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3 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

We plan to keep watching  to see where this goes.

If it's anything like the OS it goes nowhere. Ever.

20 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:

Smashing Time (1967) Source: DVD

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Thank you for your take on it & bringing it to my attention. Sounds right up my alley -  found it on YT and put it on my list to watch later. 

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2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

If it's anything like the OS it goes nowhere. Ever.

It is, and it doesn't.  

The classic first season is iconic TV history, but as for the second season...now you know why those "Season arc" series TP invented always change their arc after the season finale.

Still, nice to see everyone trapped in the house long enough to start discovering CLASSIC TV again, When Episodes Were Episodes.  Now, let's see who discovers The Prisoner reruns on Amazon/PlutoTV...

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Attila (2001) - Gerard Butler stars as the title Hun, who conquered much of the "known world" in the 5th century AD. His chief opponent is devious Roman general Flavius Aetius (Powers Boothe). Also featuring Simmone Jade MacKinnon, Alice Krige, Tim Curry, Steven Berkoff, Sian Phillips, Reg Rogers, Liam Cunningham, and Isla Fisher. A lot of it is fictional hokum, but if you like historical epics, you should like this. The performances are decent, and it was nice seeing Boothe in a more substantial role than he was generally playing at the time. 7/10

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Well, let's see.  I've watched a few JOHN WAYNE movies lately.  I caught OPERATION PACIFIC the other night (late at night) on TCM, Pilgrim!  :)  Hadn't seen that in a while.  I need to buy myself a copy of that for my homevideo stash. 

Last night I watched McQ (1974). Hadn't seen it in a while, either.  I noted an unusually cogent observation of the movie on an IMDb 'User Comment'.  Something I'd not thought of despite having seen McQ some 10 times.  Don't know how I missed it . . . but I did.  McQ is one of Wayne's darkest movies. 

***WARNING:  Here Be Spoilers***  Do not read further if you haven't seen it!

To wit, Wayne's trusted partner has turned into 'Dirty Cop' and stashes a bunch of dope in Wayne's Camaro and then wastes two other cops at the beginning of the movie before being gunned down himself.   A hit man then tries to blast Wayne shortly thereafter.  Wife of trusted cop partner seems to be 'clean' . . . but as the movie goes on and she gently comes on to Wayne we see she has more than one motive.  And when Wayne goes to see Myra (Colleen Dewhurst) he brings her drugs to get her to talk.  And then she gets killed, too!  And the honest, hardworking 'Servant of the People' Franklin Toms (Clu Gulager) turns out to be a dirty cop as well.  Sheesh!  Not to mention dope dealer Manny Santiago (Al Lettieri) who runs under a cloak of respectability is heavily involved in the plot and tries to get his hands on the 2 million worth of drugs . . . only to find it's sugar.  The crooked cops have already have already made the switch.  Further, Wayne thinks Captain Kosterman (Eddie Albert) could be covering up any of his involvement with the drug-switching while Kosterman thinks McQ is "on the take" and so policeman J.C. (Jim Watkins) is watching McQ's every move.  And at the end, after a wild chase on the beach, Lois (Diana Muldaur) has been found to be carrying the drugs out of town so she's not even remotely clean, either.  Yow!  Loads of rotters in this one!   

No wonder Wayne wants to go to a bar at the end and have a drink . . . 

NOTE that The Duke's next movie -- where he played a Chicago policeman sent to England -- has the requisite amount of action and some violence and death, but even so it's played with a lighter touch.  If one were to watch McQ and BRANNIGAN one after the other I think it's quite noticeable in the difference in tone.  Wayne jokes around Judy Geeson and her boyfriend in 'BRANNIGAN' while in McQ 'The Duke' is grabbing drug dealers off the street and taking their stuff ("The balloons!  Spit 'em out!") to take to Myra to get her to talk of many things with a coke bribe.  As one example. 

