and they act as if she arrived from another planet.  I like the film - I just have a hard time being sympathetic, except for Geraldine Page's character, Eve.

I think I like it too, but NONE of the characters except MAUREEN STAPLETON

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1 minute ago, Allhallowsday said:

I think I like it too, but NONE of the characters except MAUREEN STAPLETON

Same here.  Her character, Pearl, performs an act of ultimate goodness for Mary Beth Hurt's character (Joey), but I seriously doubt Joey would return the favor if the situation was reversed. 

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1 minute ago, txfilmfan said:

Same here.  Her character, Pearl, performs an act of ultimate goodness for Mary Beth Hurt's character (Joey), but I seriously doubt Joey would return the favor if the situation was reversed. 

It's interesting how the only two "savers" in the group are Joey's boyfriend Mike (SAM WATERSTON) and Pearl (MAUREEN STAPLETON).  While they are saving Joey on the beach, we see her father and sisters sleeping.  Even Renata's boyfriend fails at rape, a failure all round (thank goodness).  Joey fails at saving her mother.  Definitely interesting character studies.  A film I could look at again for the character studies, all wonderful performances though mostly unlikable people! 

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

it's a TERRIBLE SHAME this one doesn't work, because STANWYCK and BOGART has ALL TIME POTENTIAL just as BOGART and HEPBURN (KATHARINE) did.

But the souffle don't rise on this one and I don't know who to blame other than The Director.

I thought the concept of this film was interesting.  Bogart basically uses his wives as a muse for his work and when he's done, he moves onto another woman.  I actually liked it for the most part.  I had to suspend belief that Stanwyck would be waiting in the wings for two years after finding out her beau was married.  I just imagine that conversation: "Hey my invalid wife died. We can get married now." 

I actually found the weakest part of the film to be the daughter.  Why was she the only person in the family to have an affected British accent? I also thought that she was rather patronizing for a child.

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12 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I thought the concept of this film was interesting.  Bogart basically uses his wives as a muse for his work and when he's done, he moves onto another woman.  I actually liked it for the most part.  I had to suspend belief that Stanwyck would be waiting in the wings for two years after finding out her beau was married.  I just imagine that conversation: "Hey my invalid wife died. We can get married now."

Yours always,

Claus von Bülow

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18 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

Selfish, self-absorbed, and all with the personality of a wet noodle, living in bland surroundings and wearing bland clothes.  I know it was the late 70s and beige was the thing, but as Pearl said, describing the beach house, "it's kinda pale."  Even their ocean view is bland and depressing!  The only life and color in that little group was Maureen Stapleton's character (Pearl), and they act as if she arrived from another planet.  I like the film - I just have a hard time being sympathetic, except for Geraldine Page's character, Eve.

That's the whole point.  All the characters, the supposedly educated, sophisticated, "genteel" people  ---all members of the same family--are so decorous and cerebral, they have no life, no colour, no joy. They're supposed to be "pale", both literally and metaphorically. The only one who seems able to be honest about his emotions is the father (excellently played by the veteran actor E.G. Marshall.)

I'm surprised you liked the Geraldine Page character the most. (Poor Geraldine Page, she so often seemed to be cast as a desperate depressed needy woman.)  Yes, how can the audience not feel sorry for her?  She's a very sad person. But she's also a very self-centred and intolerant person. Most of all - and this is what makes her so pitiable - she's a person who doesn't know how to enjoy life.  Everything has to be so ordered, so perfect, there's no room left for spontaneity or the kind of messiness that is simply part of living. No wonder she cracks up. So yes, I do feel very sorry for her; but I don't "like" her. I like Pearl.

Of course there's no "colour" and everything is beige. These are beige people.  The Maureen Stapleton character, you'll notice, is always dressed in colourful clothes, she expresses herself colourfully--down-to-earth, no b.s., says what she thinks without a lot of angsty intellectualizing. She's the most likable character in the movie, and that's no accident. 

