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1 hour ago, misswonderly3 said:

"I'm  little disappointed you chose to not respond to my response to your critique of my comments on The Fountainhead, MissW, but that's your prerogative."

Tom, I'm sorry I did not respond to your earlier post about The Fountainhead  Given how well you defended it (this is in your previous post, not even talking about the more recent one), and how much you like it, it was rude of me to not reply.  

What I appreciate about your posts in general, and certainly about the ones you've written about The Fountainhead  is, you don't just say, "Well, I disagree with the majority here, I like the film."  It's easy to do that. But you explain, in careful detail, why you like it, and why you think it deserves more respect than it generally gets.

I think one poster here - it might have been Lorna, not sure - said, whatever its faults, The Fountainhead is entertaining. But I think they meant in an "it's so bad it's good" way, whereas you make a case for the film in many ways being good, and not in an ironic way.   So I'll "take that under advisement" and the next time TCM airs it, I'll try and watch it and give it another chance, keeping in mind the arguments you make in its favour.   (I'm pretty sure it's not "blocked" in Canada...you and I both know how frustrating that can be.)

As for my not responding to your earlier post about it,  it's simply because I don't think I come to the boards as much as many here do. I did read your defence of the film, and as I said, I should have replied. But I just don't spend as much time on these boards as some do.  This is largely because if I do, all of a sudden a couple of hours can go by, hours that I'd intended to spend doing something else.  So my discourtesy in not answering you before was not because I didn't think your points were valid, it's just that I didn't want to get into a long discussion, simply because of the time it would take.  (In fact, usually, I only check out about 3 threads on these boards, this being one of them.)

I appreciative your flexibility on the subject, MissW, to give The Fountainhead another opportunity some time. You may not change your opinion about the film, in the final analysis but, at least, you're willing to give it a try. That says something about you. The fact that we may have differing opinions about this film is a trivial matter, by comparison.

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Last night I watched 1947's REPEAT PERFORMANCE - a TCM Noir Alley recording paired with Criss Cross which I'll watch next.

I really enjoyed Eddie Muller's intro- he described this movie a fantasy like a "dark It's A Wonderful Life" which really appealed to me. I really enjoyed Mullers intro/outro and very much appreciated his classy retro clothing stylings. (Robert Osborne had the best style designer)

The movie stars Joan Leslie as a woman who has just shot her husband on New Years Eve. We don't know the circumstances and the entire movie is the unraveling of the story. Instead of the typical flashback kind of story -like THE LETTER- in Repeat Performance she is actually given the chance to re-live the previous year and she attempts to change the outcome.

I can't say much more than this without disclosing the key to the story, although many of you have probably already seen this movie. It's succeeds mainly because of the fantastic performances of gorgeous Leslie, Richard Basehart as her good friend & Virginia Field as the evil "other" woman.

Eddie had hinted an element of Basehart's character couldn't be included in a '47 film because of the code but it was apparent enough the character was gay. Just goes to show a movie can get a point across without hitting us on the head.

The weakest element for me was Joan Leslie's husband played by Louis Hayward. He was over-the-top manic, cruel and certainly not attractive-I'd shoot him too. Natalie Schafer plays a cringe worthy rich cougar type pretty deftly, but that seems to be her schtick. Looking at her filmography, she was in a lot of movies - hopefully some break from the type and reveal her obvious talent.

Because the charactors are in show business, the clothing & hairstyles were gorgeous and the entire look of the film is glittery & dark at the same time. I love fantasy movies such as these especially when there are few obvious plot holes and the conclusion makes sense.

220px-Repeat_Performance_poster.jpg

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2 things RE THE FOUNTAINHEAD:

1. I think it would have been great if JACK WARNER hit himself in the head teeing golf balls in the office and demanded that JIMMY STEWART and JUNE ALLYSON be cast as the leads. Great as PAT NEAL and capable as COOPER is, I think those two could sell this bull**** better.

2. 3 things actually. RAYMOND MASSEY. I do not think THE FOUNTAINHEAD would be the TRIUMPH (of its kind) that it is without him and his performance which I just can't think of a word to describe- and that doesn't happen often.