***SPOILERS BE OVER NOW*** Proceed further for more juicy info!  :P

Anyway . . . to watch McQ last night I retrieved my 1984 WARNER HOME VIDEO clamshell.  The 35+ year-old VHS tape is one of those heavy muthas.  Drop the tape from a 10-story window on to someone's head it's likely to knock them out.   → Like stuffing a brick with mylar in it inside your VCR.  The font on the opening and closing credits from the first-release in 1984 is different from the later WARNER VHS releases and all subsequent releases on DVD, it seems.  (I don't know if McQ is on Blu-Ray). 

The mis-spelled name on the beginning credits ('FRED WAUG') on the '84-release tape was corrected to 'FRED WAUGH' in the later font-change.  I had an early '90s Warner tape of McQ that I'd bought new and then several years later when I found a decent used  Warner clamshell release from a closing video store I played the older tape and noted the 'font' change from the early release to the later one. 

(P.S.  Yes, I know.  I lied about any 'juicy info'.  It's just a bit of trivial fluff that I noticed many moons ago).       

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The Magnificent Seven Ride! (1972)

It was my first time seeing any of the Magnificent Seven films. I guess it was an odd choice to start at the end of the series, but it caught my eye and Lee Van Cleef looked like a rugged, old gunfighter. It was an okay film with a dark theme. I’d like to see the others in the series now.

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1 hour ago, YourManGodfrey said:

The Magnificent Seven Ride! (1972)

It was my first time seeing any of the Magnificent Seven films. I guess it was an odd choice to start at the end of the series, but it caught my eye and Lee Van Cleef looked like a rugged, old gunfighter. It was an okay film with a dark theme. I’d like to see the others in the series now.

The first is by far the best. The cast, the excitement, and the soundtrack make it one of the best Westerns ever made. Yul Brynner makes a surprisingly good cowboy.

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2 hours ago, YourManGodfrey said:

The Magnificent Seven Ride! (1972)

It was my first time seeing any of the Magnificent Seven films. I guess it was an odd choice to start at the end of the series, but it caught my eye and Lee Van Cleef looked like a rugged, old gunfighter. It was an okay film with a dark theme. I’d like to see the others in the series now.

The sequels were ehh, but THE original Magnificent is good if you know it's trying to be the genuine Kurosawa Seven Samurai.  Complete with the downbeat Twilight-of-the-gunfighter theme that was supposed to reflect Kurosawa's deconstructive Twilight-of-the-samurai theme in the Japanese version.  CtToI, the original B&W Kurosawa isn't too darn bad, either, if you don't mind swords instead of guns.  🏯

(James Coburn always told the story of how he took the knife-thrower role after hearing "Wait, is my character going to be that cool silent-swordsman expert?...I'm in!")

56 minutes ago, Rudy's Girl said:

The first is by far the best. The cast, the excitement, and the soundtrack make it one of the best Westerns ever made. Yul Brynner makes a surprisingly good cowboy.

How many people wanted to remake Westworld hoping to be the cool Gunfighter, without realizing that was "supposed" to be a nasty version of Brynner's Chris Adams?

 

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The Mists of Avalon (2001) and Earthsea (2004) - They were both such disappointing duds, especially considering their source materials, that I can't drudge up enough interest to go into any depth about them. 5/10 and 4/10, respectively.

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Strange Justice (1932)

I wasn't in the mood for something with a complicated plot that I had to follow, so I tossed on this short pre-code. It's obviously a B-movie, but it's surprisingly interesting. It clocks in at just over an hour and features a number of plot twists. Some of the acting isn't the best, but that's okay. I always like when I go into a film expecting absolutely nothing and it ends up being far better than it should have been. 

Algie the Miner (1912)

This is a great 10 minute short from Alice Guy-Blache. It reminds me of a Buster Keaton film. 

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On 3/25/2020 at 10:58 AM, Sepiatone said:

I'm tired of dingleberries  who watch a 40-50 year old or older movie and complain about it being "dated".  Of COURSE it's "dated", it's 50-60 friggin' years OLD!  :angry: If you DON'T like "dated" movies, then WHY THE HELL do you tune in to TCM???

