Jump to content
 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

2 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

ūüėĄ

Actually, the character's real name is Martha, the cult leader renamed her Marcy May and if any female member answers the one phone in their farmhouse, they are instructed to say their name is Marlene. 

I haven's seen the movie but it sounds like she could be a pretty mixed up kid.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ivanhoe (1952) with Robert Taylor, Elizabeth Taylor, Joan Fontaine, and George Sanders

I'm a sucker for medieval films in technicolor and I really enjoyed this one. There's a lot of star power in this film, but the two performances that impressed me the most were by Sanders and Guy Rolfe as Prince John. Some of the timing during the combat scenes was comical, as some of the actors were left standing still for an extra second or two, while they waited to be killed. That doesn't detract from the film at all, though. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just watched THE HARDER THEY FALL on MOVIES.  As a huge Bogart fan, I can't believe I hadn't seen it before now. Also, it was Bogart's last film. I read that although he was sick he arrived on time every day and showed little if any signs of the pain he was enduring.  Rod Steiger, his co-star, commented that working with Bogart was a great experience.  The movie was really good and  featured some of the actual famous boxers of that time.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I just watched SARATOGA '37 the other night for the Harlow tribute. I think I've seen all Harlow's movies and never been impressed enough to own one. I find her voice squeaky and she has an odd look that doesn't translate well in B&W.

Amazing I've never seen SARATOGA before, it was the most enjoyable one I can recall. A lot of Harlow's scenes were shot in profile, which she looks great. I liked her character-first played as a phony socialite, then softens towards Gable, who wouldn't? Gable plays his usual happy go lucky scammer and is his typical adorable self here.

The plot revolves around horse racing and had me wincing in the first scene: both Gable & elderly Lionel Barrymore hold a horse by the halter-a very dangerous thing to do! The horse could pull a human up off the ground & break a hand, safer leverage to use a 6 foot lead rope. Amazing star stunts in early movies!

The movie was a typical screwball comedy, well performed by all including fave support gals Una Merkel & Hattie McDaniel. Glad I saw it, but again don't want to own it.

321px-Saratoga_poster.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

A lot of Harlow's scenes were shot in profile,

You may or may not be aware that Harlow passed away during filming and those profile shots were stand ins.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, laffite said:

You may or may not be aware that Harlow passed away during filming and those profile shots were stand ins.

It feels like ghoulish sport trying to spot Mary Dees, Harlow's stand-in, in Saratoga. Sometimes it's easier such as when those binocular are never taken away from her face in the scene below. A voice double had to do Jean in the Dees scenes.

hqdefault.jpg

MV5BM2U1YThlMzEtMjM0Yi00Nzg3LTkyOWItYjg3

Mary without the binoculars

Jean's death resulted in this minor racetrack comedy being one of the biggest box office hits of 1937. One of my favourite scenes is when Hattie McDaniel participates in a song, The Horse With The Dreamy Eyes, aboard a train, getting to show off her personality as much as a strong singing voice.

vlcsnap-00016.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just watch two movies in succession that have a remarkably similar scene. There is a particularity involved which constitutes a veritable coincidence. It involves that famous house that was used over and over again (by Warner Brothers, I think), the one with the winding staircase. In each of these movies, a male actor has been stuck down on this staircase,ending up sprawled in the same place, about three steps from the bottom. In one movie, the man is dead; in the other, he is not dead. Dare I leave it that, for the time being, and ask if anyone would like to hazard a guess what these two movie are? Both have had recent  viewings on TCM. I'm going to post on each of these shortly. One of them I liked beyond words and featured perhaps the greatest (i.e. most enjoyable) performance I have ever seen on screen. The other, probably the more famous of the two, is not a favorite. Here is a hint. One has Claude Raines, the other Kirk Douglas. Any ideas? 

///

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, laffite said:

I've just watch two movies in succession that have a remarkably similar scene. There is a particularity involved which constitutes a veritable coincidence. It involves that famous house that was used over and over again (by Warner Brothers, I think), the one with the winding staircase. In each of these movies, a male actor has been stuck down on this staircase,ending up sprawled in the same place, about three steps from the bottom. In one movie, the man is dead; in the other, he is not dead. Dare I leave it that, for the time being, and ask if anyone would like to hazard a guess what these two movie are? Both have had recent  viewings on TCM. I'm going to post on each of these shortly. One of them I liked beyond words and featured perhaps the greatest (i.e. most enjoyable) performance I have ever seen on screen. The other, probably the more famous of the two, is not a favorite. Here is a hint. One has Claude Raines, the other Kirk Douglas. Any ideas? 