3. One thing you MUST respect about AYN RAND is that she SOMEHOW HAD HER CONTRACT WRITTEN TO INCLUDE A CLAUSE THAT THE STUDIO  COULD NOT CHANGE ONE WORD OF DIALOGUE IN HER SCRIPT AND OH MY GOD, CAN YOU IMAGINE THE BRILLIANT TROLL YOU COULD PULL OFF WITH THIS? THAT IS GALADRIEL GETS THE RING LEVEL POWER!!!!!

ps- when she talks in that footage, does anyone else thing of GILDA RADNER'S "EMILY LITELLA" CHARACTER FROM SNL?

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Stanwyck was originally slated for the role and it was she who pressed Warners to buy it (so said she.)  When she was passed over in favor of Neal she sent Jack a telegram;  shoots daggers at Pat Neal (politely calling her Miss Patricia Neal.)

 

JACK WARNER
WARNER BROTHERS STUDIO
JUNE 21, 1948
DEAR JACK: A COUPLE OF YEARS HAVE GONE BY SINCE I MADE A FILM FOR YOU AND SINCE THEN I AM SURE YOU WILL AGREE THAT THE SCRIPTS SUBMITTED TO ME HAVE NOT COMPARED WITH "THE FOUNTAINHEAD." I READ IN THE MORNING PAPERS TODAY YOUR OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT THAT MISS PATRICIA NEAL IS GOING TO PLAY THE ROLE OF "DOMINIQUE" IN "THE FOUNTAINHEAD." AFTER ALL, JACK, IT SEEMS ODD AFTER I FOUND THE PROPERTY, BROUGHT IT TO THE ATTENTION OF THE STUDIO, HAD THE STUDIO PURCHASE THE PROPERTY, AND DURING THE PREPARATION OF THE SCREENPLAY EVERYONE ASSUMED THAT I WOULD BE IN THE PICTURE, AND NOW I FIND SOMEONE ELSE IS DEFINITELY PLAYING THE ROLE. NATURALLY, JACK, I AM BITTERLY DISAPPOINTED. HOWEVER, I CAN REALISTICALLY SEE YOUR PROBLEMS, AND CERTAINLY BASED ON ALL OF THESE CIRCUMSTANCES, IT WOULD APPEAR TO BE TO OUR MUTUAL ADVANTAGE TO TERMINATE OUR PRESENT CONTRACTUAL RELATIONSHIP. I WOULD APPRECIATE HEARING FROM YOU. KINDEST PERSONAL REGARDS.
BARBARA STANWYCK 
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Jack's response to Barbara, taking her down a few  pegs:

 

Miss Barbara Stanwyck
807 North Rodeo Drive
Beverly Hills, Calif.
June 22, 1948
Dear Barbara:
I have your telegram of the twenty-second and, while I know you brought The Fountainhead to [Henry] Blanke's attention, I want to make it very clear to you that we have a huge Story Department here in the Studio as well as in New York, that covers every book, periodical, etc.
The Fountainhead was called to the attention of our studio through the regular channels. I personally knew about it long before you suggested it to Mr. Blanke, and we were considering it for purchase and subsequently closed for it.
Naturally your interest in this property is well understood, but our studio does not confine its operations to cases where people bring in books or other stories and we buy them solely on their suggestion. It operates through regular channels, and did in this case as in most cases.
However, since our actions have offended you and you desire to terminate your contract with us, it may be that under the circumstances this would be the best thing to do.
It is with regret that I accede to your request and, if you will have your agent or attorney get in touch with our Legal Department here at the studio, the formalities of terminating your contract can be arranged. 
Kindest personal regards,
Sincerely,
Jack 
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Stanwyck would have been good but perhaps Warner thought her too old for Dominique and wanted to promote a younger face on the lot in Neal. Cooper and Stanwyck had already shown what great chemistry they had together in Ball of Fire and Meet John Doe.

And I'll tell you another thing, if Stanwyck had been cast instead, it would have saved both Cooper and Neal a lot of heart ache if they had never met.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

2 things RE THE FOUNTAINHEAD:

1. I think it would have been great if JACK WARNER hit himself in the head teeing golf balls in the office and demanded that JIMMY STEWART and JUNE ALLYSON be cast as the leads. Great as PAT NEAL and capable as COOPER is, I think those two could sell this bull**** better.

2. 3 things actually. RAYMOND MASSEY. I do not think THE FOUNTAINHEAD would be the TRIUMPH (of its kind) that it is without him and his performance which I just can't think of a word to describe- and that doesn't happen often.

