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7 minutes ago, Mr. Gorman said:

You should've watched THE TWELTH COMMANDMENT, SansFin.  It's a better movie! 

(Just kidding; I don't know if there ~is~ a movie with that title . . . ).  :P 

It is a very old literary device to state that the eleventh commandment is: "Thou Shalt Not Get Caught."

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8 hours ago, scsu1975 said:

My favorite scene in this film is when Ayres checks  into a hotel with unbelievable room service:
 “Send up a thick steak, porterhouse, rare, charred, esparagus, hollandaise, celery hearts, crisp, olives, large ones …”
The food arrives in 72 seconds (yes, I timed it).

Good thing he didn't order that porterhouse well done. He might have had to wait 73 seconds.

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On 4/14/2020 at 10:05 PM, EricJ said:

That's because New Line--which already had Freddy--bought the property rights to the up-for-grabs Jason and Michael Myers, and later Leatherface, off of Dimension when Michael Bay started doing those tricked-up 00's remakes.  They thought they had a house franchise, and hoped to become the Universal Horror of 80's Slashers, but just ended up killing most of them off for good with campy matchups and clueless remakes.

PART 5 will, I hope, always be THE WORST ENTRY IN THE SERIES, but JASON GOES TO HELL really deserves a special mention for how genuinely terrible it is. In fact, now that I think about it, PART V could fairly be considered not even a legit entry in the series which would make GOES TO HELL the WORST. 

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10 hours ago, scsu1975 said:

My favorite scene in this film is when Ayres checks  into a hotel with unbelievable room service:
 “Send up a thick steak, porterhouse, rare, charred, esparagus, hollandaise, celery hearts, crisp, olives, large ones …”
The food arrives in 72 seconds (yes, I timed it).

I read this thread "backwards" (from the bottom up or most to least recent post) and the minute someone mentioned RIDICULOUSLY FAST ROOM SERVICE, I knew you were talking about DONOVAN'S BRAIN.

It really deserves to be better known than it is, it is a uniquely terrible film.

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15 hours ago, CinemaInternational said:
  On 4/12/2020 at 9:23 PM, LawrenceA said:

I've been watching the "making of" featurettes and documentaries on each disc (some of which are longer than the actual films!), and it was interesting seeing how much of Friday the 13th Part VII was edited out. By that point in the decade, the MPAA was starting to really crack down on what they considered immoral and overly offensive horror films, so they started slapping them with X ratings (NC-17 was still a couple of years away). Nearly every kill in Part VII had some elaborate special effects work, most of which ended up being cut out to avoid the X rating. Of course, by the mid 00's,

the cut scenes are on youtube. the one of the Mom is too much, but the rest of them are pretty great and porbbaly the best done of the series (YOU CAN TELL they spent a CRAZY amount of time shooting and editing them.)

PART VII has HANDS DOWN my favorite kill in the whole series, the MEAN GIRL (with PEARLS!) GETS THE AXE TO THE HEAD. would post a video but...you know...

PS- TINA'S MOM looks like SONIC THE HEDGEHOG

MV5BZDExMGM0Y2YtMGNiZi00Mjc5LWI2NTItOWY1

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if anyone is interested in a MUCH MUCH MUCH BETTER version of DONOVAN'S BRAIN, here is ORSON WELLES on the radio, sorry they misspell his name...but it's the full broadcast and a decent recording:

"sure sure sure"

 

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

PART VII has HANDS DOWN my favorite kill in the whole series, the MEAN GIRL (with PEARLS!) GETS THE AXE TO THE HEAD. would post a video but...you know...

It's not just the axe in the head, but the way Jason then tosses her over the TV into the corner of the room like a sack of garbage, that makes her death all the more impressive.

Many of the edited bits were included as a bonus feature. The one that stuck out to me was when Jason uses his bare hands to crush a guy's head, and it goes to ludicrous extremes. 

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39 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

It's not just the axe in the head, but the way Jason then tosses her over the TV into the corner of the room like a sack of garbage, that makes her death all the more impressive.

it's a beautiful moment, and it's one of the briefest least gory kills of the series. even the unedited version is only, like, a nanosecond longer.

the actress has since passed away and was spoken of well by the director.

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Willard Poster

Willard (1971) Cinemax On Demand 7/10

A lonely man trains an army of rats to do his bidding.

Another rewatch for me. I have always liked this one, mostly for the excellent performance of Bruce Davison in the lead. It was one of those "animals run amok" films of the 1970s, which included Frogs, Night Of The Lepus, Stanley.  I liked the supporting cast of Sondra Locke as a temp worker who takes a liking to Willard, Elsa Lanchester as his nagging mother and Ernest Borgnine as the boss from hell. 

This one has several creepy scenes (especially if you are creeped out by rats), but no gore. Though I do recall years ago seeing closeups of the rats eating some bloody meat, which was supposed to be human flesh. These scenes were cut from this version that I just saw. 

