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     I figure it this way:  If Heather Mills had shown up on the SNL set and kicked Sir Paul in the walnuts with her wooden leg he would have been able to hit the ^high^ notes required.

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     I figure it this way:  If Heather Mills had shown up on the SNL set and kicked Sir Paul in the walnuts with her wooden leg he would have been able to hit the ^high^ notes required.

 

LOL

 

(...yeah, you might be RIGHT, Mr.G)

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There's an entire web page devoted to playing songs backwards (something much easier to do in the days of vinyl & record players) I have d/l a few like Queen's ANOTHER ONE BITS THE DUST when played backwards says "smoke marijuana" believe it or not.

 

OK, I rewatched SLIGHTLY FRENCH yesterday and found I had slept through the entire middle the first time. It was actually rather cute, with Ameche's charactor training Dottie to impersonate a French girl for a movie part. I still find Ameche to be wooden and smug, not very likable. Dottie of course was adorable, especially when she acted like a tough townie gal. The story had a little MY FAIR LADY about it, especially when she blew up at Ameche when he tried taking credit for her success. 

 

So yeah, a rather predictable and light comedy....but Dorothy Lamour brings life and sparkle to make it worth watching. 

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For the first time, I watched HERE COMES MR. JORDAN from start to finish. I realize that it was a fantasy, but the plot was utterly ridiculous.. It's an Essential if you want to know how a ridiculous plot plays out.

As further evidence that I don't follow the pack, I thought JEANNE EAGELS was pretty good. Novak and especially Jeff Chandler acquitted them selves admirably, Chandler should have done more non-Westerns and non-actioners.

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I've been pretty busy lately, but I have watched a few movies.  I have a ton of things recorded on the DVR, it'll take me forever to catch up, but I'm trying. 

 

The Night of the Iguana.  I'd been wanting to see this movie for awhile now, mostly because it was a John Huston movie.  I always find Huston's movies interesting if nothing else.  This movie was very odd.  It's one of those movies that you watch and afterward, you can't decide if you liked it or not.  Richard Burton was good, but doesn't do anything for me.  I'm indifferent to him.  Deborah Kerr was blah like usual.  She was good in this film, but I always find her a bit bland.  I thought Sue Lyon (who seems to have made a brief career playing "Lolita") was a bit ridiculous, but it worked somewhat due to the youth of her character.  I think the most interesting performance in this film was that of Ava Gardner.  She definitely looked a bit "rough" in this film, but was still very beautiful, even though smoking as started taking its toll on her voice.  I loved the frankness and sexiness of her character.  I feel that her voice and style of speaking is truest to "the real Ava Gardner" as her character speaks very similarly to the language and style of speech Gardner used in her autobiography. 

 

Jeanne Eagles.  I've been trying to see more of Kim Novak's work, so I recorded this film during the movie star biopics that aired last week.  While I understand that this is a highly embellished telling of Eagles' story, I thought that Novak's performance was very good.  It was different than anything I had seen Novak in prior.  She played the hysterical drunk and the emotional star very well.  While I thought she was a little over the top in a couple scenes, it didn't hurt my enjoyment of the film.  I figured being a "little over the top" was par for the course for an actress character.  I also really enjoyed Agnes Moorehead.  Moorehead always delivers an excellent performance in whatever she's in.  I found Jeff Chandler to be a bit dull and forgettable, but he didn't hurt the film any. 

 

The Gazebo.  This film was crazy.  The only comedic role I'd seen Glenn Ford in prior to this film was Courtship of Eddie's Father and in that film, he was more of a straight-man for Ron Howard.  In this film, Ford's character was the crazy one.  Being targeted by a blackmailer, Ford ends up murdering him and then burying his body under wife Debbie Reynolds' gazebo.  Ford then spends the film nervous about the gazebo and the body.  I never realized that Reynolds had appeared in so many different types of films.  Whether she's in a musical like Singin' in the Rain or a drama like The Catered Affair or a black comedy like 'Gazebo,' I always enjoy Reynolds' film persona and performance.  Glenn Ford, who usually seems a bit stiff was also enjoyable and played his "Nervous Nelly" character very well.

 

Inside Out.  Pixar's newest film.  I saw it last week on my birthday.  It was a great movie.  It's obvious that the filmmakers performed extensive research on psychology.  It was fantastic how they were able to easily explain how the human mind works and how memories are created and stored.  I loved the characters and how colorful the film was.  Of course, being Pixar, their film had a couple moments that made me a little teary eyed.  It was a somewhat emotional film about emotions, lol.  Great job Pixar! I'm looking forward to their next film that comes out in November.

