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2 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Since the last update, I've watched:

  • Leatherface: Texas Chainsaw Massacre III  (1990) - 5/10 (with Viggo Mortensen!)
  • Freddy's Dead: The Final Nightmare  (1991) - 3/10 (Alice Cooper and Rosanne Barr!)
  • Jason Goes to Hell: The Final Friday  (1993) - 4/10 (Leslie Jordan!)
  • Wes Craven's New Nightmare  (1994)  - 4/10 (John Saxon as John Saxon!)
  • Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers (1995) - 4/10 (introducing Paul Rudd!)
  • Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation  (1995) - 3/10 (Renee Zellweger and Matthew McConaughey!)
  • Halloween H20: 20 Years Later  (1998)  - 4/10 (Michelle Williams, Josh Hartnett and Joseph Gordon-Levitt!)

 

Saw 4 of those to date & now ZELLWEGER has not one but two Academy Awards

You must really be a horror fan, huh

What do you think of the 1st l978 HALLOWEEEN?

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On 4/13/2020 at 12:12 PM, Mr. Gorman said:

I've only seen FRIDAY THE 13th, Part 2  one time.  I didn't like Alice Hardy getting killed after all she went through in the first movie.  So I never watched it again and never endeavoured to find an old tape to buy. 

I don't have any of the NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET movies in my video stash.  Just never got around to it.  I've got plenty of other horror movies to watch so the 'Elm Street' movies were never a priority to obtain. 

HALLOWEEN III has one plot hole in it that drives me nuts.  Otherwise, I'd like it more.  It's certainly sinister enough. 

And so it goes . . .

Betsy ...  forget her last name right now, think she went by now though & was also in MISTER ROBERTS as you know [portrayed Jason's mother, used to live in the Tampa Bay, FL area & used to call local talk radio down here

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2 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Was it any good? The story was previously adapted as Die, Monster, Die! (1965) with Boris Karloff (5/10). There's also a recent adaptation (2019) with Nicolas Cage that surprisingly received good reviews, although I haven't seen it yet. I read the story decades ago while on a Lovecraft kick.

It was quite watchable, they did build the tension nicely and made it foreboding . 6-7/10,  It was all in Black & White and pretty creepy with only the creature in color

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Watched SINGIN' IN THE RAIN on cable demand tcm section again today for the umpteenth time  & did anyone watch 1972's WHATS UP DOC? last night?

Obviously take off on Hawks' all time definitive screwball comedy from '38 BRINGING UP BABY

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Here are some more that I've (re)watched:

  • Jason X  (2001) - 6/10
  • Halloween: Resurrection  (2002) - 4/10
  • Freddy vs. Jason  (2003) - 6/10

After these, the series all become remakes, reboots and prequels.

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

Here are some more that I've (re)watched:

  • Jason X  (2001) - 6/10
  • Halloween: Resurrection  (2002) - 4/10
  • Freddy vs. Jason  (2003) - 6/10

After these, the series all become remakes, reboots and prequels.

That's because New Line--which already had Freddy--bought the property rights to the up-for-grabs Jason and Michael Myers, and later Leatherface, off of Dimension when Michael Bay started doing those tricked-up 00's remakes.  They thought they had a house franchise, and hoped to become the Universal Horror of 80's Slashers, but just ended up killing most of them off for good with campy matchups and clueless remakes.

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3 hours ago, EricJ said:

That's because New Line--which already had Freddy--bought the property rights to the up-for-grabs Jason and Michael Myers, and later Leatherface, off of Dimension when Michael Bay started doing those tricked-up 00's remakes.  They thought they had a house franchise, and hoped to become the Universal Horror of 80's Slashers, but just ended up killing most of them off for good with campy matchups and clueless remakes.

Your details are a bit off, but the sentiment is in the right place.

Texas Chainsaw had been under the New Line banner since 1990's part 3. The latest two, in 2012 and 2017, were Millennium/Lionsgate releases.

