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4 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

THE INK SPOTS are wonderful. It's very difficult to stay in a bad mood when THE INK SPOTS ARE ON.

Maybe during the lockdown you can work on a spec script for a BEACH PARTY WOMEN IN PRISON MOVIE- ie ANNETTE goes to THE PHILLIPINES to watch FRANKIE AND THE GANG catch some curls, then they have  A SILLY LOVER'S MISUNDERSTANDING and she leaves IN A HUFF. At the airport, she,  her friend "Gidge" and her PAULA PRENTISS-esque other friend (the JAMIE LEE CURTIS ROLE) agree to carry a suitcase. and the next thing you know, they're being CAVITY SEARCHED by PAM GRIER. 

 

Somehow in all of this, we'd have to figure out how to make Annette mad at Frankie--as that is the basic plot of all the Beach party movies.  Then we need to work the dancing lady with the fringe dress into the plot too. 

Gidge will undoubtedly become cow-eyed over one of the prison guards, much to the chagrin of paramour Moondoggie, who after 10 years, still seems to be an undergrad in college for some reason (Get it together Moondoggie). 

The Paula Prentiss-esque friend will need a Jim Hutton-esque boyfriend on the inside who could help the girls escape from prison. 

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15 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

The Paula Prentiss-esque friend will need a Jim Hutton-esque boyfriend LESBIAN LOVER on the inside who could help the girls escape from prison. 

 

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Gas-Oil aka Hi-Jack Highway (1955)  

Hi-Jack Highway Poster

Director: Gilles Grangier, with stars Jean Gabin, Jeanne Moreau, Gaby Basse, Simone Berthier, Charles Bouillaud, and Marcel Bozzuffi. 

 A nice French Noir story that can easily fit in with They Drive by Night (1940), Thieves' Highway (1949) Hell Drivers (1957) and The Long Haul (1957). It's about truck drivers on the haul between Paris and Auvergne in Central France.  A group of gangsters rob a  messenger service of a 50 million francs. They use two cars for the job one to block the messenger the other to block it from backing up. They gun down the guards and three men take off in one car in one direction while the driver of other car in the rear grabs the briefcase with the loot. He switches cars.  The first three gangsters wait at a rendezvous but the man with the loot never shows up.  He does show up on a dark rainy night when we see his body pushed from a car.

Jean Chape (Gabin) a trucker, after sleeping over at his gal pal Anne's house (Moreau) , gets in his truck and while  driving his route, runs over the body of the already dead gangster. He calls the police who immediately impound his truck.  Soon the widow of the dead man and his gangster buddies begin to harass Jean believing he has the stolen money.  Jean rallies his teamster buddies to deal with them. 7/10

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12 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

!

It's okay though, sometimes I see stuff everyone else loves and for whatever inscrutable reason I am "meh" on it.

The acting in RASHOMAN is exceptional- not just from MIFUNE, but also (AND I AM SORRY THAT I AM TOO LAZY TO GOOGLE HER NAME) from THE ACTRESS who plays the possibly murderous possibly innocent young wife- I am VERY RESERVED when it comes to giving OSCAR NOMINATIONS for acting in FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILMS (it needs to be exceptional) but she merited serious consideration in whatever year RASHOMAN would've been eligible. 

Machiko Kyo is her name. She was also in The Teahouse of the August Moon and died last year. If you haven't seen it, that's a funny film with Glenn Ford and Marlon Brando. I stopped relying on reviews to determine what I watch, because I will oftentimes enjoy a movie with horrible reviews more than an essential classic. 

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Pale Flower (1964)

Unfortunately, I didn't get around to watching Red Beard before it expired. I watched the first 15 minutes, and thought it was good, but couldn't find the time to watch a 3 hour film. I did, however, watch another Japanese film, Pale Flower. I didn't pay as much as attention as I should have, because I missed some of the dialogue, but I felt like I needed to continue my Japanese film streak that I started. I have been enjoying Japanese films so much that when I originally started a Bogart film, I turned it off, because I needed something Japanese. It was a little bit abstract and meandering, which Eddie Muller points out, but I thought it was interesting. I think Pale Flower is my first foreign noir, so I guess that counts for something. I liked the scenes with Muraki and Saeko a lot. I thought Ikebe and Kaga had two good performances. I need to dig more into the Yakuza sub-genre. 