 

 

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A film EugeniaH recommended--"The Passion of Joan of Arc"(1928)--What Ben Mankiewisc called "the greatest performance in the history of film" & the angelic soundtrack is absolutely emotionally shattering.  Will edit post after I've processed the film.

 

Edit--The film is almost entirely done of close-ups that focus on Falconetti's eyes.  They show what she's thinking and are hypnotic--which is what the director wanted.  If there were technical errors, I did not catch them.  In a lesser film, I would have noticed--just like in an clip from a medieval set .epic Italian film made in the 30's I saw, the armies are all wearing wristwatches.

 

Final thoughts--The images from TPoJoA haunt one long after the film ends.    This film is one of the greatest silent films I've ever saw/seen, IMO.

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A film EugeniaH recommended--"The Passion of Joan of Arc"(1928)--What Ben Mankiewisc called "the greatest performance in the history of film" & the angelic soundtrack is absolutely emotionally shattering.  Will edit post after I've processed the film.

 

It resembles a stage play.  The soldiers sometimes look like American WWI and  think I've seen a blooper - a guy wearing glasses.  I don't believe that sort of tech was around then, the early 1400's by which hand held magnifiers were these crude devices.  Sean Connery used these in "The Name of The Rose" (1986)

 

first-spectacles1.jpg

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A film EugeniaH recommended--"The Passion of Joan of Arc"(1928)--What Ben Mankiewisc called "the greatest performance in the history of film" & the angelic soundtrack is absolutely emotionally shattering.  Will edit post after I've processed the film.

 

The first time I saw this film, it took me a while to "get over it".  I saw it just before I was supposed to go to sleep for the night.... Needless to say I was lying in bed for quite a while, my eyes wide open, thinking...

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Last night I re-watched one of my favorite Sidney Poitier movies: Lilies of the Field.

 

Homer Smith (Poitier) is driving along a hot desert highway when he realizes that he needs water for his car radiator.  He pulls up to a remote convent of German-speaking Catholic nuns.  Poor, unsuspecting Homer thinks he’ll just get the water and be on his way.  But it soon becomes apparent that he’s going to be roped into doing work for the Lord.

 

Despite the movie’s religious theme, this is not an hour-plus long sermon.  This is a charming, humorous, wonderful movie.  As usual, Poitier embodies his character with naturalness and ease.  Though Homer tries his best to stay independent, arguing and threatening to leave the Catholic group on any number of occasions, he’s also charmed by the innocent, and at times childlike, sisters.  I loved watching Homer scrap with the hard-nosed Mother Superior in particular, whom he sarcastically calls “Mama”.  They are both stubborn people, for different reasons.  She orders him to go to Mass (“I’m a BAPTIST!”, he responds, but he goes!), and her declaration that he will be building their chapel sends him into a hilarious temper tantrum.  But the viewer already knows he’s in for it…  Still, we don't anticipate the wonderful events that unfold around the building of it, and the insights we get into Homer Smith's character.

 

I love the scene where the nuns ask Homer to play the guitar.  He picks it up and strums, “Frankie and Johnny were looo-verrs…”  The nuns sit looking at him silently, blankly.  Homer quickly stops himself, looking as if he were wishing there were a hole he could crawl into.

 

If one were especially philosophical, he or she could see this film and think of a higher theme, where there are times when each of gets into life situations where we fight and feel helpless, but in the end it was all “meant to be”, for a higher purpose.  But even without trying to get any deeper meaning out of it, Lilies of the Field is just a funny film with well-drawn characters that’s worth a watch.

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The first time I saw this film, it took me a while to "get over it".  I saw it just before I was supposed to go to sleep for the night.... Needless to say I was lying in bed for quite a while, my eyes wide open, thinking...

 

The real Joan of Arc had to be more "rough" than the one portrayed in the film to lead an army and considering her very young age, very tough.. History (and some film makers)  has a bad reputation of raising heroes to standards that's not realistic.

 

 

When I think of Joan of Arc...

 

joan-of-arc-feminist.jpg

 

 

....the Milla Jovovich's character of Joan in "The Messenger" (1999) is best portrayed.  She's no Christmas tree angel decoration.

 

the-messenger-the-story-of-joan-of-arc-m

 

 

This Joan couldn't lead a Girl Scout troop.

 

passion5.jpg

Edited by hamradio
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I am watching Heaven Can Wait right now with Don Ameche and Gene Tierney.  This is a great film.  I've never seen a Don Ameche film before--I love his voice! This is a very fun film and very entertaining.  Gene Tierney's aged wig is cracking me up, the hairstyle is so ugly!

