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Why Girls Love Sailors Poster

Why Girls Love Sailors (1927) Youtube 6/10

A shy fisherman's (Stan Laurel) fiancee is kidnapped by an nasty sea captain.

This is an amusing silent short though interesting mainly as a curio. Oliver Hardy appears as a bullying first mate of the ship, L&H do not work as a team and only have one good scene together. This is only the sixth film in which they appeared together, before they became strictly a duo. In my book "The Films Of Laurel And Hardy" by William K Everson (published in 1967) this was considered a lost film. It was later rediscovered in 1971. The book  in error says Hardy plays the captain, this role is portrayed by Malcolm Waite, who had been in Chaplin's The Gold Rush. In the film, Laurel disguises himself in drag, (which he did several times in later films) to distract the captain and crew while he tries to save his girl. The one scene L&H have together is when Stan, dressed in his dame costume tries to "vamp" Ollie. So if there are any fans of the team who want to see something interesting and unusual from them, check this out on Youtube.

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in the past- i have pretty much always managed to bypass PRESCRIBED POP CULTURE- you know, that movie/tv show you simply MUST see because mentions of it are just about everywhere- I HAVE AN INHERENT DISTRUST OF THEM AND WHEN I DO SEE THEM FINALLY, I VERY OFTEN DON'T LIKE THEM.

That said, under these new circumstances in which we find ourselves confined, I started watched THE TIGER KING ON NETFLIX, which is a SORT OF "true crime" doc, longform ersatz visual podcast, unironic true-life rendering of IDIOCRACY by either a profoundly gifted local theater troupe or a bunch of genuine whackos.

i actually quit watching it two eps in, BUT SINCE I CAN'T GO ANYWHERE and I COULD NOT FIND ANYTHING I WANTED TO SEE, I went back and finished it.

I don't trust or like NETFLIX, going all the way back to that DUN-DUNH! sound that comes out at THE AUDIENCE IS LISTENING VOLUME ALL OF A SUDDEN AND WITH NO WARNING and scares the **** out of me if i dont remember to MUTE THE TV.

it was watchable enough though I suppose.

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1 hour ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

 

Why Girls Love Sailors (1927) Youtube 6/10

A shy fisherman's (Stan Laurel) fiancee is kidnapped by an nasty sea captain.

This is an amusing silent short though interesting mainly as a curio. Oliver Hardy appears as a bullying first mate of the ship, L&H do not work as a team and only have one good scene together. This is only the sixth film in which they appeared together, before they became strictly a duo. In my book "The Films Of Laurel And Hardy" by William K Everson (published in 1967) this was considered a lost film. It was later rediscovered in 1971. The book  in error says Hardy plays the captain, this role is portrayed by Malcolm Waite, who had been in Chaplin's The Gold Rush. In the film, Laurel disguises himself in drag, (which he did several times in later films) to distract the captain and crew while he tries to save his girl. The one scene L&H have together is when Stan, dressed in his dame costume tries to "vamp" Ollie. So if there are any fans of the team who want to see something interesting and unusual from them, check this out on Youtube.

William K. Everson was a great writer who really instilled a lot of interest in films for me as a kid. His book, The Bad Guys, is the first film book I ever purchased and remains a favourite. I also have his Laurel and Hardy book, as well as The Detective in Film, another great read. The only criticism I would have of Everson is that sometimes in his colourful and dry humour recollection of a scene in a film he gets his facts wrong on occasion (possibly because he hadn't seen the film in years). But his love and enthusiasm for old films is infectious.

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4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Touchez Pas Au Grisbi (1954)  from me a 9.75/10 but see below...

Touchez Pas au Grisbi Poster

To quote Moorman " Another French masterpiece.  A solid 10 out of 10. Jean Gabin is fantastic.  I really loved this film.  The moral code, the friendship, everything about this film was top notch and on point.  The character studies and just everything, again, I say this was a 10 out of 10."
 

I watched that one in the last couple of years, and loved it, as well.

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3 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

I watched that one in the last couple of years, and loved it, as well.

I also watched this a few years back (twice),  when TCM showed it.      I had to google this and read about the plot since the French title didn't trigger a memory (but as soon as I read about gold bars I knew it was this film).

Yea,   one of my favorite foreign language films.      I hope TCM shows this again.  

Oh,  and I didn't know until today that the leading actress in the film,   Marilyn Burerd was a U.C.L.A grad,   Miss California and then Miss American (1946),  defeating Cloris Leachman.     I just assumed Marilyn was raised in France.       