"Play Misty For Me"?   HA!   What tickled me was that when it came out, most I knew who went to see it was so they could find out who Misty WAS!  :D  Like maybe some chick or old "perv" was into role play or something.  ;)  Others voiced surprise that "Misty" referred to the old song,  and further surprised to learn JOHNNY MATHIS didn't write it!  Originally an instrumental composed by ERROLL GARNER, lyrics were added later by Johnny Burke.   Personally, i thought the movie was OK as a suspense thriller, but overrated overall.  For me the highlights were Eastwood's character's playlist as a jazz DJ, and his time at the Monterey Jazz Festival.  

LAWRENCE :   Nice list of mini-series.  Too bad I only caught a few of them.  The ones I missed look interesting.  Gonna have to find a way to see them.  Thanks.

Sepiatone

Hey, Tone, did you catch The Brain That Wouldn't Die this morning? 

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16 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

Hey, Tone, did you catch The Brain That Wouldn't Die this morning? 

What? I thought you would be the first to post about that lusty music and the cat fight. Meow.

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I saw it scheduled and it gave me pause....

The few times I saw it was on SVENGOOLIE, and seemed more fitting there or on the newer COMET channel. It usually cracks me up.  

Now, should I somehow be offended by your query?   Or was there some other reason you asked?

Sepiatone

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Kraftwerk and the Electronic Revolution (2008) - Lengthy British documentary on the krautrock scene from the late 1960's through its heyday in the 1970's. The film discusses such groups as Can, Tangerine Dream, Amon Duul, Kluster, and Popol Vuh, with a specific focus, as the title suggests, on Kraftwerk, with many of their albums given extensive coverage. The influence these groups had on later music, from 80's synthpop to 90's electronica and beyond, is thoroughly dissected. At 3 hours long, this will prove too much for many viewers, and the film's over reliance on talking-head testimony can make for a dry experience, but I'm a fan of the genre, so I enjoyed the presentation. 7/10

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41 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I saw it scheduled and it gave me pause....

The few times I saw it was on SVENGOOLIE, and seemed more fitting there or on the newer COMET channel. It usually cracks me up.  

Now, should I somehow be offended by your query?   Or was there some other reason you asked?

Sepiatone

No offense intended.  I just happened to notice that you may have enjoyed this picture. 

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STORM IN A TEACUP 1937 by Victor Saville.Good comedy set in Scotland with Rex Harrison Vivien Leigh & a good supporting cast including Arthur Wontner-who made 4 or 5 movies as Sherlock Holmes-a good one-before Rathbone-story involves a reporter, a dog & an ambitious politician, I do not know if this film was ever shown on TCM. 7/10

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Beast of the City (1932)

This one has been up onDemand for a while now and I had been ignoring it. I don't know if I would call it the best 30s gangster film, but I really enjoyed it. There is some depth to the characters, it doesn't overstay its welcome, and it's one of the most brutal pre-codes I have seen. This was also my 6th 1932 film I have watched in the past two weeks. For some reason, 1932 has become one of my most prolific years for films. 

Lights of New York (1928)

Continuing my theme of watching pre-noir crime films, and films that I have been sitting onDemand for weeks, I decided on the first ever all-talking film. I barely paid attention throughout this, because it's just not very good at all. I think it's worth a watch from a historical perspective, though. 

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The Yellow Handkerchief (2008) - Indie road movie about a just-released ex-con (William Hurt) and a love-scorned teenager (Kristen Stewart) who hitch a ride through southern Louisiana with a twitchy weirdo (Eddie Redmayne). Also with Maria Bello. This is less quirky than many indie road flicks (of which there are many), although Redmayne, who I think is supposed to be endearingly eccentric, instead comes across as creepy and irritating. The last act undoes much of the previous hour's charm.  6/10

MV5BMTgyNTk2NzU1OV5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNTY2     Kristen+Stewart+Yellow+Handkerchief.jpg

 

 

The Countess (2009) - French actress Julie Delpy directs and stars in this costume biopic of the infamous Hungarian 16th/17th century noblewoman Erzebet Bathory, whose fear of aging leads her to sanguine pursuits. Also featuring Daniel Bruhl as the lost love of her life, and William Hurt as his disapproving father. The historical accuracy is uncertain (many historians now believe that she was falsely maligned by her contemporaries), but this telling of the tale doesn't shrink from the more unsavory aspects, frequently going over the line into horror territory, although not to the outlandish extent of Countess Dracula (1970).  6/10

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We took the advice offered here and ditched TWIN PEAKS. Thank goodness there is a lot available during this "stay at home" period. We watched WAIT UNTIL DARK on MOVIES yesterday. It was great. I know we had seen it before, but we didn't remember much about it. Aside from getting to see one of my adolescent crushes (Audrey Hepburn), the other actors and the plot lines were very entertaining.  I thought Richard Crenna was especially good as the crooked con man with some compassion. Although it was not directed by Hitchcock I thought a lot of his signature elements were present.