///

MV5BNTRjMTUzNjgtZWE1Zi00YTEyLTg0MzgtZTE3

strange-love-of-martha-ivers-1946-1.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Beach Party (1963)

MV5BZjI3ZmUwNDgtMGM1MC00YzQ0LWFmNzctOWFl

It's harmless stuff that you can just put on and forget about. Has some easy thrills, a lot of groovy slang, a beach with beach guys and beach girls, bongos, more groovy musical choices and Greasers that remind me of Bikers but might be Greaser Bikers- but none of that matters as the reveal of Big Daddy, the man chilling in that chair for the entire movie is revealed and he says the word. That was easily the best part of the movie, even over the credits dancing that is on the level and really gives you the scoop and a song that fits the movie perfectly. That reveal... that was worth sitting through it and surprisingly, the word wasn't "Surf's Up" and cutting to them all surfing and catching some waves.

6/10 (Originally 5/10 but that reveal was a +1)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Ampersand said:

Beach Party (1963)

MV5BZjI3ZmUwNDgtMGM1MC00YzQ0LWFmNzctOWFl

It's harmless stuff that you can just put on and forget about. Has some easy thrills, a lot of groovy slang, a beach with beach guys and beach girls, bongos, more groovy musical choices and Greasers that remind me of Bikers but might be Greaser Bikers- but none of that matters as the reveal of Big Daddy, the man chilling in that chair for the entire movie is revealed and he says the word. That was easily the best part of the movie, even over the credits dancing that is on the level and really gives you the scoop and a song that fits the movie perfectly. That reveal... that was worth sitting through it and surprisingly, the word wasn't "Surf's Up" and cutting to them all surfing and catching some waves.

6/10 (Originally 5/10 but that reveal was a +1)

I love the Beach Party movies. They're ridiculous, but they have their moments.  They also seem to be a bit of the same, with Annette always mad at Frankie for some reason, but they're fun.  I love the 50s/60s teen beach movies though.  I have the entire Frankie and Annette boxed set.

I may have watched all three Beach Party movies that were on last night.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Deception (1946) It might grandiose and entirely hyperbolic to announce that Claude Raines in this movie is the greatest performance I have ever seen, but I can say with absolute certainty say that this is the most enthralling within recent or longer memory, or perhaps ever, that I remembering being so affected in real time. As opposed to, say, watching a great performance and realizing only later (or something). It was more like being at a sporting event and cheering after as home run. Really into it. Playing the expansive and somewhat diabolical seems an idea vehicle for this guy. Simply magnificent. I was thinking throughout the experience that his role in Mr Skeffington was practically a waste of time. Only about a tenth of his range was used. In this current movie being discussed, every word, every gesture, every facial expression, and that wild head of hair, is of the moment. Bette Davis is on familiar ground, having secrets and lying about every inch of the way. We've seen this before. She was fine but is upstaged in every scene with Claude. Henreid was perfectly cast, the inherent fragile over-sensitivity of a serious musician is etched on his long narrow face, though he can erupt vehemently if challenged. It doesn't help to be afflicted by the green-eyed monster. The concerto sounded pretty good and it was no doubt composed by Korngold. I haven't looked anything up so not sure whether that is an actual piece in real life. Rains looked pretty good as the maestro. Most actors who portray symphony conductors look phony.

SPOILER

When Hollenius (Rains) reveals a weakness (the fear of death) it foreshadows the possibility that it might be his nemesis, but it turns out to be a "misdirect" as Hollenius, with a gun aiming at him, walks through or never feels the fear and instead lurches into the surprise of his demise. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Irving Rapper doesn't have a great reputation as a director, but Deception is very smartly directed. This film looked even better to me on a second viewing.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Achieved a TCM milestone last night. Saw my very first "TCM Underground" film in a complete viewing (I had never seen one of the Underground picks on the late night it aired before): White Lightning from 1973.

Watching it right now. Really hope things work out between Burt and ‚ÄúShaky Pudding.‚Ä̬†

Link to post
Share on other sites

 "Aileen Wuornos: Mind of a Monster" (2019)  Serial killer Aileen Wuornos writes down her darkest secrets to her best friend now revealed for the first time.

Glad I didn't watched the movie "Monster" (2003) which didn't had her thoughts.  But NO Hollywood scriptwriter could had came up what the judge said upon sentencing...

Circuit Judge Uriel Blount....May God have mercy upon your corpse.