Miss America 1946, Marilyn Buferd | Miss america, Miss, America

     

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

in the past- i have pretty much always managed to bypass PRESCRIBED POP CULTURE- you know, that movie/tv show you simply MUST see because mentions of it are just about everywhere- I HAVE AN INHERENT DISTRUST OF THEM AND WHEN I DO SEE THEM FINALLY, I VERY OFTEN DON'T LIKE THEM.

That said, under these new circumstances in which we find ourselves confined, I started watched THE TIGER KING ON NETFLIX, which is a SORT OF "true crime" doc, longform ersatz visual podcast, unironic true-life rendering of IDIOCRACY by either a profoundly gifted local theater troupe or a bunch of genuine whackos.

i actually quit watching it two eps in, BUT SINCE I CAN'T GO ANYWHERE and I COULD NOT FIND ANYTHING I WANTED TO SEE, I went back and finished it.

I don't trust or like NETFLIX, going all the way back to that DUN-DUNH! sound that comes out at THE AUDIENCE IS LISTENING VOLUME ALL OF A SUDDEN AND WITH NO WARNING and scares the **** out of me if i dont remember to MUTE THE TV.

it was watchable enough though I suppose.

Believe it or not there’s been quite a bit of discussion of the Netflix Tiger King series on the sports talk radio station I listen to, and it sounds like a completely crazy story (not much actual sports to talk about these days).  Living in the South, most of the types of characters involved are somewhat familiar but it’s hard to imagine how things can be taken to such extremes.  With all that coverage, I now don’t feel compelled to watch the series and can take their word for the lunacy.

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2 minutes ago, cmovieviewer said:

Believe it or not there’s been quite a bit of discussion of the Netflix Tiger King series on the sports talk radio station I listen to, and it sounds like a completely crazy story (not much actual sports to talk about these days).  Living in the South, most of the types of characters involved are somewhat familiar but it’s hard to imagine how things can be taken to such extremes.  With all that coverage, I now don’t feel compelled to watch the series and can take their word for the lunacy.

Would that be The Ticket in DFW, by any chance?  I already knew this story from following the mess in the news over the past two years, so I don't need to see the crazy people in action.

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Voici le temps des assassins... aka Deadlier Than the Male (1956)

Deadlier Than the Male Poster

Another great French Film Noir Directed by Julien Duvivier, with Jean Gabin, Danièle Delorme, and Robert Arnoux . 

The long-divorced André Chatelin,  a restauranter, is visited by an unknown young woman. She says she is Catherine, the daughter of his ex-wife Gabrielle, who has died leaving her homeless and penniless. André gives her a room and a job. But Catherine is not what she seems.  She causes problems between André and his young  medical student friend Gérard, and she also starts stealing money to support her mother, who is not really dead but an ex-prostitute who is now a hopeless drug addict in a sleazy flop house.  She gets André to marry her then seduces Gérard telling him that André is abusing her.  Things don't go as she plans.  7/10

 

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@TomJH:  I wish you luck in your hunt to dig out your disc of MURDER AT THE VANITIES (1934).  It may not be as outrageous as "Wonder Bar", but it's still got the whole Pre-Code 'vibe' going on.  Check out those skimpy costumes the ladies are wearing + the weird SWEET MARIJUANA song.  Jack Oakie is up to his neck is chorus girls, backstage mayhem and ornery detective Victor McLaglen.  Carl Brisson and Kitty Carlisle also star.  Worth at least 1 viewing. 

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17 hours ago, TomJH said:

It was from an old DVD recording I made off TCM years ago. I'm not certain how frequently they show Wonder Bar anymore since it's so politically incorrect.

I think the last time it aired was when Richard Barrios hosted the "Gay Images on Film" series, or whatever it was called, which I believe was back in 2007.  And when you're talking about the tastelessness of it, don't forget Jolson reading a Yiddish newspaper in the "Goin' to Heaven on a Mule" number.

Oddly enough, the movie I find myself most comparing Wonder Bar to is... Thank God It's Friday{/b].

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Across the Pacific (1942)

I really enjoyed this WWII-era spy triller with Bogart, Astor, and Greenstreet. I felt like the script wasn’t the greatest at some points, but there was great chemistry between all of the actors, especially Bogie and Astor. All of the WWII-era spy films are thinly veiled propaganda pieces, but I find them enjoyable to watch. 

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19 hours ago, YourManGodfrey said:

Across the Pacific (1942)

I really enjoyed this WWII-era spy triller with Bogart, Astor, and Greenstreet. I felt like the script wasn’t the greatest at some points, but there was great chemistry between all of the actors, especially Bogie and Astor. All of the WWII-era spy films are thinly veiled propaganda pieces, but I find them enjoyable to watch. 