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Se7en (1995)

Dark, despairing crime drama about two detectives, one a thoughtful veteran nearing retirement (Morgan Freeman), the other a hot headed rookie (Brad Pitt) on the hunt for a serial killer of particularly grisly murders whose motive for them, the Seven Deadly Sins, is a sort of perverted sermon to the world.

This in an unusually intelligent treatment of familiar crime territory that stands apart from other films of this kind. Instead of big flashy action sequences (there will be one big action scene in the middle of the film) it is a deliberately paced thriller by director David Fincher, often set in an oppressively dark world in which the only lights illuminating it are from the flashlights held by the detectives investigating a crime scene. The one light of hope in this generally bleak film comes from Gwyneth Paltrow as Pitt's young bride.

Pitt and Morgan both deliver excellent performances as the detectives who are a compete contrast to one another, Morgan, in particular, benefiting from some fine dialogue. But the bleakness of the world which Morgan laments and from which he wants to escape seems to be the message of the film itself.

The final half hour of the film holds a couple of surprises that make it unusual for serial killer films and which I didn't see coming. The film does not graphically dwell upon the crimes themselves (for which I was grateful) but still provides the viewer with enough glimpses of those scenes to effectively convey the nauseating nature of them.

Se7en is an extremely well constructed crime film but it won't be for everybody. I would recommend it for those into crime films but you will not walk away from a viewing this film feeling uplifted.

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3 out of 4

 

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20 hours ago, Janet0312 said:

No offense intended.  I just happened to notice that you may have enjoyed this picture. 

Well, I DID say it cracked me up, so yes, I enjoyed it.  Just not that morning as I didn't tune in for it on TCM.  It was a regular feature for decades on many local late Saturday night "Creature Features" through the mid '60's to early '80's.    I've seen it both straight, and in a variety of "altered states".  ;) 

Sepiatone

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20 hours ago, YourManGodfrey said:

Lights of New York (1928)

Continuing my theme of watching pre-noir crime films, and films that I have been sitting onDemand for weeks, I decided on the first ever all-talking film. I barely paid attention throughout this, because it's just not very good at all. I think it's worth a watch from a historical perspective, though. 

Oh, come on, who cannot love Lights of New York! The wooden dialogue. The mixed metaphors. The wooden actors. And that wild eyed emcee in the nightclub scene singing "Dawning". I am not being snarky. For the film historian this is essential viewing. Did you know this film was supposed to be a Vitaphone short until it accidentally grew to 58 minutes in length while Jack Warner was out of town?  He was furious until the bucks began rolling in. This film and "The Singing Fool" released in September 1928 were  what propelled the other studios to talking film.  "The Jazz Singer" was just looked at as a novelty. It was a big hit, but it did not propel anybody towards transitioning to talking film.

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I’m on a crime spree (sorry, I couldn’t resist):

The Burglar’s Dilemma (1912)
A Biograph short starting a younger Lionel Barrymore and featuring the two Gish sisters. It runs at about 15 minutes and is worth watching at that length. 

Battling Butler (1926)
My 9th Buster Keaton film and there’s truly no other actor like him. This film is almost a dramedy in some respects and is very well put together. I was laughing out loud a handful of times throughout. 

After Office Hours (1935)

Mid-30s Clark Gable is my favorite Clark Gable. This story has some gaping plot holes, but his performance in this is one of my favorite Gable performances. If you like fast-talking newspapermen in films, check this one out.