Halloween, which was controlled by independent producer Moustapha Akkad through part 5, was later controlled (with Akkad and his son still in the mix) by Miramax/Dimension for part 6, H20, and Resurrection, and then The Weinstein Company for the 2 Rob Zombie-directed ones. They still maintained partial control over the 2018 reboot/sequel, along with Blumhouse, and with Universal distributing. New Line never made a Halloween/Michael Myers film.

Friday the 13th the title was maintained by Paramount, while they allowed original producer/director Sean S. Cunningham to take control of the Jason character, who went off and made Jason Goes to Hell, Jason X and Freddy vs Jason with New Line (notice those three don't have the "Friday the 13th" title). The 2019 Friday reboot has New Line, Warner Bros, and Paramount all involved, as well as Cunningham, and Michael Bay's Platinum Dunes company. Cunningham sold all or most of his rights to the character to New Line/Warner bros, who then sold them back to Paramount contingent on a new film being made. As none was produced by 2018, rights have now reverted back to New Line/Warner Bros. There's been a lot of legal battles over the rights, which is one reason it's been 11 years since a Friday/Jason movie has been released. Now LeBron James of all people is trying to produce a new sequel.

New Line always controlled the Nightmare/Freddy movies, which is how it garnered the nickname of the House that Freddy Built. Bay's Platinum Dunes co-produced the ill-advised 2010 attempted reboot.

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Two O'Clock Courage (1945)

I hadn't the chance to watch any films recently, so I chose something short just to say that I watched something and It turned out to be the worst film I had seen in a while. The Wikipedia page says this is a noir, but it's just a basic murder mystery. There are approximately 50 characters and 200 plot lines introduced in just over an hour, which does not make the film very easy to follow. The only good aspects are Tom Conway (an underrated actor, in my opinion) and how there is absolutely no characterization; the film dives right into the action. If you find that you have an uncontrollable desire to watch a Tom Conway film from 1945, I recommend The Falcon in San Francisco instead. 

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1314198016086_2DonovansBrain_2x1_640_320

Donovan's Brain  (1953) Dir: Felix Feist - Based on a story by Curt Siodmak, Lew Ayres stars as an obsessive scientist determined to keep a disembodied brain alive. When a man dies nearby, Ayres puts his brain in a fish tank and manages to not only keep it alive but to make it grow. Unfortunately, the brain belonged to a real jerk named Donovan, and the brain soon starts mentally possessing Ayres into continuing his nefarious ways. With Nancy Davis (Reagan) as Ayres' concerned wife, Gene Evans as an alcoholic fellow scientist, and Steve Brodie as a shady reporter.

This is perhaps the ultimate 50's sci-fi "brain" movie, with all of the tropes of the sub-genre. The brain wiggles around a bit in its aquarium housing, and a nearby oscilloscope fluctuates when the brain exerts its powers. Ayres doesn't sufficiently differentiate between his normal doctor character and the Donovan-possessed crook, since the doc was a bit of a jerk to begin with. Still, it's a fun slice of 50's kitsch, and future FLOTUS Nancy gets to handle a lab monkey.   (7/10)

Source: KL Studio Classics DVD

tumblr_nw26d3kbvr1s3mivlo1_400.jpg

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On 4/14/2020 at 3:46 PM, LawrenceA said:

The story was previously adapted as Die, Monster, Die! (1965) with Boris Karloff (5/10). There's also a recent adaptation (2019) with Nicolas Cage that surprisingly received good reviews, although I haven't seen it yet. I read the story decades ago while on a Lovecraft kick.

The '19 version is being promoted as "The return of Richard Stanley!" - The breakout new-age flavor-of-the-week director who was discovered on Hardware (1990), but whose feature career infamously dropped off the map after the long shenanigans trying to get the 1996 Marlon Brando Island of Dr. Moreau completed.

There's a very good '14 documentary, Lost Souls, on the doomed making of Stanley's version of "Moreau", and...wow.  The guy was a little....OUT THERE, even by Nic Cage standards.  😳

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Watched Gorky Park today. It got a bit too violent for me at times, but talk about an overlooked 80s film. It's a very solid thriller and all four main players are on top form: William Hurt, Lee Marvin, Brian Dennehy, and Joanna Pacula. The film is also blessed with a literate script. The music can be a bit much at times though.