It's also no accident that it's Pearl (Maureen Stapleton's character)  who rescues Joey from drowning. She saves her life. She's the only one who has that kind of knowledge, the ability to resuscitate someone from near death. Pearl represents the life-force in a family that seems to be paralyzed by depression and a fear of expressing any kind of liveliness or joy.

 

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On 2/5/2020 at 3:04 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

 

THE 39 STEPS (1935) *Score: 2.5/5

Starring: Robert Donat, Madeleine Carroll, Lucie Mannheim, Godfrey Tearle, Peggy Ashcroft, John Laurie, Helen Haye. 

I really didn't enjoy this upon rewatching it. I remember liking it back in high school, but I was terribly bored this second time. 

Really ?  I love The 39 Steps. It's one of my favourite early Hitchocock films. Not boring at all, I find it extremely exciting and suspenseful. There are so many memorable scenes, some touching, many funny. What about the part where Robert Donat's character is seeking refuge in that remote Scottish farm house, the way the young wife is attracted to him and wants to help him?  Or the bit where he accidentally gets caught up at a political candidate's meeting and is mistaken for one of the actual candidates? He gives such a stirring speech, way better than any of the real politicians'  speeches !  And everyone in the audience cheers him, even when they see him being led out in handcuffs.

Then there are the scenes in which Donat and the lovely Madeleine Carroll are handcuffed together in the bedroom of that little inn. It's so funny and sexy and sweet.

I'm sorry you didn't like it. Hope I didn't seem aggressive in my defense of it, guess I was just really surprised that such a fun little movie didn't do anything for you.

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On 2/8/2020 at 12:46 AM, Allhallowsday said:

INTERIORS (1978) on TCM - a depressing WOODY ALLEN film (written / directed by, no appearance) with remarkable performances from DIANE KEATON  GERALDINE PAGE  E.G. MARSHALL MAUREEN STAPLETON ...more... fascinating downer.  I haven't watched a movie I can remember with so many selfish characters. 

The first, IIRC, of Woody's 80's campaign to plagiarize-remake all of his favorite Ingmar Bergman films, later followed by his favorite Fellini films (Stardust Memories, Radio Days), and Russian authors (Crimes and Misdemeanors, Hannah & Her Sisters).  

We just didn't know that back then, or how low he would sink--Remember when we kept looking for "Shakespeare" parallels in A Midsummer Night Sex Comedy, with all of its smiles on summer nights?

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6 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

Really ?  I love The 39 Steps. It's one of my favourite early Hitchocock films. Not boring at all, I find it extremely exciting and suspenseful. There are so many memorable scenes, some touching, many funny. What about the part where Robert Donat's character is seeking refuge in that remote Scottish farm house, the way the young wife is attracted to him and wants to help him?  Or the bit where he accidentally gets caught up at a political candidate's meeting and is mistaken for one of the actual candidates? He gives such a stirring speech, way better than any of the real politicians'  speeches !  And everyone in the audience cheers him, even when they see him being led out in handcuffs.

Then there are the scenes in which Donat and the lovely Madeleine Carroll are handcuffed together in the bedroom of that little inn. It's so funny and sexy and sweet.

I'm sorry you didn't like it. Hope I didn't seem aggressive in my defense of it, guess I was just really surprised that such a fun little movie didn't do anything for you.

It's all good. If you like it, you like it. Film taste is extremely subjective. It just didn't do anything for me this second time around. 

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17 hours ago, NickAndNora34 said:

It's all good. If you like it, you like it. Film taste is extremely subjective. It just didn't do anything for me this second time around. 