Now that was a {spit-take} moment, apparently she didn't have a soul. :blink::lol:

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, laffite said:

Deception (1946) It might grandiose and entirely hyperbolic to announce that Claude Raines in this movie is the greatest performance I have ever seen, but I can say with absolute certainty say that this is the most enthralling within recent or longer memory, or perhaps ever, that I remembering being so affected in real time. As opposed to, say, watching a great performance and realizing only later (or something). It was more like being at a sporting event and cheering after as home run. Really into it. Playing the expansive and somewhat diabolical seems an idea vehicle for this guy. Simply magnificent. I was thinking throughout the experience that his role in Mr Skeffington was practically a waste of time. Only about a tenth of his range was used. In this current movie being discussed, every word, every gesture, every facial expression, and that wild head of hair, is of the moment. Bette Davis is on familiar ground, having secrets and lying about every inch of the way. We've seen this before. She was fine but is upstaged in every scene with Claude. Henreid was perfectly cast, the inherent fragile over-sensitivity of a serious musician is etched on his long narrow face, though he can erupt vehemently if challenged. It doesn't help to be afflicted by the green-eyed monster. The concerto sounded pretty good and it was no doubt composed by Korngold. I haven't looked anything up so not sure whether that is an actual piece in real life. Rains looked pretty good as the maestro. Most actors who portray symphony conductors look phony.

SPOILER

When Hollenius (Rains) reveals a weakness (the fear of death) it foreshadows the possibility that it might be his nemesis, but it turns out to be a "misdirect" as Hollenius, with a gun aiming at him, walks through or never feels the fear and instead lurches into the surprise of his demise. 

 

 

16 hours ago, kingrat said:

Irving Rapper doesn't have a great reputation as a director, but Deception is very smartly directed. This film looked even better to me on a second viewing.

DECEPTION (1946) is a highly watchable film- and it is the closest to a JOAN CRAWFORD MOVIE that BETTE DAVIS made while at WARNERS.

CLAUDE RAINES is having a GD BALL in the part and- had he not been nominated for NOTORIOUS that year, he would have been for this.

THAT STAIRCASE (which deserved a SAG card after this movie) is also in NOW, VOYAGER and a few other WARNERS joints AND is A HELLUVA LOT MORE INTERESTING IN ITS PART THAN IS PAUL HENREID,

I  LOVE A WARNER BROS STAIRCASE!

At the risk of being a little tacky, and i'll delete this if anyone takes offense,but DAMN BETTE LOOKS LIKE HOLY HELL IN THIS MOVIE! She is, ahem, not at optimal weight either (and this was two years before she had the baby.) I KNOW she was having a hard time personally and (as always) professionally, but DECEPTION is in some ways the POINT OF NO RETURN in her eventual metamorphasis into ONE OF THOSE MEAN APPLE TREES FROM "THE WIZARD OF OZ" which really SPED UP around the time of BUNNY O'HARE.

bless her heart, etc etc

I found a DVD of DECEPTION for $2.99 at a ross and bought it.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Achieved a TCM milestone last night. Saw my very first "TCM Underground" film in a complete viewing (I had never seen one of the Underground picks on the late night it aired before): White Lightning from 1973.

I "watched" this and GATOR, its 1976 sequel. I think both films were made with the notion that the audience would be making out/and our fighting while it was onscreen, so I did some light cleaning, sketching, and BOMBED at the NYT CROSSWORD whilst casually glancing and largely listening.

there was not a lot to either, but - you know, maybe it's the NORTH CAROLINA in me, but I liked them. WHITE LIGHTNING had a surprisingly anemic finale and sense of scriptlessess, but LOUISE LASSER and DIANE "LAD" were both terrific- the latter in fact, so good, kinda wish they had SPELLED HER LAST NAME RIGHT IN THE CREDITS. The revelation for me was NED BEATTY, who I have never given much thought to (I've never seen DELIVERANCE.) He was EXCELLENT in his role as the sheriff- he had one STANDOUT scene in particular where he explains why he takes money from moneshiners and gives it to his deputies that was THE BEST THING in either film, just some ace dialogue delivery.

I STILL SAY THE DEFINITIVE MOONSHINE RUNNING MOVIE HAS YET TO BE MADE.

GATOR- which was directed by MISTER BURT REYNOLDS- surprised me also by being largely really well acted. seriously. even JERRY REED. I kind of have to say I would have liked to have seen more directorial efforts from BURT, he has a very relaxed (some might say too relaxed- there are some ODD FILLER SCENES IN THIS) style. SPOILER KIND OF: I think you should know that BERNICE FROM DESIGNING WOMEN in in this and she GETS BLOWED UP.  the end to this one also seems a tad underdone. SOME NICE LOCATION SHOOTING OF COASTAL GEORGIA AS WELL AS SOME HIDEOUS CARS IN THIS ONE. LAUREN HUTTON  is in this and she seems like she should be trying on hats with JACLYN SMITH the whole time. HOW WAS SHE 42 YEARS OLD FOR THREE DECADES?