 

gene+tierney+old+heaven+can+wait.png

 

I was surprised to see Scotty Beckett in the beginning of the film.  I had never heard of him until a couple months or so when I saw My Favorite Wife and now he keeps popping up in everything I'm watching: My Reputation, Kings Row, and now Heaven Can Wait

 

This was a great film for both Ameche and Tierney.  I also enjoyed Marjorie Main and Eugene Pallette as Tierney's bickering parents. 

 

I think this film will make a great addition to my collection.

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Speedy, have ever heard the old radio show, The Bickersons. Don Ameche and Frances Langford are married and do a lot of, well, bickering. Very funny at times.

 

I've heard of the radio show, but I've never heard the radio show. 

 

EDIT: I just listened to the first few minutes of the show... man is Mrs. Bickerson a nag.  Lol.  No wonder Mr. Bickerson sounds so irritated.  I'm sure that the show is funny though.

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I am watching Heaven Can Wait right now with Don Ameche and Gene Tierney.  This is a great film.  I've never seen a Don Ameche film before--I love his voice! This is a very fun film and very entertaining.  Gene Tierney's aged wig is cracking me up, the hairstyle is so ugly!

 

gene+tierney+old+heaven+can+wait.png

 

I was surprised to see Scotty Beckett in the beginning of the film.  I had never heard of him until a couple months or so when I saw My Favorite Wife and now he keeps popping up in everything I'm watching: My Reputation, Kings Row, and now Heaven Can Wait

 

This was a great film for both Ameche and Tierney.  I also enjoyed Marjorie Main and Eugene Pallette as Tierney's bickering parents. 

 

I think this film will make a great addition to my collection.

The film is a quintessential example of the "Lubitsch touch".

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I recently splurged on a boatload of DVDs and bought movies that I’ve seen once or twice before and liked a lot.  Last night I watched Marty.

 

In the opening scene you see a woman from a lower-class New York neighborhood chiding Marty Piletti continually: “Whatsa matter with you?  Whatsa matter with you?  Whatsa matter with you?”  This is the theme of the movie – why isn’t Marty married?  Why isn’t he loved?  Why doesn’t he fit in with the rest of society?

 

Marty’s social scene is his group of male friends, but he mainly hangs with his best friend Angie, a fellow “loser”.  Marty is filled with a lot of self-doubt, and is socially awkward. In one scene, Marty gets up the courage to call Mary Feeney after Angie convinces Marty that she likes him.  He stumbles over his words: “I wonder if you might recall me?”  Needless to say Mary does not recall him, nor does she want to go on a date with him.

 

You can almost physically feel Marty’s pain as he strikes out in life.  The lines are good, and Borgnine delivers them so that they hit your heart.  “There comes a point in a man’s life when he’s gotta face some facts.  And one fact that I gotta face is that whatever it is that women like, I haven’t got!”

 

In contrast, you see married couples having their own sets of problems, Marty’s cousins Virginia and Tommy in particular, showing that the grass on the other side is not always greener.

 

Marty finally sees light at the end of the tunnel when he meets Claire, a sweetly attractive girl who is dumped by her obnoxious blind date for not being “hot” enough.  Two social rejects coming together and falling in love, seemingly a stale concept, but the script is fantastic.  As they are dancing, Marty gives some insight into his character: “You don’t get to be good-hearted by accident.  You get kicked around long enough, you get to be a real professor of pain.”

 

Marty’s mother tries to break them up – she fears being abandoned – and Angie doesn’t like her because he is jealous of the way she monopolizes Marty’s time.  Marty is again filled with self-doubt and does not show up for his date with Clara, until he finally gets smart and realizes that he wants to rise above it all and pursue happiness.

 

There was one thread running through the movie that I thought was interesting.  The characters say one thing and feel one way early on, then change their minds later.  Marty’s mother encourages him to get married, then later tries to break up him and his girlfriend.  Marty’s cousin Tommy encourages Marty to buy the butcher shop, then later tells him he is foolish.  Tommy is in agreement with his wife that his mother should live elsewhere, then turns on Virginia when his mother starts to cry.  There are other such “switches” that happen throughout – did anyone else notice this?

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I recently splurged on a boatload of DVDs and bought movies that I’ve seen once or twice before and liked a lot.  Last night I watched Marty.

 

In the opening scene you see a woman from a lower-class New York neighborhood chiding Marty Piletti continually: “Whatsa matter with you?  Whatsa matter with you?  Whatsa matter with you?”  This is the theme of the movie – why isn’t Marty married?  Why isn’t he loved?  Why doesn’t he fit in with the rest of society?