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On 4/12/2020 at 9:23 PM, LawrenceA said:

I've been watching the "making of" featurettes and documentaries on each disc (some of which are longer than the actual films!), and it was interesting seeing how much of Friday the 13th Part VII was edited out. By that point in the decade, the MPAA was starting to really crack down on what they considered immoral and overly offensive horror films, so they started slapping them with X ratings (NC-17 was still a couple of years away). Nearly every kill in Part VII had some elaborate special effects work, most of which ended up being cut out to avoid the X rating. Of course, by the mid 00's, films like Hostel and the Saw series and their imitators would be much more graphic, and without the winking, tongue-in-cheek quality of many of the franchise slasher flicks.

Even non-slasher films had issues with the MPAA in the 80s. I'm reminded of the James Bond film Licence to Kill (which remains the most brutal film in that series). All the Bonds up until this one were PGs, and then you had this one with an exploding head, a character on fire, one getting ground up, shark bites, tortue, heart being ripped out of a person offscreen, and the film was slapped with an R. They edited a bit to get a PG-13, but interestingly, they sent the R-cut to the MPAA about 17 years after the fact and it got a PG-13 no questions asked.

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0c59a4e9ce2bec04cf7f92890082f654.jpg

This Island Earth  (1955) Dir: Joseph Newman - Technicolor 50's sci-fi with square-jawed hero Rex Reason and fellow scientist Faith Domergue working with aliens led by Jeff Morrow. Are they out to conquer the Earth, or is something else at play? With Russell "The Professor" Johnson, Lance Fuller, and Douglas Spencer.

Very colorful, and with lots of iconic 50's sci-fi imagery, this is entertaining and very corny at the same time. Reason has one of the all-time great "hero" voices, while the aliens' look, with high foreheads and snow-white hair, is both silly and memorable. The "Metaluna Mutants" are among the greatest sci-fi monster designs.  I like the production design as well, and the costumes are amusing, especially the aliens' clear plastic helmets.   (7/10)

Source: Scream Factory Blu-ray, with excellent picture quality, and a restored stereo soundtrack. There's also some audio and video interviews with various filmmakers and critics, as well as a lengthy making-of documentary. 

this-island-earth-crop-1.jpg

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47 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

0c59a4e9ce2bec04cf7f92890082f654.jpg

This Island Earth  (1955) Dir: Joseph Newman - Technicolor 50's sci-fi with square-jawed hero Rex Reason and fellow scientist Faith Domergue working with aliens led by Jeff Morrow. Are they out to conquer the Earth, or is something else at play? With Russell "The Professor" Johnson, Lance Fuller, and Douglas Spencer.

 

 

And I would like to make special reference to Faith Domergue's torpedo bra in this film, on full display in this photo. Let's face it, folks, without the missile sized bras that many actresses wore at the time, '50s films would be a lot less interesting today.

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21 hours ago, EricJ said:

That's because New Line--which already had Freddy--bought the property rights to the up-for-grabs Jason and Michael Myers, and later Leatherface, off of Dimension when Michael Bay started doing those tricked-up 00's remakes.  They thought they had a house franchise, and hoped to become the Universal Horror of 80's Slashers, but just ended up killing most of them off for good with campy matchups and clueless remakes.

You folks really like CLIFTON WEBB, huh  Did you see item I wrote yesterday about his famous or infamous grave?

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InvasionBodySnatchers2.jpg

Invasion of the Body Snatchers  (1956) Dir: Don Siegel - Cold War paranoia in sci-fi dressing, with small-town doc Kevin McCarthy stumbling upon a sinister plot to replace his fellow citizens with emotionless "pod people". With Dana Wynter, Larry Gates, Carolyn Jones, King Donovan, Virginia Christine, Dabbs Greer, Whit Bissell, Richard Deacon, and Sam Peckinpah as Charlie the gas man. 

