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speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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1 minute ago, Hibi said:

Yes. Maybe 15 or so years ago.

Alexis Smith was SOTM in May 2000.    

image.jpeg.3d549537d512afc9bcff8f09fe3bce03.jpeg

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Not sure how well this will show up here, it's poor quality, but this is Alexis' show stopping number in Follies near the end of the show.

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3 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I don't want to spoil it for anyone, but were you shocked by the twists and turns starting around the midway point and the incredible ending?

Yes didn't see it coming.

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1 hour ago, laffite said:

Nothing like this could occur to me. I don't know enough about directing. I thought it was okay enough. Is there anything to be said for its apparent simplicity, as is? Just wondering. The problem (if there is a problem) with accents doesn't hit my radar. I don't expect that kind of precision with Hollywood movies.

Correct me if I missed something but it did not seem so immediately clear to me that there was anything wrong with Mr Carroll. And I was looking for something, since our own Mr Manko laid this execrable spoiler regarding Mr Carroll and his mental state. Going so far as telling us THAT HE WAS A MAN WHO MARRIED WOMEN AND THEN MURDERED THEM or something like that. I don't think the viewer should know that, going in (especially since there are only two wives).  Mank should be ashamed for allowing himself to say that.  There may have been tell-tale signs of the unhinged (re Bogie) but I didn't really become aware of that until the very end where Bogart really surprised me with his acting. The gradual awareness of the painting(s) was suggestive, and there may have been other signs but I thought Mr Carroll's general comportment not so off the wall throughtout.. If I am not being perceptive enough about that then I would say, tentatively, that Bogie might have given us more (or Maybe Mankie baby corrupted my mind with his assertions).

 

elsa-lanchester.jpg MUTE BUTTON MANKIEWICZ is what I call him  and that's what he is!

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I rarely listen to intros as they often reveal too much plot detail. (if I haven't seen the film).

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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

WARNER BROS movies of the 1940's are a REAL FAVORITE OF MINE, and yet, while the LATE forties yielded a lot of great films for them, they started optioning a lot of second rate stories and books and there are, of course, some REAL MISSTEPS from the time, ie THE FOUNTAINHEAD.

The Fountainhead had me hooting and laughing at the screen, something I am rarely known to do with any drama (even ones that were much panned)

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4 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

The Fountainhead had me hooting and laughing at the screen, something I am rarely known to do with any drama (even ones that were much panned)

I think my favorite part is when PATRICIA NEAL Throws the bronze statuette out of her 27th story apartment window because it was too perfect and perfection disgusts her.
 

hope she has an ugly cat.

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1 minute ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I think my favorite part is when PATRICIA NEAL Throws the bronze statuette out of her 27th story apartment window because it was too perfect and perfection disgusts her.
 

hope she has an ugly cat.

I just about lost it during the sheer Freudian silliness of Patricia neal watching Gary Cooper use the drill on the block of marble

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Has anyone read Ayn Rand's book The Fountainhead ?  

EDIT: I wanted to know how well the movie followed the book.  Apparently my husband has read the book.  After finishing The Fountainhead, he decided he'd had enough of Ayn Rand and isn't pursuing any of her other works.

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Well Ayn Rand wrote the screenplay so I would think it's close. Haven't read it though.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I think my favorite part is when PATRICIA NEAL Throws the bronze statuette out of her 27th story apartment window because it was too perfect and perfection disgusts her.
 

hope she has an ugly cat.

I love the parts where the unwashed masses riot over architecture. LOL! As if anyone would care about some building......

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I think my favorite part is when PATRICIA NEAL Throws the bronze statuette out of her 27th story apartment window because it was too perfect and perfection disgusts her.
 

hope she has an ugly cat.

She probably killed someone on the sidewalk........Kudos to the overdramatic score by Max Steiner. Up there with his Beyond the Forest score.

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6 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

EDIT: I wanted to know how well the movie followed the book.  Apparently my husband has read the book.  After finishing The Fountainhead, he decided he'd had enough of Ayn Rand and isn't pursuing any of her other works.

I'd only watched the first two goofy conservative-made 00's movies of the Atlas Shrugged trilogy (the third got a handful of Razzie nominations), and I can see what scholars study about Rand, but she's still not my thing.

The movies kept trying to homage/invoke 00's Occupy Wall Street imagery when depicting the public rising up in protest against a government crackdown on industry...Uh, correct me if my memory is wrong, but wasn't the real OWS about how we didn't trust big business, that they weren't hardworking picked-on martyrs, and thought the government should crack down on them??