Note that the ending was directed by Vincent Sherman.   I'm reading John Huston: Courage and Art,  by Jeffery Meyers:

Huston was called in for military service before completing the film.   In An Open Book,  Huston portrayed himself as a cheeky rebel and hyperbolically wrote, "I proceeded to make things as difficult as possible for my successor.    I had Bogie tied to a chair, and installed about 3 times as many Japanese soldiers as were needed to keep him prisoner.     I made it so that there was no way in God's green world that Bogart could logically escape.    I shot the scene, then called Jack Warner and said "Jack,  I'm on my way.  I'm in the Army.  Bogie will know how to get out".

In fact ,  WB production files reveal that Huston - more professional than prankster - was actually given a week's notice and made all the arrangements for a smooth transition.

 Sherman directed the final scene as a "James Bond fantasy".    When someone questioned the logic of the scene, Sherman exclaimed "Listen, if you ask me, we were lucky to get that bastard out of there at all!   

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5 hours ago, cmovieviewer said:

Believe it or not there’s been quite a bit of discussion of the Netflix Tiger King series on the sports talk radio station I listen to, and it sounds like a completely crazy story (not much actual sports to talk about these days).  Living in the South, most of the types of characters involved are somewhat familiar but it’s hard to imagine how things can be taken to such extremes.  With all that coverage, I now don’t feel compelled to watch the series and can take their word for the lunacy.

It’s mostly set in OKLAHOMA- Which is sort of a unique state... It’s not really the south or the Midwest or the south west- It stands alone in terms of geographical grouping, like Maryland and the FREAK STATES (Alaska and Hawaii.)
However, there are parts that take place in Myrtle Beach South Carolina and I can 100% vouch that town is NUTS.

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10 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Touchez Pas Au Grisbi (1954)  from me a 9.75/10 but see below...

Touchez Pas au Grisbi Poster

To quote Moorman " Another French masterpiece.  A solid 10 out of 10. Jean Gabin is fantastic.  I really loved this film.  The moral code, the friendship, everything about this film was top notch and on point.  The character studies and just everything, again, I say this was a 10 out of 10."

Un Témoin Dans La Ville (1959) - 10/10

Un témoin dans la ville Poster

Directed by Edouard Molinaro starring Lino Ventura.

Pierre Verdier kills his mistress Jeanne Ancelin by throwing her off a train. He claims that it was an accident. Her husband, Ancelin (Ventura), gets revenge on Verdier who has money enough to get acquitted by justice. Ancelin waits for him at his his house and hangs him making it look like suicide.

He leaves the place but is seen by a cab driver that Verdier had called, Now  But unfortunately for him, Lambert, a taxi driver has witnessed him. Ancelin has no option but to bump off the driver. This was a nice surprise. Lots of cat and mouse type action on the night streets of Paris. A great Film Noir 10/10.
 

I love Touchez pas au grisbi. On first viewing I was expecting more of an action crime film, but the second time through the character study clicked in and the film just worked from beginning to end. Where did you see Un temoin dans la ville (A Witness in the City)? I'd like to see that one.

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Thanks to a recent health scare, I've decided to begin re-watching movies from my collection as a sort of "my life in movies" review. Since I can't just grab any old movie off the shelf and watch it like a normal person, I've decided to go genre by genre, and in year order. I'll post what I've watched here, with some commentary, depending on my inspiration and energy level. First up, since it's a grim time generally, and even more specifically in my home, I've naturally chosen Horror.

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) Dir: Robert Wiene - German silent about a series of grisly murders that occur in a small village. The crimes began soon after the arrival of a strange hypnotist and showman (Werner Krauss) and his "companion", a somnambulist (Conrad Veidt).

The set design is the star, with extreme angles and deliberate artificiality. The image of the pallid somnambulist lurking in the twisty alleyways of the town is one of early cinema's most memorable. I watched the Kino Blu-ray, which has as near a perfect print of the movie as one could hope for.    (9/10)

cabinet.jpg

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The Golem (1920) Dir: Paul Wegener & Carl Boese - German silent historical fantasy about an elder rabbi and mystic (Albert Steinruck) who creates a man (Paul Wegener) out of clay called "the Golem", to protect the Ghetto against a pogrom ordered by the anti-Semitic court of the Emperor. 

