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19 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

According to his biography, his teeth started falling apart at a young age due to his chainsmoking and his heavy morphine addiction, the latter picked up after bouts of gall bladder problems years earlier. After having his teeth fixed and kicked his drug habit, he started packing on the weight that plagued his later years. He also picked up a drinking problem. 

I thought I recalled that he still had his real, bad teeth in Stranger on the Third Floor, but it's been many years since I've watched it.

Thanks for that info;   I was influenced by this guy into thinking anytime a white actor played a Japanese character false teeth were used!

Image result for mickey rooney breakfast at tiffany's gif

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I just saw The Invisible Man at the movies. I won't give anything away, but I will say that I liked it. 

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It surprised me. The writers were successfully original with an old idea. The first half is extremely good. The ending could have been a little better, but all in all still passes. I liked the performances. especially the lead, Elisabeth Moss. She did a very good job. 

The suspense and tension of the invisible man creeping about, doing what invisible men who are half-crazed usually do, is creepy as heck. Those scenes are eerily without music, which I like. There are a couple twists that I didn't see coming, which I also like. In case anyone is wondering, the 'R' rating is for language. The F word is used in times of anger and fear, but not all that much, and there is no nudity. 

If you haven't seen it already, you should give it a try. Pretty good.

 (Seeing as it was made today, with all the crap out there, the filmmakers deserved a good rating.)

By the way, his name is Griffin. 😀

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Seven Days in May (1964)

This is the first time I’ve seen this movie and it has instantly become one of my all-time favorites. Every single actor put in a great performance. If I was forced to choose, I’d give the best performance to March. I rarely come across films that make my jaw drop, but this one did. 
 

 

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3 hours ago, YourManGodfrey said:

Seven Days in May (1964)

This is the first time I’ve seen this movie and it has instantly become one of my all-time favorites. Every single actor put in a great performance. If I was forced to choose, I’d give the best performance to March. I rarely come across films that make my jaw drop, but this one did. 
 

 

Wow!

Seriously.

//

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Don't be confused. I meant that I admire your take on the movie. That's what seriously means. I recently had a jaw dropping experience myself. Seeing Claude Rains in Deception. Great performance. It's fun to get blown away by something really good.

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7 hours ago, laffite said:

Don't be confused. I meant that I admire your take on the movie. That's what seriously means. I recently had a jaw dropping experience myself. Seeing Claude Rains in Deception. Great performance. It's fun to get blown away by something really good.

Uh,  one can edit their post;     Seriously no  one on this planet would interpret that comment as being positive.

(my take was that you were surprised that they hadn't seen the film until now).

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16 hours ago, YourManGodfrey said:

Seven Days in May (1964)

This is the first time I’ve seen this movie and it has instantly become one of my all-time favorites. Every single actor put in a great performance. If I was forced to choose, I’d give the best performance to March. I rarely come across films that make my jaw drop, but this one did. 
 

 

Yes, a terrific film alright, YMG. I've probably watched it at least half a dozen times in the past, and still find myself engrossed into the proceedings whenever I happen upon it on TCM.

However, if you think about it, there IS one aspect that seems rather dated by today's standards, ya know.

And THAT being that the ace-in-the-hole -- those love letters he wrote to Eleanor (Ava Gardner) -- are never played against the lead coup conspirator Gen. Scott (Burt Lancaster) in order to completely discredit and disgrace him in the eyes of his adoring public. And, that it COULD work in such a regard back in 1964.

(...yep, a rather quaint thought now days, wouldn't ya say?!) ;)

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7 minutes ago, Dargo said:

Yes, a terrific film alright, YMG. I've probably watched it at least half a dozen times in the past, and still find myself engrossed into the proceedings whenever I happen upon it on TCM.

However, if you think about it, there IS one aspect that seems rather dated by today's standards, ya know.

And THAT being that the ace-in-the-hole -- those love letters he wrote to Eleanor (Ava Gardner) -- are never played against the lead coup conspirator Gen. Scott (Burt Lancaster) in order to completely discredit and disgrace him in the eyes of his adoring public.

(...yep, a rather quaint thought now days, wouldn't ya say?!) ;)

What if those letters from the macho General included lines like, "And I just loved wearing those frilly little dresses of yours, Eleanor. I could really relax in them."

 

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21 minutes ago, TomJH said:

What if those letters from the macho General included lines like, "And I just loved wearing those frilly little dresses of yours, Eleanor. I could really relax in them."

 

LOL

I've now thought of a few other possible missives between the two here Tom, however I don't think we should sidetrack this thread anymore.