3. One thing you MUST respect about AYN RAND is that she SOMEHOW HAD HER CONTRACT WRITTEN TO INCLUDE A CLAUSE THAT THE STUDIO  COULD NOT CHANGE ONE WORD OF DIALOGUE IN HER SCRIPT AND OH MY GOD, CAN YOU IMAGINE THE BRILLIANT TROLL YOU COULD PULL OFF WITH THIS? THAT IS GALADRIEL GETS THE RING LEVEL POWER!!!!!

ps- when she talks in that footage, does anyone else thing of GILDA RADNER'S "EMILY LITELLA" CHARACTER FROM SNL?

JUNE ALLYSON????? Are you kidding?????? LOL!

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1 hour ago, Roy Cronin said:

Jack's response to Barbara, taking her down a few  pegs:

 

Miss Barbara Stanwyck
807 North Rodeo Drive
Beverly Hills, Calif.
June 22, 1948
Dear Barbara:
I have your telegram of the twenty-second and, while I know you brought The Fountainhead to [Henry] Blanke's attention, I want to make it very clear to you that we have a huge Story Department here in the Studio as well as in New York, that covers every book, periodical, etc.
The Fountainhead was called to the attention of our studio through the regular channels. I personally knew about it long before you suggested it to Mr. Blanke, and we were considering it for purchase and subsequently closed for it.
Naturally your interest in this property is well understood, but our studio does not confine its operations to cases where people bring in books or other stories and we buy them solely on their suggestion. It operates through regular channels, and did in this case as in most cases.
However, since our actions have offended you and you desire to terminate your contract with us, it may be that under the circumstances this would be the best thing to do.
It is with regret that I accede to your request and, if you will have your agent or attorney get in touch with our Legal Department here at the studio, the formalities of terminating your contract can be arranged. 
Kindest personal regards,
Sincerely,
Jack 

LOL!

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15 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Stanwyck would have been good but perhaps Warner thought her too old for Dominique and wanted to promote a younger face on the lot in Neal. Cooper and Stanwyck had already shown what great chemistry they had together in Ball of Fire.

And I'll tell you another thing, if Stanwyck had been cast instead, it would have saved both Cooper and Neal a lot of heart ache if they had never met.

True!

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STANWYCK could give DOMINIQUE the INTENSITY she needed, but so could NEAL, who was ARCHITECTURAL AND STATUESQUE and more suited for the part.

Okay yeah, and 20 or so years younger too...

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5 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

STANWYCK could give DOMINIQUE the INTENSITY she needed, but so could NEAL, who was ARCHITECTURAL AND STATUESQUE and more suited for the part.

Okay yeah, and 20 or so years younger too...

STATUESQUE  is the correct word for Patricia Neal,her beauty was underrated,she caught the roving eye of Gary Cooper rapidly, with Ingrid Bergman, Patricia Neal was one of his best catches

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16 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

720full-the-fountainhead-screenshot.jpgyou know shes thinking about tossing it out the window

Or imagining what it would be like to live in a radiator.

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The price of a marriage challenging torrid affair on an actor's features:

Untitled-1.jpg

The Fountainhead, filmed in 1948 as the affair was beginning

1950-BRIGHT-LEAF-Patricia-006.jpg?width=

1950: filming Bright Leaf with Neal

high_noon_gary_cooper.jpg

1951, the year High Noon was filmed

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34 minutes ago, TomJH said:

1950-BRIGHT-LEAF-Patricia-006.jpg?width=

1950: filming Bright Leaf with Neal

Reminds me of the great Groucho exchange:

Coach: "And what are you doing with that cigar?"

Groucho: "You know another way to smoke it?"

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Behind the Door (1919) Amazon Prime

A nearly complete version is held in the Library of Congress and the Gosfilmofond in Russia, and a restored version was issued in 2016, with some still shots in place of lost footage. That version can be viewed on Amazon Prime, which is where I watched it.

A trailer and a film clip are available on YouTube:

 

 

Plot: Oscar Krug (Hobart Bosworth) returns to his hometown in Maine after being at sea for a number of years. He reminisces back to just before the war broke out, when he was in love with Alice Morse (Jane Novak), daughter of the local banker. Being German, Krug was falsely accused of being sympathetic to the enemy. He enlisted, secretly married Alice, and became Captain of a merchant marine ship. Alice came aboard the ship, which was eventually sunk by a German U-boat. Krug and Alice survived, but the German commander (Wallace Beery) took Alice aboard his vessel, leaving Oscar adrift. Krug swore to the German that he would get revenge. A few months later, Krug’s ship fired on a U-boat. Krug recognized the Captain and saved him, although the Captain did not recognize Krug. Krug plied him with liquor and pretended to be a German sympathizer, in order to discover what had happened to Alice. Krug then took his vengeance in a most horrible manner.