This has more excellent, evocative set work. I especially liked the giant village gates, and the cluttered, twisting study of the rabbi. The horror aspects of this are negligible,  but the title creature prefigures Frankenstein's monster, as well as the innumerable robots-gone-wrong in subsequent sci-fi/horror offerings. Wegener, who had already appeared in an early version of the oft-filmed supernatural tale The Student of Prague, was also previously in two other Golem films.   (7/10)

Source: Kino DVD

still_0_3_790x398.jpg

golem+gate.jpg

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20 hours ago, TomJH said:

The Bad Guys, is the first film book I ever purchased and remains a favourite

I never purchased this one, but I recall seeing it in bookstores. I remember thumbing through it and one of the chapters that caught my eye was "The Psychos" which featured the crazy scary villains like Robert Mitchum in Night Of The Hunter and Anthony Perkins in Psycho.

Classics Of The Horror Film was another of his movie books that I wish I had.

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1 hour ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I never purchased this one, but I recall seeing it in bookstores. I remember thumbing through it and one of the chapters that caught my eye was "The Psychos" which featured the crazy scary villains like Robert Mitchum in Night Of The Hunter and Anthony Perkins in Psycho.

Classics Of The Horror Film was another of his movie books that I wish I had.

I just took a look through my film books and found that I have Classics of the Horror Film as well as More Classics of the Horror Film, also by Everson, both solid books for the fans.

The Bad Guys, as you said, is broken up into various chapters devoted to different villains, with chapter heads such as The Civilized Heavies (Greenstreet, Clifton Webb, etc), The Swashbucklers (Basil Rathbone,  the latter a favourite Everson heavy, Noah Beery), The Hooded Killers (from old dark house thrillers and serials), The Monsters (with an emphasis upon Universal's horror cycle of the '30s and '40s), etc., etc. There are also, of course, as with all Everson books, a huge collection of mouth watering photos.

Just to show posters the flair of Everson's writing, here's his write up on Leslie Banks as Zaroff in The Most Dangerous Game:

"The tightest, fastest 68 minutes ever put on film, it was a spell binding tale about a mad hunter who deliberately causes ships to be wrecked off his island fortress, so that he may have human game to hunt in his private jungle. Stroking the jagged scar on his forehead, sitting down at the piano to launch into a tormented concerto, Banks was every inch the detached connoisseur of killing, his every sentence a masterpiece of construction and understatement in imparting dignity and a civilized veneer to the "barbaric" sport he has devised. "It is only after the kill that man revels!" he remarks as one point, a casual cutaway to Fay Wray's heaving bosom leaving no doubt as to the revels in mind!

I hadn't seen The Most Dangerous Game when I first read this. Is there any doubt why I was dying to see it after reading Everson's colourful account?

A1kxgvT-K6L.jpg

I was surprised to see that there are paperback versions of The Bad Guys, originally released in 1964, available on Amazon, one used copy for as low as $1.39! Now that's a bargain, though who knows the condition! There are other used ones for $10, a more than reasonable price, and there are also new copies of the book for considerably more.

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18 hours ago, Fedya said:

I think the last time it aired was when Richard Barrios hosted the "Gay Images on Film" series, or whatever it was called, which I believe was back in 2007.  And when you're talking about the tastelessness of it, don't forget Jolson reading a Yiddish newspaper in the "Goin' to Heaven on a Mule" number.

Oddly enough, the movie I find myself most comparing Wonder Bar to is... Thank God It's Friday{/b].

Yep, Wonder Bar was last shown in June 2007 during the Gay Images in Film series, but it was on at 3AM. That's when I recorded it. It was one of the last precodes. And oddly enough about the only thing that would have been OK with the censors in that film is the "Going To Heaven On A Mule" number.

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Do Detectives Think? Poster

Do Detectives Think? (1927) Youtube 6/10

A judge (James Finlayson) sentences The Throat Slasher to death, the maniac vows to escape and come after the judge.

Of course the killer escapes and the judge asks for protection and Laurel and Hardy are the detectives assigned to guard him. While this silent short is not one of the best L&H films it is a significant one. It is the first time they are working as a team and acting and looking the way we remember them best. They wear the bowler hats and ill fitting suits they were famous for and their personalities are set up with Stan being dim witted and Ollie being pompous. This is the first time we see the gag where they constantly give each other the wrong hats. 