(...just for the record here though, one of 'em included the use of a couple of Russian hookers and a wet bed...just in an attempt to "update" the plot point in this movie, you understand)

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28 minutes ago, Dargo said:

LOL

I've now thought of a few other possible missives between the two here Tom, however I don't think we should sidetrack this thread anymore.

(...just for the record here though, one of 'em included the use of a couple of Russian hookers and a wet bed...just in an attempt to "update" the plot point in this movie, you understand)

What the Swede was really thinking . . .

Ava-Gardners-costumes-The-Killers-1-e139

"Look at that black topless job. I could really knock all their eyes out in that one."

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14 hours ago, laffite said:

Don't be confused. I meant that I admire your take on the movie. That's what seriously means. I recently had a jaw dropping experience myself. Seeing Claude Rains in Deception. Great performance. It's fun to get blown away by something really good.

Sorry, I thought you were mocking my take on it. The last two films that I’ve been blown away by have been Burt Lancaster films; Atlantic City and Seven Days in May. He’s quickly becoming one of my favorite actors.

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10 minutes ago, YourManGodfrey said:

Sorry, I thought you were mocking my take on it. The last two films that I’ve been blown away by have been Burt Lancaster films; Atlantic City and Seven Days in May. He’s quickly becoming one of my favorite actors.

Another good one for Burt is Criss Cross (1949). He's very good but it's the movie overall that is exceptional. It aired on TCM a few months ago and it's still on the DVR for revisits.

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Did anyone else see Thank Your Lucky Stars last night, with Michael Feinstein's introduction? Feinstein was interested in highlighting the work of lyricist Arthur Schwarz, working this time with Frank Loesser. 

Eddie Cantor was one of those stars, like Al Jolson,  who meant something to my parents' generation. I had never seen him before. He plays a dual role in Thank Your Lucky Stars. Two Eddie Cantors is about three too many for my taste. My parents also loved Bob Hope and Bing Crosby, and that I understand completely. Eddie Cantor's brand of comedy has not worn as well, at least to me. It's like the song Dennis Morgan sings in TYLS. Morgan has an outstanding voice, but most of us today don't care for the operetta style of such songs.

Ann Sheridan singing "Love Isn't Born, It's Made" was the highlight of the film for me, with Bette Davis' "They're Either Too Old or Too Young" a close second. Sheridan looked gorgeous, even with the bizarre snood on her hair. I also enjoyed Hattie McDaniel and crew in "Ice Cold Katie." Olivia and Ida looked like they were having fun with their number, and Edward Everett Horton and S.Z. Sakall made a good comic duo.

 

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28 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Did anyone else see Thank Your Lucky Stars last night, with Michael Feinstein's introduction? Feinstein was interested in highlighting the work of lyricist Arthur Schwarz, working this time with Frank Loesser. 

Eddie Cantor was one of those stars, like Al Jolson,  who meant something to my parents' generation. I had never seen him before. He plays a dual role in Thank Your Lucky Stars. Two Eddie Cantors is about three too many for my taste. My parents also loved Bob Hope and Bing Crosby, and that I understand completely. Eddie Cantor's brand of comedy has not worn as well, at least to me. It's like the song Dennis Morgan sings in TYLS. Morgan has an outstanding voice, but most of us today don't care for the operetta style of such songs.

Ann Sheridan singing "Love Isn't Born, It's Made" was the highlight of the film for me, with Bette Davis' "They're Either Too Old or Too Young" a close second. Sheridan looked gorgeous, even with the bizarre snood on her hair. I also enjoyed Hattie McDaniel and crew in "Ice Cold Katie." Olivia and Ida looked like they were having fun with their number, and Edward Everett Horton and S.Z. Sakall made a good comic duo.

 

I have seen TYLS before but I did "remote" to it from time-to-time so that I could try to catch the 3 acts you mention in the last paragraph and saw the one with Bette Davis and the one with Olivia and Ida.       

I also saw the Dinah Shore singing bit.      Funny but her future boyfriend,   Burt Reynolds, was only 7 when she made the film.

As for Cantor:  Yea,   just not my type of comedy.     But hey he did notice Shore and hired her as a regular on his radio show, Time to Smile, in 1940.

 

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

Did anyone else see Thank Your Lucky Stars last night, with Michael Feinstein's introduction? Feinstein was interested in highlighting the work of lyricist Arthur Schwarz, working this time with Frank Loesser. 