Give GATOR  a chance if you get the time.

edit- oH my gosh, i almost forgot, JERRY REED'S HENCHMEN IS PLAYED BY A 7 FOOT TALL ACTOR AND THERE ARE NUMEROUS SCENES OF HIM DRIVING HIS 197SOMETHING LINCOLN CONTINENTAL LIKE THIS WHICH (I PROMISE) YOU WILL NEVER GET TIRED OF:

gatorbluraymp4_snapshot_013820_20180725_

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My explanation of Bette in Deception is that she just visited a gypsy fortune teller named Magda who said, aided by a cloudy crystal ball "I see dark forest in  future vid  you in black scary hair.  Black vig.  In forest.  Und den I see nuthink!"

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

At the risk of being a little tacky, and i'll delete this if anyone takes offense,but DAMN BETTE LOOKS LIKE HOLY HELL IN THIS MOVIE! She is, ahem, not at optimal weight either (and this was two years before she had the baby.)

According to NOTES in the TCM Database for this movie, Bette found out she was pregnant during the filming.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Stranger on the Third Floor Poster

Stranger On The Third Floor (1940) VHS tape 8/10

A reporter (John McGuire) is accused of murder but insists that an evil faced stranger (Peter Lorre) is the real killer. The reporter's girl friend (Margaret Tallichet) tries to prove his innocence.

I re watched this again and still like it a lot. It is considered by many to be the first "noir" film ever. It is short (64 minutes) and very engrossing, the voice overs by McGuire give it a radio play feel but the dream sequence is a  great cinematic scene. Lorre is still very menacing as the psycho killer though he only has a few minutes of screen time. Here is an interesting bit of trivia:

Several years ago I saw this film in NYC revival house Tallichet's daughter (and her father was director William Wyler) was present at the screening. She said in the scene where Tallichet is confronted by Lorre, he had been eating raw onions to make him even more repulsive to her. If you watch the scene you can see him breathing in her face and she recoils in disgust. She thinks he did that because she was very inexperienced and would help her perform the scene better. 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Stranger on the Third Floor Poster

Stranger On The Third Floor (1940) VHS tape 8/10

A reporter (John McGuire) is accused of murder but insists that an evil faced stranger (Peter Lorre) is the real killer. The reporter's girl friend (Margaret Tallichet) tries to prove his innocence.

I re watched this again and still like it a lot. It is considered by many to be the first "noir" film ever. It is short (64 minutes) and very engrossing, the voice overs by McGuire give it a radio play feel but the dream sequence is a  great cinematic scene. Lorre is still very menacing as the psycho killer though he only has a few minutes of screen time. Here is an interesting bit of trivia:

Several years ago I saw this film in NYC revival house Tallichet's daughter (and her father was director William Wyler) was present at the screening. She said in the scene where she is confronted by Lorre, he had been eating raw onions to make him even more repulsive to her. If you watch the scene you can see him breathing in her face and she recoils in disgust. She thinks he did that because she was very inexperienced and would help her perform the scene better. 

Lorre must have eaten those raw onions before he put on those false teeth.     I really enjoy this film but those false teeth create a ghoulish type of vibe that I don't think was necessary. 

PS:   For others that might be confused:   Tallichet was married to director William Wyler.     She only worked as an actress for one more year,  making her final film in 1941.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Lorre must have eaten those raw onions before he put on those false teeth.     I really enjoy this film but those false teeth create a ghoulish type of vibe that I don't think was necessary. 

If I remember correctly, those weren't false teeth. His teeth were in horrendous condition, and he had them pulled soon afterward.

DhXuOVQWAAALCQD.jpg

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

If I remember correctly, those weren't false teeth. His teeth were in horrendous condition, and he had them pulled soon afterward.

DhXuOVQWAAALCQD.jpg

I guess one could say this was a case of perfect casting.

I assumed they were false teeth since I assumed Lorre worth false teeth when playing the Japanese Mr. Moto (also made in the late 30s \ early 40s).

Image result for mr moto images

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I guess one could say this was a case of perfect casting.

I assumed they were false teeth since I assumed Lorre worth false teeth when playing the Japanese Mr. Moto (also made in the late 30s \ early 40s).

Image result for mr moto images

 

According to his biography, his teeth started falling apart at a young age due to his chainsmoking and his heavy morphine addiction, the latter picked up after bouts of gall bladder problems years earlier. After having his teeth fixed and kicked his drug habit, he started packing on the weight that plagued his later years. He also picked up a drinking problem. 

I thought I recalled that he still had his real, bad teeth in Stranger on the Third Floor, but it's been many years since I've watched it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...