This is a stunning piece of work, one of the best silent films I’ve seen (and also one of the most disturbing). It begins with ordinary life in a Maine seaport, and lulls the viewer into believing this will just be another romance. The film takes a sharp turn into tragedy, and builds to a grotesque conclusion – strong stuff for any time period, let alone 1919. Bosworth, though perhaps too old for the lead (he was over 50), nevertheless is a commanding presence on screen. The sequence where he elicits the truth from Beery is alone worth the price of admission. The title refers to what happened to Beery “behind the door.”

Although the movie has clearly deteriorated in spots, the restoration for the most part is crisp. The few inserted stills do not interfere or detract in any way. At seventy minutes, the film moves briskly without any slow spots. The photography is excellent. This one deserves to be shown on TCM.

A little more information on the film (no spoilers) is provided in my “Now Playing (100 Years Ago)” thread, since the film began playing on this day in 1920, in my hometown.

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I love how aggressively polite Stanwyck and Warner were to each other in those telegram /letters.

 

 

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3 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Or imagining what it would be like to live in a radiator.

it really is ugly isn't it? like THE SQUEEZEBOX ARMS APARTMENT HOUSE model or something.

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2 hours ago, scsu1975 said:

Behind the Door (1919)

I watched this in the last couple of years, and liked it a lot. Here's what I posted at the time down in the Silents section:

Behind the Door (1919) - Bleak melodrama from producer Thomas Ince and director Irvin Willat. Hobart Bosworth stars as Captain Krug, a retired sea captain living in a small Maine town where he's opened a taxidermy shop. Alice Morse (Jane Novak) is the daughter of local banker Matthew (JP Lockney). Alice and Krug are in love, but her father wants her to marry his shady business partner Mark (Otto Hoffman). All of their romantic troubles fall by the wayside when the US enters WW1 and Krug re-enlists as a ship's captain. Also featuring James Gordon, Richard Wayne, and Wallace Beery.

The first half of this is fairly corny and conventional, but when things move out to sea, the story gets dark and darker. The final 10 minutes are genuinely unnerving, and must have had some effect on audiences of the day. Hobart, a major actor in his time, is stagey and broad. Beery is truly loathsome as a German submarine captain. The restoration of this looked good, although a small sequence was patched together with still photographs.   8/10

Source: FilmStruck

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Mr. Wong in Chinatown (1939) - Amazon Prime

w/ Boris Karloff, Marjorie Reynolds and Grant Withers (now billed third). Plus Lotus Long (in a different role from the last movie (for obvious reasons (because this is not the type of Boris Karloff movie where the dead rises))) and Richard Loo. And, down in uncredited land, Angelo Rossitto (of Freaks (1932) fame and of Dracula vs. Frankenstein (1971) not-so-much fame). And again directed by William Nigh.

A Chinese princess comes to Chinese-American detective James Lee Wong's San Francisco home for help but is murdered there by a poison dart before she even has a chance to talk with him (but still has just enough time to write an incomplete message before dying (because the prime murder victim always has just enough time to do so)). Which leads Mr. Wong to investigate her murder, the smuggling of aircraft to China (to be used in fighting an unnamed but obvious enemy) and check forgery.

I don't know about you, but I am seeing a disturbing trend here...

In Mr. Wong, Detective (1938), a chemical manufacturer comes to Mr. Wong for help and is then murdered.

Then, in The Mystery of Mr. Wong (1939), an antiques collector comes to Mr. Wong for help and is then murdered.

And, now, a Chinese princess comes to Mr. Wong for help and is then murdered.

I don't know about you but, if I was in need of a detective, I would avoid Mr. Wong like the plague! Or should I be more up-to-date and write "like the coronavirus"?

The third of six detective movies from Monogram Pictures featuring the aforementioned Mr. Wong. With Boris Karloff back in the title role and with Grant Withers back as police detective Street. Although now he is named Bill rather than Sam. And, from here going forward, with Marjorie Reynolds as Roberta "Bobbie" Logan; reporter and girlfriend to the aforementioned cop. Because Monogram Pictures is no longer content with just imitating 20th Century Fox's Charlie Chan and Mr. Moto in this series but now wants to ride on the coattails of Warner Bros. Pictures' Torchy Blane (who, probably not very coincidentally, also went to Chinatown earlier that same year).