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When a Stranger Calls Poster

When A Stranger Calls (1979) Showtime channel 7/10

A child killing maniac terrorizes a babysitter with phone calls, he later escapes from a mental institution.

I just re-watched this after many years, it is still effective. The first part with Carol Kane (she had received an Oscar nomination  4 years before with Hester Street)  as the babysitter has become a classic in horror films. The middle part has often been criticized but I think it is still quite good as we get to know the killer a bit more and see the pursuit of him. And then the finale is a real nail biter. Film buffs will also like the cast- Charles Durning is an ex cop turned private eye who is hired to track down the killer. Rachel Roberts has a small part as a psychiatrist. Colleen Dewhurst is a middle aged barfly. Ron (Superfly) O'Neal plays Durning's former partner on the police force. A special mention for Tony Beckley as the maniac, he is both terrifying and somehow pathetic. Sadly, this was his last role, he was terminally ill with cancer at the time and died a few months after the release.

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4 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

When a Stranger Calls Poster

 

I just re-watched this after many years, it is still effective. The first part with Carol Kane (she had received an Oscar nomination  4 years before with Hester Street)  as the babysitter has become a classic in horror films. 

I hadn't seen Carol Kane in quite awhile until she showed up in THE HUNTERS with Al Pacino. I just always remember her role in the TV show Taxi as Andy Kaufman's character's girlfriend. 

 

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Female (1933) pretty chauvinistic story line on this one looking at it from today's  society norms, I guess some folks would say it was back when America was Great, lol.  

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Just now, cigarjoe said:

Female (1933) pretty chauvinistic story line on this one looking at it from today's  society norms, I guess some folks would say back it was back when America was Great, lol.  

Some folks may have watched only the first 15 minutes (where it appears this will be a feminist story).     But the ending,,,,  gag me.   

Still Ruth Chatterton is worth watching. 

 

 

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10 hours ago, YourManGodfrey said:

 I have been enjoying Japanese films so much that when I originally started a Bogart film, I turned it off, because I needed something Japanese. It was a little bit abstract and meandering, which Eddie Muller points out, but I thought it was interesting. I think Pale Flower is my first foreign noir, so I guess that counts for something. I liked the scenes with Muraki and Saeko a lot. I thought Ikebe and Kaga had two good performances. I need to dig more into the Yakuza sub-genre. 

These are not of Yakuza and some of them are quite long but they are the first ones to come to my mind to recommend to someone who wishes to explore Japanese cinema:

A Page of Madness (1926)
Kagemusha (1980)
The Lady and the Beard (1931)
My Neighbor Totoro (1993)
Black Lizard (1968)
The End of Summer (1961)
Woman in the Dunes (1964)
A Story of Floating Weeds (1934)
The Rickshaw Man (1958)
Late Autumn (1960)
Diary of a Mad Old Man (1962)
Only Yesterday (1991)
Chichi ariki (1942)
Kwaidan (1964)
The Woman Who Touched the Legs (1960)
I Am Waiting (1957)

 

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The Ink Spots. Pardon My Sarong, an Abbott and Costello vehicle peppered with music and a couple songs from the incredible Ink Spots.  Awesome. Do I worry?

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Saw much of and am going to finish up Hatari which is a fine adventure saga. Saw Starman before bed last night, and it was such a beautiful film.

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He Walked by Night (1948)

I'm not usually into these procedural/semi-documentary style films, but this one was very enjoyable. Some of the other semi-documentary films I've watched seem to get bogged down in the narration, but this one struck the perfect balance between narration and story. I really liked Scott Brady's performance in this. It's not the greatest acting you will ever see, but he fits the noir tough guy mold perfectly. He reminded me a bit of Lawrence Tierney. 

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7 minutes ago, YourManGodfrey said:

He reminded me a bit of Lawrence Tierney. 

You do know he was Lawrence Tierney's brother, right?

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2 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

You do know he was Lawrence Tierney's brother, right?

I didn't and never heard of him until this film. 😂 The next thing I know, you'll be telling me George Sanders and Tom Conway were brothers! 

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6 hours ago, SansFin said:

These are not of Yakuza and some of them are quite long but they are the first ones to come to my mind to recommend to someone who wishes to explore Japanese cinema:

My Neighbor Totoro (1993)

Well, if you're going to include Studio Ghibli on the list of Japanese Films, the Miyazaki "trilogy" is generally considered to be My Neighbor Totoro, Kiki's Delivery Service (1989) and Spirited Away (2002).   There are others, of course, but those who are new at this must prioritize. 