 

Marty’s social scene is his group of male friends, but he mainly hangs with his best friend Angie, a fellow “loser”.  Marty is filled with a lot of self-doubt, and is socially awkward. In one scene, Marty gets up the courage to call Mary Feeney after Angie convinces Marty that she likes him.  He stumbles over his words: “I wonder if you might recall me?”  Needless to say Mary does not recall him, nor does she want to go on a date with him.

 

You can almost physically feel Marty’s pain as he strikes out in life.  The lines are good, and Borgnine delivers them so that they hit your heart.  “There comes a point in a man’s life when he’s gotta face some facts.  And one fact that I gotta face is that whatever it is that women like, I haven’t got!”

 

In contrast, you see married couples having their own sets of problems, Marty’s cousins Virginia and Tommy in particular, showing that the grass on the other side is not always greener.

 

Marty finally sees light at the end of the tunnel when he meets Claire, a sweetly attractive girl who is dumped by her obnoxious blind date for not being “hot” enough.  Two social rejects coming together and falling in love, seemingly a stale concept, but the script is fantastic.  As they are dancing, Marty gives some insight into his character: “You don’t get to be good-hearted by accident.  You get kicked around long enough, you get to be a real professor of pain.”

 

Marty’s mother tries to break them up – she fears being abandoned – and Angie doesn’t like her because he is jealous of the way she monopolizes Marty’s time.  Marty is again filled with self-doubt and does not show up for his date with Clara, until he finally gets smart and realizes that he wants to rise above it all and pursue happiness.

 

There was one thread running through the movie that I thought was interesting.  The characters say one thing and feel one way early on, then change their minds later.  Marty’s mother encourages him to get married, then later tries to break up him and his girlfriend.  Marty’s cousin Tommy encourages Marty to buy the butcher shop, then later tells him he is foolish.  Tommy is in agreement with his wife that his mother should live elsewhere, then turns on Virginia when his mother starts to cry.  There are other such “switches” that happen throughout – did anyone else notice this?

Yes, great observation.  It is easier to be an arm-chair critic and sit on the fence instead of engaging in life.  Fear of change and the unknown cripples these souls.  That is something Marty learns to overcome and gets on with things by being his own man.

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Yes, great observation.  It is easier to be an arm-chair critic and sit on the fence instead of engaging in life.  Fear of change and the unknown cripples these souls.  That is something Marty learns to overcome and gets on with things by being his own man.

 

I thought the character of Marty was a very "real" person.  I think a lot of us can say that we have known Marty-types in our lives.  Betsy Blair played the awkward girlfriend - I had to laugh because wasn't she once married to Cary Grant in real life?    :)

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I thought the character of Marty was a very "real" person.  I think a lot of us can say that we have known Marty-types in our lives.  Betsy Blair played the awkward girlfriend - I had to laugh because wasn't she once married to Cary Grant in real life?    :)

 

Blair was married to Gene Kelly.   You're thinking of Betsy Drake. 

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Yeah, I noticed those switches, Eugenia.  But, I noticed something ELSE!  :P

 

Marty's mother and aunt have yet to attain the "ripe old age" of 60, and were complaining about being "over the hill" and ready for the trash heap at the "doddering" old age of 58!  They even dressed the part!  Grey-streaked hair pulled back tightly in a severe bun(for the aunt) both with those drab old print dresses, and the same style shoes they wore for twenty years.  Hard soled and heeled hard leathered footwear that made them appear older than their years.  What was amusing about it was that one time about 11 or so years ago was my WIFE'S first time EVER seeing the movie, and there SHE was, all of 63 years old, sitting there in her lightweight summer slacks, T-shirt and New Balance athletic walking shoes and a mid length "pixie" type hair-do watching these 58 year old "fossils" gripe about being OLD!

 

She even afterwards started teasing our neice(her God daughter) who had just started college that she was, "One-a step from-a the street!"  :lol:

 

Time SHO have changed!

 

 

Sepiatone

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Yeah, I noticed those switches, Eugenia.  But, I noticed something ELSE!  :P

 

Marty's mother and aunt have yet to attain the "ripe old age" of 60, and were complaining about being "over the hill" and ready for the trash heap at the "doddering" old age of 58!  They even dressed the part!  Grey-streaked hair pulled back tightly in a severe bun(for the aunt) both with those drab old print dresses, and the same style shoes they wore for twenty years.  Hard soled and heeled hard leathered footwear that made them appear older than their years.  What was amusing about it was that one time about 11 or so years ago was my WIFE'S first time EVER seeing the movie, and there SHE was, all of 63 years old, sitting there in her lightweight summer slacks, T-shirt and New Balance athletic walking shoes and a mid length "pixie" type hair-do watching these 58 year old "fossils" gripe about being OLD!