Eddie Cantor was one of those stars, like Al Jolson,  who meant something to my parents' generation. I had never seen him before. He plays a dual role in Thank Your Lucky Stars. Two Eddie Cantors is about three too many for my taste. My parents also loved Bob Hope and Bing Crosby, and that I understand completely. Eddie Cantor's brand of comedy has not worn as well, at least to me. It's like the song Dennis Morgan sings in TYLS. Morgan has an outstanding voice, but most of us today don't care for the operetta style of such songs.

Ann Sheridan singing "Love Isn't Born, It's Made" was the highlight of the film for me, with Bette Davis' "They're Either Too Old or Too Young" a close second. Sheridan looked gorgeous, even with the bizarre snood on her hair. I also enjoyed Hattie McDaniel and crew in "Ice Cold Katie." Olivia and Ida looked like they were having fun with their number, and Edward Everett Horton and S.Z. Sakall made a good comic duo.

 

I've seen this movie before.  I agree that Eddie Cantor's comedy is dated.  My favorite part of this movie is (surprise!) the Errol Flynn part. I also loved Ann Sheridan's song and while Dennis Morgan's singing style isn't my favorite, I love Dennis Morgan so I look past it. 

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1 hour ago, kingrat said:

Did anyone else see Thank Your Lucky Stars last night, with Michael Feinstein's introduction? Feinstein was interested in highlighting the work of lyricist Arthur Schwarz, working this time with Frank Loesser. 

Eddie Cantor was one of those stars, like Al Jolson,  who meant something to my parents' generation. I had never seen him before. He plays a dual role in Thank Your Lucky Stars. Two Eddie Cantors is about three too many for my taste. My parents also loved Bob Hope and Bing Crosby, and that I understand completely. Eddie Cantor's brand of comedy has not worn as well, at least to me. It's like the song Dennis Morgan sings in TYLS. Morgan has an outstanding voice, but most of us today don't care for the operetta style of such songs.

Ann Sheridan singing "Love Isn't Born, It's Made" was the highlight of the film for me, with Bette Davis' "They're Either Too Old or Too Young" a close second. Sheridan looked gorgeous, even with the bizarre snood on her hair. I also enjoyed Hattie McDaniel and crew in "Ice Cold Katie." Olivia and Ida looked like they were having fun with their number, and Edward Everett Horton and S.Z. Sakall made a good comic duo.

 

I recorded it to watch this wknd. Wanted to see Bette sing and dance again! LOL.

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6 hours ago, kingrat said:

Did anyone else see Thank Your Lucky Stars last night, with Michael Feinstein's introduction? Feinstein was interested in highlighting the work of lyricist Arthur Schwarz, working this time with Frank Loesser. 

Eddie Cantor was one of those stars, like Al Jolson,  who meant something to my parents' generation. I had never seen him before. He plays a dual role in Thank Your Lucky Stars. Two Eddie Cantors is about three too many for my taste. My parents also loved Bob Hope and Bing Crosby, and that I understand completely. Eddie Cantor's brand of comedy has not worn as well, at least to me. It's like the song Dennis Morgan sings in TYLS. Morgan has an outstanding voice, but most of us today don't care for the operetta style of such songs.

Ann Sheridan singing "Love Isn't Born, It's Made" was the highlight of the film for me, with Bette Davis' "They're Either Too Old or Too Young" a close second. Sheridan looked gorgeous, even with the bizarre snood on her hair. I also enjoyed Hattie McDaniel and crew in "Ice Cold Katie." Olivia and Ida looked like they were having fun with their number, and Edward Everett Horton and S.Z. Sakall made a good comic duo.

 

Thank Your Lucky Stars may be my favourite of the all star bond films turned out by the studios during the war thanks to a few of its specialty acts. I agree, kingrat, that a little of Eddie Cantor can go a very long way but it's fun to see Bette Davis let herself get thrown around by a jitterbug, or whatever he was, on the dance floor for her "They're Either Too Young Or Too Old" number and I agree that Ann Sheridan is spectacularly gorgeous in her musical number (that sounds like her real singing voice too). But I'm a little surprised you made no reference to Errol Flynn's delightfully self spoofing "That's What You Jolly Well Get" number as a Cockney sailor, poking fun at his own image as a movie war hero. To my eye Flynn is the funniest performer in the film. He even shows off a few dance steps.

Keep in mind something else, too. Flynn performed this number at the same time that he was on trial for statutory rape and his film career (as well as personal freedom) were both on the line. He was worried enough that reports had it that, if found guilty, he had plans to flee authorities with a plane ready to fly him to South America. He'd have been the most famous fugitive in the world. Yet the actor performed the number in this film with an effortless ease as if he didn't have a care in the world. Don't let anyone tell you that Errol Flynn couldn't act.

tumblr_mpzut6D7l31snx77eo6_400.gif&key=7

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The last four movies I watched were all on a gaggle of aging VHS tapes I keep around:

CRACKING UP (1983)  (This has aired on TCM in the past; I remember watching it on Turner Classic a few years ago, but last night I watched it on a 1984-release videocassette).