(I was going to post about the Galaxy Express 999 movie streaming for free on Amazon Prime, but seems they've just removed it and left the dim sequel instead.  Oh well, at least they've still got Robot Carnival (1987), Project A-Ko (1986) and Urusei Yatsura: Beautiful Dreamer (1984).)

Quote

Kwaidan (1964)

This is a good "basic" Japanese Essential to watch alongside Kuroneko and Onibaba, since it also deals with the classic established ancient ghost-stories, but with a more abstract, full-color palette, on surreally artificial soundstages, than the other two modest-budgeted B&W films.

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4 hours ago, EricJ said:

Well, if you're going to include Studio Ghibli on the list of Japanese Films, the Miyazaki "trilogy" is generally considered to be My Neighbor Totoro, Kiki's Delivery Service (1989) and Spirited Away (2002).   There are others, of course, but those who are new at this must prioritize. 

(I was going to post about the Galaxy Express 999 movie streaming for free on Amazon Prime, but seems they've just removed it and left the dim sequel instead.  Oh well, at least they've still got Robot Carnival (1987), Project A-Ko (1986) and Urusei Yatsura: Beautiful Dreamer (1984).)

[Kwaidan (1964)]

This is a good "basic" Japanese Essential to watch alongside Kuroneko and Onibaba, since it also deals with the classic established ancient ghost-stories, but with a more abstract, full-color palette, on surreally artificial soundstages, than the other two modest-budgeted B&W films.

I am sorry to say that I am perhaps the only person in the world who does not particularly like: Spirited Away (2002). I am a great fan of Miyazaki and many consider that his pinnacle but it simply does not gel for me.

 Kwaidan (1964) seems to me to be the all-singing, all-dancing extravaganza of Japanese horror movies. I find: Kuroneko (1968) to be much more personal but that means that it may not appeal to many people. I found: Onibaba (1964) to be an excellent movie but it is not quite to my taste. 

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My favorite Miyazaki (that I've seen so far, I haven't seen all of them) is Kiki's Delivery Service (that's probably my favorite), The Secret World of Arietty, and Up on Poppy Hill.  However, I've seen a majority of them and have never been disappointed. 

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As I had previously asked folks on here does anyone have tcm on demand-(spectrum)? Anyhow, the vastly always underrated 1959 ODDS AGAINST TOMORROW (***1/2) is on it again

First saw it in the late '80's late a night, now it seems to be catching on a bit thesedays

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Other day on here I rewatched CAPTAIN BLOOD (***1/2) still like Flynn's ROBIN HOOD & THE SEA HAWK over it though

 

They keep rotating from the network

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16 hours ago, YourManGodfrey said:

I didn't and never heard of him until this film. 😂 The next thing I know, you'll be telling me George Sanders and Tom Conway were brothers! 

On Seinfeld my favorite episode was the one with TIERNEY & for anyone that's seen RESERVOIR DIGS (l992) they may recall how Tim Roth's character escribed him THE THING from the comic book

Reason he was never in another Seinfeld according to Jerry is LAWRENCE was constantly stealing things

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I’m trying to watch TUNES OF GLORY, there is this weird thin shadowy VERTICAL LINE that is on the right side of the screen. Anyone else notice this? Is it a problem with the movie or just a glitch in my TV?

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I couldn't say LORNA, I'm still trying to fathom why TCM is showing THE WIZARD OF OZ for two nights in a row!

Can't remember the last time they did this with any movie.  :unsure:

Sepiatone

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17 minutes ago, Sepiatone said:

I couldn't say LORNA, I'm still trying to fathom why TCM is showing THE WIZARD OF OZ for two nights in a row!

Can't remember the last time they did this with any movie.  :unsure:

Sepiatone

for real?

That is WEIRD.

With EVERYTHING ELSE IN THE WORLD getting crunched financially, we might be looking at more rapid fire encores in the scheduling in the future.

at least it was something good and not GIGI.

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Crazy Mama (1975)

Cloris Leachman, Linda Purl, and Stuart Whitman in Crazy Mama (1975)

One of those dumb flicks that have enough of interest to keep you watching.  A Road movie.  For me  it had great tunes, great tail fin cars tearing up the countryside, and some classic Mojave desert landscapes with some nice locations  including  Fremont Street in Vegas, the Wigwam Motel, and other similar roadside  icons of Americana kitsch. 6/10

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