Better than the first in the series, but not better than the second. Does this mean we have already peaked with this one and are now on the inevitable downward slide?

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4 hours ago, LiamCasey said:

I don't know about you but, if I was in need of a detective, I would avoid Mr. Wong like the plague! Or should I be more up-to-date and write "like the coronavirus"?

It is not just him. This type of thing has long disturbed me. I began a thread to address this: "Classic Detectives and Collateral Damage."

 

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13 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Or imagining what it would be like to live in a radiator.

In heaven, everything is fine...

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Finally getting around to some stuff that has been on my DVR for a little while:

The Nurse's Secret (1941) - I was experiencing total deja vu during the first few minutes. I knew I hadn't seen this film before and yet it seemed so familiar. Then I pinpointed the issue. This was a remake of a film I saw just a few months ago. So I now have Lee Patrick and Regis Toomey instead of Joan Blondell and George Brent. Getting that out of the way, this was just an ok murder mystery. 

Little Women (1933) - Somehow I have escaped many years without seeing any adaptations of Little Women so I figured that I would start with the first sound version. The first hour I thought was draggy and unfocused, but the second part made up for that with excellent and touching performances from Katharine Hepburn, Paul Lukas, and Joan Bennett.

None Shall Escape (1944) - Why isn't this film better known? Produced while the war was still raging, it anticipated the future prosecution of Nazi war criminals. Alexander Knox, whom I primarily remember as giving a decent performance as Woodrow Wilson in the Zanuck biopic, is chillingly and disturbingly effective in personifying the evil of his character. 

Three Smart Girls (1936) - just missing Hayley Mills as the twins.

Vogues of 1938 (1937) - recorded this from the Movies! channel. Good performances from Joan Bennett and Warner Baxter who is channeling his previous work from "42nd Street." This was one of the earlier Technicolor features, and it must have been a wonder to behold when originally released.  Sadly, the transfer I saw looked rather faded and soft. I would love to see this film given a proper restoration. Even in this compromised form, Bennett looked ravishing. 

Dead Reckoning (1947) - Put "The Maltese Falcon" and "The Big Sleep" in a blender and this is probably what you end up with. Bogie even goes through the whole "I'm turning you into the police and I'll have a few sleepless nights" routine again. I'm not saying it's a bad film though.  The antique car buff in my enjoyed seeing Bogie driving around in a Lincoln Continental. 

Manhattan Madness (1916) - caught this Douglas Fairbanks silent on youtube. This was in Doug's pre-Swashbuckling era, and there is plenty of humor, stunts and thrills to go around. The plot is delightfully silly but not "The Mystery of the Leaping Fish" silly. 

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I'm on a bit of a Ralph Meeker kick right now, and by kick I've watched two of his films fairly close together.  Lol.  I also have The Naked Spur to watch at some point, so that'll bring  me up to three.

Last night, I watched Something Wild (1961) starring  Meeker and Carroll Baker.  I think I recorded this during last year's SUTS? It was when Carroll Baker was the featured star that day.  Anyway, I always see this movie during the Criterion sales, but had never seen it before.

In Something Wild, Carroll plays a young college student, Mary Ann,  who falls victim to a rapist while walking home through a park.  It is seemingly a random attack, but it is very creepy when she is walking and she hears faint noises of someone walking (twigs breaking, leaves crunching, etc.) but there  is nobody behind her.  However, as the audience, you know something bad is about to happen.... and it does.  Mary Ann is justifiably traumatized and hesitant to tell anyone what happened.  Her hesitance to tell anyone I imagine is mostly due to trauma (she doesn't want to keep re-living it over and over), embarrassment, and shame.  Seeking to put this incident behind her, she destroys all of the clothing that she was wearing on the night of the rape. 

The next morning, Mary Ann attempts to put her life back together.  She rides the subway to school but faints as the close proximity of strangers against her body causes her extreme anxiety and I imagine, some PTSD.  She ends up being brought home by a police officer, must to the shame of her prim and proper mother.  Mary Ann's mother goes on and on about how much embarrassment Mary Ann  has caused the family by coming home in a police car and worries about  the image that they're portraying to the neighborhood.  It becomes obvious very quickly that Mary Ann will never be able to tell her mother the true cause behind her fainting on the subway.  Her mother would probably figure out how to make this whole incident Mary Ann's fault and how Mary Ann's rape brings shame to the family and the neighborhood.