UNDER THE RAINBOW (1981)   Hadn't seen this in quite some time.  I enjoyed it despite its critical trashing.   

FLOOD! (1976-Tvm)  Oh, NO!  It's a '70s Disaster Film with a TV movie budget! 

NIGHT OF THE GRIZZLY, The (1966)  A 1985 Paramount Home Video release.  I'd been meaning to watch this again for a while. 

 

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I've watched Kiss of Death (1947) many times and finally got around to writing a review here are some paragraphs from it.

Poster%2BKOD.jpg

You know right from the get go. The Dutch Angled opening credits. The chiaroscuro Manhattan cityscapes and silhouettes.The hints of Street Scene on the soundtrack (by Alfred Newman). Victor Mature with a couple of hoods knocking over a jewelry shop on the 24th floor of the Chrysler Building. One of the few a voice over narrations by a woman Coleen Gray. From these you know you're in for one of the great Classic Noirs.

Street Scene was originally used for Street Scene 1931) and was re-used for Cry Of The City, I Wake Up ScreamingWhere The Sidewalk Ends, and The Dark Corner.

Directed by Henry Hathaway (The House on 92nd Street (1945), The Dark Corner (1946), Call Northside 777 (1948), Fourteen Hours (1951) and Niagara (1953). The film was written by Ben Hecht and Charles Lederer with additional scenes by Philip Dunne, and based on the story by Eleazar Lipsky. Cinematography was by Norbert Brodine.

The film stars Noir vets Victor Mature, six Classics Noirs as Nick Bianco, Brian Donlevy himself a vet of six Classic Noir, as Assistant D.A. Louis D'Angelo, Coleen Gray (five Classic Noir) as Nettie, Richard Widmark (seven Classic Noir) in his first starring role, as over the top hitman nutjob Tommy Udo. With Taylor Holmes as sleazy mob mouthpiece Earl Howser, Howard Smith  as the Sing Warden, Karl Malden as NYPD Sgt. William Cullen, and Anthony Ross as mobster 'Big Ed' Williams.


Christmas Eve. New York City. Last minute shopping for the wife and kids. Excon Nick Bianco and three other hoods knock over a jewelry shop located on the 26th floor of the Chrysler Building. The robbery goes off without a hitch the getaway by local elevator screws them over when one of the tied up jewelers is able to hit an alarm button before they make the lobby.

What's amazing is how fast the NYPD is able to respond and the building is sealed off. Nick tries to scoot out a side entrance through an adjacent shop.  He socks a cop blocking the entrance and runs out onto East 43nd Street between Lexington Avenue and 3rd Avenue, can see the Third Avenue el* down the block in the background. He tries to cross the street and he gets shot down in the gutter.

Anyway the shooting of Nick causes enough distraction that it allows the other three goons to escape while Nick is arrested, tried and sentenced to four years up the river in Sing Sing.

Before he's transported the assistant D.A. D'Angelo asks Nick to be a squealer and give up his partners for the sake of his wife and two little girls. Nick tells him he's no squealer. Nicks mouthpiece Howser assures Nick that his family will be taken care of. While Nick is waiting for sentencing in a holding tank he meets hitman for hire Tommy Udo. Udo is a real piece of work.

Nick does three years in the barbed wire hotel. After three months go by and he doesn't receive a letter from his wife he finally finds out from another con just arrived that she committed suicide and his kids were sent to an orphanage.

Nick checks the obits and gets the details.

So much for is partners in crime taking care of things for him.  Nick gets visited by Nettie the woman who used to babysit his girls. She tells him she had moved away from the neighborhood and just found out what had happened.

* interesting note on wikipedia:

Deleted scenes

"A deleted scene involving Nick's wife Maria (who was played by Patricia Morison) was cut from the film. In this scene, a gangster (played by Henry Brandon) who is supposed to look out for her while Nick is in prison rapes her. Afterwards, Maria commits suicide by sticking her head in the kitchen oven and turning on the gas. Both scenes were cut from the original print at the insistence of the censors, who wanted no depiction of either a rape or a suicide, so although Morison's name appears in the credits, she does not appear in the film at all. Mention is made later in the film about Mature's wife's suicide and a now obscure reference is made by Nettie that the unseen gangster Rizzo contributed to the wife's downfall."