Very true.  I happen to love "The 39 Steps" and "The Lady Vanishes", which were the earliest Hitchcock films I remember watching.  As for "The Man Who Knew Too Much", I much rather prefer the Jimmy Stewart-Doris Day picture as opposed to the 1930's version.  One thing I have to guard against is having a pre-conceived notion about a film I haven't seen, but have heard about whether it's gotten glowing or scathing reviews.  Sometimes that can prejudice my opinion without giving the film a fair chance.  That means I can like something that's been panned since I don't think it's that bad, or if a film receives tons of accolades which causes me to react with shrugged shoulders and think, "What's the big deal about this picture?".

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On 2/8/2020 at 4:44 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

it's a TERRIBLE SHAME this one doesn't work, because STANWYCK and BOGART has ALL TIME POTENTIAL just as BOGART and HEPBURN (KATHARINE) did.

But the souffle don't rise on this one and I don't know who to blame other than The Director.

Yeah, it's a shame that their only pairing turned out to be a DUD!

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41 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Yeah, it's a shame that their only pairing turned out to be a DUD!

I feel the same way about Dustin Hoffman and Warren Beatty in ISHTAR.

Such star power, yet the film IMO really stunk to high heaven.

I know Hoffman had a small part as Mumbles in DICK TRACY, but there were maybe only 2 or 3 scenes between him and Beatty in there.

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21 hours ago, EricJ said:

The first, IIRC, of Woody's 80's campaign to plagiarize-remake all of his favorite Ingmar Bergman films, later followed by his favorite Fellini films (Stardust Memories, Radio Days), and Russian authors (Crimes and Misdemeanors, Hannah & Her Sisters).  

We just didn't know that back then, or how low he would sink--Remember when we kept looking for "Shakespeare" parallels in A Midsummer Night Sex Comedy, with all of its smiles on summer nights?

You just don't get it. He's not "plagiarizing" those directors' works, he's paying homage to them. The Woody Allen movies are different enough from Bergman and Fellini's films to stand on their own, yet anyone who's seen the earlier works from those masters will recognize Allen's allusions to them and appreciate them.

As for "Midsummer Night's Sex Comedy", yes, there are tons of references in the film to both Shakepeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream" and Ingmar Bergman's "Smiles of a Summer Night".   So what? It's fun for people familiar with both those narratives to pick out the allusions to them. At the same time, the story itself is both similar to them and yet different enough that it stands on its own.

Lighten up...you must be one of the most judgmental posters on these boards. I've noticed that anything a filmmaker does that's referential to previous, older, classic movies you regard as disrespectful or derivative  (I remember your disparaging the Coen brothers for similar reasons.)  There is such a thing as sincere "homage" to past directors; this does not necessarily make the one paying homage a plagiarizer or a satirist.  I personally always enjoy spotting these allusions to earlier classic films (or to writers such as Shakespeare, for that matter).  It's just a fun thing to do.
 

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Anna Christie (1930) with Great Garbo

I loved this film and it’s probably now in my top 5 favorite pre-codes. When Garbo walks through the door in her first scene, I actually said to myself, “Wow, that’s Greta Garbo!” I thought her performance was good for an early talkie, but Marion, Bickford, and Dressler were a step above her.

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james, I cannot ascertain if you agree with my comments to Mr. Eric or not.  Since they were not intended to be funny, I have to assume you do not.  Would you mind explaining your own take on the Woody Allen films in question and how you feel about his supposed "plagiarizing" or homage, depending on one's point of view?

( I have to say, that "laughing" emoticon can be taken any number of ways...it's not one of my favourite of the emoji options they give us here, so much room for misinterpretation.)

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2 hours ago, misswonderly3 said:

james, I cannot ascertain if you agree with my comments to Mr. Eric or not.  Since they were not intended to be funny, I have to assume you do not.  Would you mind explaining your own take on the Woody Allen films in question and how you feel about his supposed "plagiarizing" or homage, depending on one's point of view?

( I have to say, that "laughing" emoticon can be taken any number of ways...it's not one of my favourite of the emoji options they give us here, so much room for misinterpretation.)

Woody pays homage to other filmmakers by sometimes plagiarizing some of their work.      

 

 

 

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