Mary Ann leaves home (without a note or any warning) and finds a crappy apartment in a tenement next door to Edith Bunker. This apartment is awful, but only $5/week, but at least Mary Ann can be alone, or so she thinks.  Edith Bunker is so obnoxious with her cavalcade of men and drunken parties that Mary Ann cannot get any sleep and the  abrasive Edith and the strange men are not helping.  Needing to make enough  money to afford the $5/week rent, Mary Ann finds work at the Woolworth's five and dime store, working alongside the grandma from Everyone Loves Raymond. However, Mary Ann's need to keep to herself and aloofness toward her co-workers makes her the target of petty comments.  At the beginning of the shift, the ladies decide to band together and rush Mary Ann through the store doors.  However, this is reminiscent of the trauma she experienced on the Subway with people touching her, and she ends up having another PTSD/anxiety attack and goes home.

The next day, despondent Mary Ann decides that she's done with life and attempts to jump off a bridge.  That's when she is saved by a lonely mechanic, Mike, played by Ralph Meeker.  He takes her to his home and says that she can rest somewhere quiet and private while he's at work.  She's hesitant at first (because duh, it's a stranger's house, a strange man no less), but when Mike assures her that he won't be home, she decides that it's a good option. Mike's apartment is only slightly better than Mary Ann's, but not by much.  It's a very dingy, very minimalist home. Anyway, Mary Ann is able to rest and appreciates Mike's kindness.  Until the evening... when Mike comes home absolutely trashed.  Trashed to the point where he can barely walk.  He sees Mary Ann and drunkenly tries to force himself on her.  She is able to fight him off, but spends the rest of the night in sheer terror.

Much of the rest of the film deals with Mary Ann wanting to leave, Mike saying no, Mike leaving, Mike coming home drunk.  The only difference between the other times is Mike going straight to bed after coming home drunk and not trying to attack Mary Ann. Mary Ann asks repeatedly to leave (Mike locks the door from the inside and keeps the key on his person) and Mike says no, stating that "[she's his] last chance" and "[he] needs [her]." 

As the audience, I should loathe Mike and despise him for keeping Mary Ann held prisoner; but I think deep down, this is a desperate man wanting happiness.  He wants a companion, he wants love.  Did he go about it in a good way? No. Definitely not.  Holding someone hostage is never a good plan.  However, I don't think he is the monster that we're led to believe.  I think this is a man that's probably had his heart broken so many times and is so lonely, that having Mary Ann with him makes him feel that all hope is not lost. 

I thought this was a very interesting film, even though  it featured a subject I'm not too particularly fond of--rape.  However, I appreciated that the rape scene wasn't graphic and much of it was comprised of specific shots that got across the idea that she was being raped, but didn't actually show anything.  I loved the grittiness of the cinematography and I loved the great music.  This film was a good mix of interesting, drama, and weirdness that I appreciated.  Both Ralph and Carroll portrayed very complex characters.  I thought Ralph did a particularly good job with his portrayal of the lonely mechanic. 

I would watch this film again.

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The Fatal Hour (1940) - Amazon Prime

w/ Boris Karloff, Marjorie Reynolds and Grant Withers. Plus the original Jason Robards. And still directed by William Nigh.

A fellow San Francisco police detective and boyhood friend of Capt. Bill Street (Grant Withers) is murdered while working undercover and Chinese-American detective James Lee Wong (Boris Karloff) comes to help Capt. Street in his investigation of that murder (because if Capt. Street came to Mr. Wong for help, he would then have had to have been murdered as per the first three movies in this series). As does reporter and girlfriend Bobbie Logan (Marjorie Reynolds). Which leads our trio to investigate an oriental jewelry smuggling ring, a love triangle and old-time (at least to us) radio programming.

The fourth of six detective movies from Monogram Pictures featuring the aforementioned Mr. Wong. And it appears that the answer to my earlier question wondering if we have already peaked with this series and are now on the inevitable downward slide is a yes. But at least it is a slow decline at this point.

And now the new question: Why did they take Mr. Wong's name out of the movie's title?

And, finally, with regards to SansFin's "Classic Detectives and Collateral Damage" theory, this movie has 4 murders; 3 of which occur after Mr. Wong gets involved.

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