 

She even afterwards started teasing our neice(her God daughter) who had just started college that she was, "One-a step from-a the street!"  :lol:

 

Time SHO have changed!

 

 

Sepiatone

 

Absolutely, times have changed!  And, the two "old" women weren't even playing the scene for laughs!  I was thinking this also last night - when one of them said their age, I thought, wow, and she looks so old!  She should look younger!

 

Yeah, I loved that comment about "one step away from the street".   ;)

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I finally caught up with Universe (1960) a short film made by the National Film Board (NFB) which was directed by Roman Kroiter and Colin Low, two of the IMAX pioneers.  I was almost going to put this little post in the Bucket List thread as it is a film that I have long wanted to see. 

I had read that Stanley Kubrick was enamoured by this b&w short.  And once viewed, you can see why.

Thee are many model shots combined with mattes to give multi planet views of our own solar system.  I think the images of distant galaxies may be artist's interpretations in some cases too much like the space corridor sequence in 2001 A Space Odyssey.

It is only 28 minutes long and worth seeing especially for Kubrick fans.  Of course, its effects have been superseded by modern technology but at least one thing about this film is almost unique: its narration. The narrator is none other than Canada's own Douglas Rain, the voice of HAL 9000 in 2001.

The Toronto library system has but one copy on vhs for anyone nearby.

 

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The Moon and Sixpence, part of Saturday’s small tribute to director Albert Lewin.  (This tribute included The Essentials selection Dorian Gray, which has a rousing debate elsewhere on this board.) Was also featured in the Martin Scorsese TCM column (http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/1091436%7C0/Scorsese-Screens-for-June.html)

Moon is a very unusual film, loosely based on the life of painter Paul Gauguin.  “Loosely” because all names are changed and events are not completely consistent with the famous artist’s life.  A notable feature of the film is that the first half is shot in black and white, and then switches to color when the character moves to Tahiti.  However, for most of the second half color is only used to present the island scenes with an amber tint, and only one very short segment at the end is shown in full color.

George Sanders is very good as the ~Gauguin, but his character is completely unsympathetic for most of the film.  The main theme seems to be that although ~Gauguin’s works would eventually make him a world-famous artist, during his life he was a complete wrecking ball to all those around him who gave him their love and support.

I did appreciate the film’s performances and the unusual aspects of the production, but overall feel that the whole was somewhat a miss.  Making a film which is ostensibly about Gauguin but does not use Gauguin’s name and also changes major events in the person’s life seems curious.  I also did not get much out of the amber tint for the second half, and the very short color sequence at the end to me did not pay off the decision to present it this way.  In the introduction Robert said they were specifically blocked by the estate from showing any of Gauguin’s actual works, so perhaps such issues prevented them from making the film as they had originally intended.
 

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The Moon and Sixpence, part of Saturday’s small tribute to director Albert Lewin.  (This tribute included The Essentials selection Dorian Gray, which has a rousing debate elsewhere on this board.) Was also featured in the Martin Scorsese TCM column (http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article/1091436%7C0/Scorsese-Screens-for-June.html)

 

Moon is a very unusual film, loosely based on the life of painter Paul Gauguin.  “Loosely” because all names are changed and events are not completely consistent with the famous artist’s life.  A notable feature of the film is that the first half is shot in black and white, and then switches to color when the character moves to Tahiti.  However, for most of the second half color is only used to present the island scenes with an amber tint, and only one very short segment at the end is shown in full color.

 

George Sanders is very good as the ~Gauguin, but his character is completely unsympathetic for most of the film.  The main theme seems to be that although ~Gauguin’s works would eventually make him a world-famous artist, during his life he was a complete wrecking ball to all those around him who gave him their love and support.

 

I did appreciate the film’s performances and the unusual aspects of the production, but overall feel that the whole was somewhat a miss.  Making a film which is ostensibly about Gauguin but does not use Gauguin’s name and also changes major events in the person’s life seems curious.  I also did not get much out of the amber tint for the second half, and the very short color sequence at the end to me did not pay off the decision to present it this way.  In the introduction Robert said they were specifically blocked by the estate from showing any of Gauguin’s actual works, so perhaps such issues prevented them from making the film as they had originally intended.

 

Now I'm curious to see Donald Sutherland's Gauguin film again, Wolf at the Door aka Oviri just to see what they did with the paintings in that film.

It would make a good triple bill on TCM with Lust For Life.

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