Nick racked with anguish asks to see the warden and tells him that he's ready to make a deal with D'Angelo. You'll have to watch the film to see what happens.

I like the use of Street Scene as a sort of signature New York City theme and the fact that for a New York based Film Noir the producers did a surprising amount lot of actual New York City and it's environs location shooting.

"Kiss of Death was shot between March and May 1947, with additional scenes being shot in June. Much of the filming was done in New York, using locations as practical sets, including the Chrysler Building, the Criminal Courts Building at 100 Centre Street, the old Hotel Marguery at 270 Park Avenue at 48th Street, the St. Nicholas Arena, and the now-demolished Bronx House of Detention for Men (later known as the Bronx County Jail) at 151st Street and River Avenue. Additional locations include Sing Sing Penitentiary in Ossining and the Academy of the Holy Angels in Fort Lee, New Jersey. " (Wikipedia)

Also add to the above Sing Sing Prison in Ossining, and Scarboro Station (scene where Nick puts Nettie and the kids on the train). For any interested the St. Nicholas Boxing Arena was converted to a television production facility in 1962 and eventually demolished in 1982 to make way for the main offices of the ABC Network up near Lincoln Center.

Finally this film is one of the few Classic Noirs that was partially shot in my old home neighborhood of Astoria, Queens. As a kid I remember spending some sunny afternoons sitting on a blanket on a grassy hillside in Astoria Park watching the New York City ship, tug, and railcar float traffic on a very busy East River. Back in the 1950s the trees were still small and there was a beautiful view of the river.  The park sits on a patch of ground whose boundaries are roughly the Triboro and Hell Gate bridges.

Screencaps are from a recent TCM screening.  More Screencaps with full review in Film Noir/Gangster Pages 10/10

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7 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

I've watched Kiss of Death (1947) many times and finally got around to writing a review here are some paragraphs from it.

Poster%2BKOD.jpg

Finally this film is one of the few Classic Noirs that was partially shot in my old home neighborhood of Astoria, Queens. As a kid I remember spending some sunny afternoons sitting on a blanket on a grassy hillside in Astoria Park watching the New York City ship, tug, and railcar float traffic on a very busy East River. Back in the 1950s the trees were still small and there was a beautiful view of the river.  The park sits on a patch of ground whose boundaries are roughly the Triboro and Hell Gate bridges.

Street Scene was originally used for Street Scene 1931) and was re-used for Cry Of The City, I Wake Up ScreamingWhere The Sidewalk Ends, and The Dark Corner.

Screencaps are from a recent TCM screening.  More Screencaps with full review in Film Noir/Gangster Pages 10/10

That's beautiful.

The instrumental STREET SCENE used to get on my nerves, but I've come around on it.

I AM COMPELLED to be 8.5/10 on KISS OF DEATH and it is 100% over THAT ENDING AND THE VOICEOVER. Otherwise it is one HELL of a movie.

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i re re re re watched THIRTEEN WOMEN after badmouthing it in the HITS AND MISSES thread.

it's an interesting movie- i did not know the score was by MAX STEINER, apparently it was a preview of his work in KING KONG. it seems to me at moments as if it ig trying to invoke SWAN LAKE and thusly DRACULA, to which i think it  is safe to say, this film owes something of a debt.

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1 hour ago, cigarjoe said:

Finally this film is one of the few Classic Noirs that was partially shot in my old home neighborhood of Astoria, Queens. As a kid I remember spending some sunny afternoons sitting on a blanket on a grassy hillside in Astoria Park watching the New York City ship, tug, and railcar float traffic on a very busy East River. Back in the 1950s the trees were still small and there was a beautiful view of the river.  The park sits on a patch of ground whose boundaries are roughly the Triboro and Hell Gate bridges.

cigarjoe, have you ever visited the Lent Homestead? It's the oldest continuously lived in residence in NYC. Technically in East Elmhurst,  it's quite near the Astoria border. I went to a reception there, about 20 years ago. It was originally lived in by the Riker family, several of whom are buried in the small cemetery in the back.

Speaking of Queens locations, I lived in LIC from 1982-2002, when LIC was still a village. I came home from work one warm May day in the late 1980s, and saw snow on the windows of my local elevated #7 station (45th Road/Court House Square). Coming down the stairs, I noticed that the shops had signs in Yiddish on them. Then I spotted a chair that said "Mr. Mazursky." They were shooting Enemies, A Love Story.  The neighborhood under the #7 elevated train was used to represent the Bronx neighborhood under the Jerome Avenue El, a few decades earlier.

hero_EB19900105REVIEWS1050301AR.jpg

 

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