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15 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

Has anyone read Ayn Rand's book The Fountainhead ?  

Ugh I read it. It was long, rambling and preachy.

My biggest issue was Roarke's inability to make the customer happy with his design. We all have clients that want something particular...it's your job as an artist to design something that is fully functional & satisfies the customer while maintaining your personal philosophy. Man up! Believe me, even a restoration artist faces artistic/philosophical challenges with every assignment. 

A man I had just started dating bought me The Fountainhead and said, "This book reflects my life philosophy". I should have broken up with him then. 

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15 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

I just about lost it during the sheer Freudian silliness of Patricia neal watching Gary Cooper use the drill on the block of marble

You and MOLLY HASKELL.

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National Velvet Poster

National Velvet (1945) TCM On Demand 6/10

In 1920s England, a young girl yearns to have her horse ride in the Grand National Steeplechase.

 

First time viewing for me, I liked it, I thought it was a bit slow going but the scenes at the Grand National were great. The cast was very good. Mickey Rooney is given top billing but he is really a supporting character. Elizabeth Taylor is wonderful in a role that would make her a star, I had read this was her own favorite of all her movies. Angela Lansbury plays her older sister and she looks gorgeous. It was also interesting seeing the height difference between the two as Lansbury towers over Taylor.  Donald Crisp plays another of his seemingly strict but really soft hearted father roles. Ann Revere won an Oscar as Taylor's loving mother. Her best scene is a touching one where she talks about her past dreams and encourages daughter Taylor to follow hers.

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9 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

National Velvet Poster

National Velvet (1945) TCM On Demand 6/10

In 1920s England, a young girl yearns to have her horse ride in the Grand National Steeplechase.

 

First time viewing for me, I liked it, I thought it was a bit slow going but the scenes at the Grand National were great. The cast was very good. Mickey Rooney is given top billing but he is really a supporting character. Elizabeth Taylor is wonderful in a role that would make her a star, I had read this was her own favorite of all her movies. Angela Lansbury plays her older sister and she looks gorgeous. It was also interesting seeing the height difference between the two as Lansbury towers over Taylor.  Donald Crisp plays another of his seemingly strict but really soft hearted father roles. Ann Revere won an Oscar as Taylor's loving mother. Her best scene is a touching one where she talks about her past dreams and encourages daughter Taylor to follow hers.

I love this movie and can easily understand why it's Elizabeth's favorite among her films. She is so adorable and full of life as the optimistic Velvet, determined to take her horse Pie to the heights of glory.

Anne Revere more than deserved her Oscar for Best Supporting Actress that year. Mrs. Brown is so full of warmth, support and encouragement, she's the kind of ma anyone would want.

And even though Mr. Brown (Donald Crisp) is not as encouraging as Mrs. Brown when it comes to Velvet and her horse, and gets a little carried away after the race is over, he shows he actually is a decent man who loves and cares for his family very much.

Though I admit I am not the biggest Mickey Rooney fan by any means, I have to say he was very convincing as Mi Taylor, the young lad at first anxious to make an easy buck through theft, but he comes to care for Velvet and the rest of the Brown family and grows a bond with Velvet throughout the movie so much that he comes to share Velvet's dream to make a champion out of Pie.

I give the movie 9/10. But I have to admit I am a sucker for any movie where the horse plays an important part in the story. I love horses.

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Ugh I read it. It was long, rambling and preachy.

My biggest issue was Roarke's inability to make the customer happy with his design. We all have clients that want something particular...it's your job as an artist to design something that is fully functional & satisfies the customer while maintaining your personal philosophy. Man up! Believe me, even a restoration artist faces artistic/philosophical challenges with every assignment. 

A man I had just started dating bought me The Fountainhead and said, "This book reflects my life philosophy". I should have broken up with him then. 

Yeah. My husband read it and I asked him if he was going to read Atlas Shrugged and he goes "no.  I've had enough Ayn Rand." Lol.

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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

You and MOLLY HASKELL.

I have The Fountainhead on the DVR.  I really look forward to watching it after reading it being ripped to shreds here on the boards. I think I'm going to wait until my husband is home for the evening.  He can tell me how closely it follows the book.

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1 minute ago, Hibi said:

It's VERY entertaining!

now that I've seen BEYOND THE FOREST, I understand what aN IMPRESSIVE ONE-TWO PUNCH 1949 was for KING VIDOR.

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