This still holds up as an excellent suspense thriller, and set the template for dozens of "replacement horror" movies and TV shows that followed it. Siegel's taut, economical direction, coupled with the stark B&W cinematography by Ellsworth Fredericks, adds both an accelerating urgency and a semi-documentarian realism. One of the best science fiction films ever made.  (9/10)

Source: Olive Signature Blu-ray, featuring multiple commentary tracks, along with a half-dozen or more featurettes on the film's production and lasting impact. There's also a featurette spotlighting producer Walter Wanger. 

invasion-of-the-body-snatchers-the-towns

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4 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

 Reason has one of the all-time great "hero" voices, \

Yeah. what is the story with his voice? I noticed that with John Gavin as well. Always sounds like somebody amplified their voices, or added some vibrato.

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7 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

1314198016086_2DonovansBrain_2x1_640_320

Donovan's Brain  (1953) Dir: Felix Feist - Based on a story by Curt Siodmak, Lew Ayres stars as an obsessive scientist determined to keep a disembodied brain alive. When a man dies nearby, Ayres puts his brain in a fish tank and manages to not only keep it alive but to make it grow. Unfortunately, the brain belonged to a real jerk named Donovan, and the brain soon starts mentally possessing Ayres into continuing his nefarious ways. With Nancy Davis (Reagan) as Ayres' concerned wife, Gene Evans as an alcoholic fellow scientist, and Steve Brodie as a shady reporter.

This is perhaps the ultimate 50's sci-fi "brain" movie, with all of the tropes of the sub-genre. The brain wiggles around a bit in its aquarium housing, and a nearby oscilloscope fluctuates when the brain exerts its powers. Ayres doesn't sufficiently differentiate between his normal doctor character and the Donovan-possessed crook, since the doc was a bit of a jerk to begin with. Still, it's a fun slice of 50's kitsch, and future FLOTUS Nancy gets to handle a lab monkey.   (7/10)

 

My favorite scene in this film is when Ayres checks  into a hotel with unbelievable room service:
 “Send up a thick steak, porterhouse, rare, charred, esparagus, hollandaise, celery hearts, crisp, olives, large ones …”
The food arrives in 72 seconds (yes, I timed it).

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1 minute ago, scsu1975 said:

My favorite scene in this film is when Ayres checks  into a hotel with unbelievable room service:
 “Send up a thick steak, porterhouse, rare, charred, esparagus, hollandaise, celery hearts, crisp, olives, large ones …”
The food arrives in 72 seconds (yes, I timed it).

Yeah, I enjoyed that scene. I thought, "This guy really knows what he wants", the way he rattled off that order. And the fact that the hotel had it all at hand, and ready to make and send up so quickly...room service was just that much better in the 50's.

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1 minute ago, LawrenceA said:

Yeah, I enjoyed that scene. I thought, "This guy really knows what he wants", the way he rattled off that order. And the fact that the hotel had it all at hand, and ready to make and send up so quickly...room service was just that much better in the 50's.

He also got cigars  in 90 seconds but in fairness the hotel had to send out for them.

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My most recent viewings:

Clouds Over Europe (1939) 8/10
The Panther's Claw (1942) 8/10

The Fake (1953) 7/10
Shadow of Suspicion (1944) 7/10
Shadows on the Stairs (1941) 7/10
The Fiction Makers (1968) 7/10

Bulldog Drummond's Bride (1939) 8/10
Bulldog Drummond's Secret Police (1939) 8/10
Bulldog Drummond Escapes (1937) 7/10
Arrest Bulldog Drummond (1938) 7/10

Flight to Nowhere (1946) 6/10
Time Table (1956) 6/10


Movies of which I watched the first twenty minutes or less:

The Cat Burglar (1961)
The Eleventh Commandment (1933)
Murder by the Book (1987)
Account Rendered (1957)

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You should've watched THE TWELTH COMMANDMENT, SansFin.  It's a better movie! 

(Just kidding; I don't know if there ~is~ a movie with that title . . . ).  :P 

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