Truck Busters (1943) 

TCM’s Saturday B crime films are one of my favorite features. This one has the issues any B film has, but the story about independent truckers vs. a big corporation is filled with action from start to finish, and it comes in at under an hour. It’s worth watching if you’re short on time and looking for action.

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10 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

We took the advice offered here and ditched TWIN PEAKS. 

We didn't say "Ditch it", we said "Ditch it after they finally figure out Laura Palmer's killer."

(I'd have said "Ditch it after the first season", but the second-season opener has its good moments too.)

If you've at least gotten through S1:E3, "Zen & the Art of Catching a Killer", you've gotten your minimum requirement of Iconic TV History.

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Pillow to Post (1945) Ida Lupino in a delightful comedy. Ida in a comedy? That struck me and my curiosity was so great that I stopped watching in the early moments and googled the film to find sure enough that this was her only leading lady comedy of her career. And she was a good comedian in the sense that she was very cute albeit lacking perhaps in extreme comedic acting chops that many "real" comediennes have as they have been trained to have. The war is on and on her way to work she sees a billboard asking, "What are you doing for the war effort?" She does a cute double take in the mildly guilty mode. The cab driver says something similar to her and she another cute double take. Getting out of the cab a uniformed woman hand her leaflet, "And you, what are doing to help the war effort." She finally reaches an office where her father is working and who is complaining about not getting enough people---you guessed it---to help with, well, you know. Ida plays a salesgirl who enthusiastically volunteers to help by going "over there" and push her wares. There is a problem. After getting there she finds that she must be married in order to get on a  base to do the job, etc etc. This is common idea, a girl finding a man to pretend being her husband (or vice versa), "just for a  while, you know."  Although I've said a lot (sorta), there are really no spoilers so far because everything up to hear was a fairly rapid process, and the spouse hunt is when the story picks up steam. And I doubt I am giving anything away by stating that they will, you know, probably end falling in love. These sorts of stories always end this way. Ida again has some cute moments while selling her other wares, her considerable charms, one of which she gets a little tipsy in the grand effort to, uh, land him. But there is not dark strategy, it's just real girl who has fallen in love in spite of herself. Very cute, Ida. Sidney Greenstreet plays the commander of the base and the supervisor of the faux husband. He is all light and nice, against type. He is okay. So is William Prince, who plays the "other half." I don't know him, in fact I had to see a cast list to even remember his name. And while there I saw Robert Blake (!) in the cast list. Gosh, I had no idea. Of course he is rather young so he could be easily not recognized, at least by me. The overall starts rather contained but seems to evolve into more and more of the zany and the screwball. I sure recommend it.

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Emergency viewing due to the last few days of Amazon Prime membership, I watched the FUZZY PINK NIGHTGOWN from 1957 starring Jane Russell, Keenan Wynn & Ralph Meeker. Solid supporting cast including Una Merkel, Adolph Menjou & Fred Clark. This movie was not well received and Russell was not fond of it. One of her comments was it would have been better in color, which I agree, the B&W added nothing to the story.

Well, I enjoyed it thoroughly. I find Jane Russell beautiful and a fiery personality, not unlike Maureen O'Hara. Russell plays a modern career woman well and it's great seeing one of my favorite pre-code gals Una Merkel as her snappy personal assistant. I mostly watched this for Meeker though, whom I find mesmerizing.

This is a simple story of a self centered movie star (Russell) who just finished a movie called "The Kidnapped Bride". Wynn & Meeker are bumbling ex-cons who kidnap her for ransom. In confinement they predictibly become friends and realize everyone will think it's a publicity stunt.

Wynn played his usual comedic sidekick who doesn't get the girl. I love Wynn anyway, he's adorable and I like his unusual voice. Meeker was his usual sexy-as-hell self, but seemed to me a little Frank Sinatra/Nathan Detroit-ish. But I was most impressed with Russell, who played a range of emotions pretty believably.  Especially when she takes the "silver mop" wig off.  She comes across as a tall woman, but looks tiny when nestled in the actors' arms. Whenever seeing the title of this movie, I imagine it stars Shelly Winters. Russell is more powerful, Winters would be too whiney & complaining in the role. 

So agreed, it's not a blockbuster movie, but I enjoyed it. 

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