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I MARRIED A WITCH 1942 René Clair,it played 10 days ago on TCM,I had seen it many many years ago so it was new! Funny story! i like Veronica Lake a lot,i think she was talented,i like her voice too.Susan Hayward in an early role is excellent as the abrasive fiancée of Fredric March. March was 46 when the movie was made .In my opinion he looked too old for the part and was odious with Lake on the set.She lived in Montreal in the 60's,7 years ago  I was identifying a lady on the phone when I asked her her mother's name  she said Veronica Lake.It is not reported she had a child in the 50's or 60's but it is possible.I believed the lady -she was surprised when I told her I was very familiar but I digress,it is an excellent film by René Clair with very good special effects for the period. 8/10

lake.jpg

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3 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Do Detectives Think? Poster

Do Detectives Think? (1927) Youtube 6/10

A judge (James Finlayson) sentences The Throat Slasher to death, the maniac vows to escape and come after the judge.

Of course the killer escapes and the judge asks for protection and Laurel and Hardy are the detectives assigned to guard him. While this silent short is not one of the best L&H films it is a significant one. It is the first time they are working as a team and acting and looking the way we remember them best. They wear the bowler hats and ill fitting suits they were famous for and their personalities are set up with Stan being dim witted and Ollie being pompous. This is the first time we see the gag where they constantly give each other the wrong hats. 

I'm a big fan of Oliver Hardy, not that I don't appreciate Stan, as well. One of my favourite Ollie schticks are those moments when he is going to chase someone (usually Stan). Oliver screws up his face in anger than pumps his legs up and down on the same spot for two to three seconds before he finally takes off. It's like he has to rev himself up before he can go.

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Dedee d'Anvers (1948) Director Yves Allegret. French Film Noir


MV5BZWY0ZTQxMTYtZmFjNi00ZDkxLTkyMTMtOTE2

As kingrat mentioned to me  it's -The film that put Simone Signoret on the map, with Marcello Pagliero, Bernard Blier, and Marcel Dalio. Dedee (Signoret) is a popular prostitute working Mr. Rene's (Blier), nightclub in Antwerp's red light district. She sleeps with her pimp Marco (Dalio). Marco is in debt to a gangster and pushes Dedee to pull more tricks. Francesco an Italian ship captain falls in love with her and promises to take her with him. Marco gets desperate. It's got quite a surprising ending. Good story and nice cinematography. Signoret looks a lot like Lauren Bacall in this. 7/10
 


 

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23 minutes ago, TomJH said:

It's like he has to rev himself up before he can go.

Another great example of this is in Saps At Sea (1940) when he works himself into a frenzy when he hears the sound of horns.

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Appointment with Death (1988) - 👍

v1.bTsxMTU1NTMxMTtqOzE4NDQ4OzEyMDA7NjEyO

I'd been searching for this one, since it'd dropped between the cracks, right between the last big-screen period-setting all-star Agatha Christie of Evil Under the Sun (1983), and the later contemporary late-80's TV-movie Hercule Poirot adaptations on Warner Archive.  Nobody seems to remember that in between, there was a brief, unnoticed period where the formerly big-budget Christies had been reduced to international Golan/Globus productions (there was also reportedly a "Ten Little Indians" relocated to an African lodge), and with Cannon Pictures now joining the MGM/Orion orphans on streaming, I finally ran across this one on PlutoTV's on-demand catalog.  It's serviceable--Loyal Christie fans don't consider it one of the better Poirots, and it doesn't have the filtered opulence of the original '74 Murder on the Orient Express or the winking 30's humor of "Evil", it's more somewhere in the middle, like the '78 Death on the Nile on a Golan/Globus budget. 

The mystery here has Peter Ustinov's Poirot investigating a murder on a Middle Eastern tourist archeological dig (yep, Menahem Golan had to pick the one story he could film in Israel), with Piper Laurie--still in "Twin Peaks" Catherine Martell mode--typecast as a wicked-stepmother matriarch who ends up as the victim, with Carrie Fisher, Jenny Seagrove, and a grown-up Haley Mills among the suspects, John Gielgud showing up as the usual spear-carrier, and Lauren Bacall repeating her "Orient Express" typecasting as the Comic-Relief Loudmouth American.  But even serviceable Agatha Christie still looks good on a period budget...The only complaint is Ustinov:  Yes, he's not David Suchet, and he's not Albert Finney, and while he's lovable and cuddly, he's not much of a Hercule Poirot, either.  Ustinov spends much of his time being lovably cowardly, fussy and preening--and er, aha, avoiding anything dangerous--and not the "Irritating little man" of Christie's books who offhandedly brags about his genius and constantly annoys innocent suspects by suspecting everyone.

Even watching it for the sake of completism, it's still a fun diversion.  Now, I should probably look up "Nile" again, now that it's hit orphan-streaming, I don't quite remember that one as well as the others.

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