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caltiki-1.jpg

Caltiki - the Immortal Monster  (1959) Dir: Riccardo Freda - Italian sci-fi/horror about an alien blob that's lain dormant in Mayan ruins for hundreds of years, and then is awakening to wreck havoc on modern Mexico. With John Merivale, Didi Perego, Gerard Herter, Daniela Rocca, and Giacomo Rossi-Stuart.

I like this short (76 minutes), derivative international horror tale, mainly due to the second unit/special effects work (supervised by an uncredited Mario Bava), and the tawdry subplots that come across like bad soap opera storylines but are shot with film noir panache. The unusual looking blob creatures are effective, and the damage inflicted by their acidic touch is shockingly graphic for the time.   (7/10)

Source: Arrow Blu-ray, with both the English and Italian soundtracks, as well as a handful of featurettes on the film's production.

Caltiki-5-615x384.jpg

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MV5BZjkyNDk2ZTQtNDFkMy00NDYyLWFlYjUtZmFh

Black Sunday  (1960) Dir: Mario Bava - Gothic horror with Barbara Steele as a woman executed for "consorting with Satan" in ancient Moldavia. Two centuries later, she is freed from her tomb, returning to life as a vampire bent on revenge against the descendants of those who tormented her. With John Richardson, Andrea Checchi, Ivo Garrani, and Arturo Dominici.

After the success of Riccardo Freda's 1957 I Vampiri, and the Hammer films from the UK, there was a boom in Gothic horror made in Europe. Black Sunday is generally regarded as the pinnacle of this sub-genre, and while that's debatable, it is certainly a beautifully filmed, highly atmospheric classic. Much of the film's impact comes via star Barbara Steele, with her unusual beauty, accentuated by large eyes that perfectly fit the melodramatic material. The opening scene, involving hammering a spiked mask onto the accused witch's face, made a huge impression on me when I first saw this.   (8/10)

Source: Kino Blu-ray

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Ben Poster

Ben (1972) Cinemax On Demand 3/10

A boy with a heart condition makes friends with Ben, the leader of the late Willard's army of rats.

This sequel to Willard begins with the final scene of that film, where Willard is killed by his former friends. Ben is often laughably bad, without the suspense or pathos of the original. Lee H. Montgomery plays the boy and strives for poignancy but the kid is really annoying. He sings the Oscar nominated title song, but he can't sing at all! Luckily we get to hear Michael Jackson's much better hit version at the end. There is a good cast but they are mostly wasted- Joseph Campanella is a cop, Arthur O'Connell is a reporter, Rosemary Murphy is the boy's mother and Meredith Baxter is his sister. There are some hilarious (unintentional?) scenes where a trucker is turned into a babbling fool at the sight of the rats and another one where the vermin attack a health spa filled with women in leotards and towels. 

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2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Lee H. Montgomery plays the boy and strives for poignancy but the kid is really annoying. He sings the Oscar nominated title song, but he can't sing at all!

Yeah, I was laughing hysterically when he started singing the lyrics Rex Harrison Sprechgesang style. :lol:

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4 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

Willard (1971) Cinemax On Demand 7/10

Another rewatch for me. I have always liked this one, mostly for the excellent performance of Bruce Davison in the lead.

Bruce Davison, of course, would grow up to become more famous as nasty Senator Kelly of the X-Men films.

There's a BTS making-of scene for the first X-Men, where Davison and Rebecca Roumjin-Stamos in makeup are waiting around the set in cold water at night on the set, joking about the poor conditions, and Davison jokes "I've already had rats, I'm used to this..."

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The-City-of-the-Dead-1960-horror-hotel-m

The City of the Dead (1960) Dir: John Llewellyn Moxey - British supernatural horror with various people traveling to a small New England village harboring a dark secret involving curses and witchcraft. With Christopher Lee as a professor of paranormal studies, Venetia Stevenson, Betta St. John, Valentine Dyall, Tom Naylor, Dennis Lotis, and Patricia Jessel.

Released in the US under the sillier Horror Hotel title, this is a very good horror film, with exceptional atmosphere and many memorable images - the dancing "guests" in the hotel that suddenly vanish, the unearthly townsfolk standing motionless in fog-enshrouded streets, a man appearing at a misty crossroads, etc.   (8/10)

Source: VCI Blu-ray, which includes both the British and American versions, as well as interviews with Christopher Lee, Venetia Stevenson, and director John Llewellyn Moxey.

 

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16 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

The-City-of-the-Dead-1960-horror-hotel-m

The City of the Dead (1960) Dir: John Llewellyn Moxey - British supernatural horror with various people traveling to a small New England village harboring a dark secret involving curses and witchcraft. With Christopher Lee as a professor of paranormal studies, Venetia Stevenson, Betta St. John, Valentine Dyall, Tom Naylor, Dennis Lotis, and Patricia Jessel.

Released in the US under the sillier Horror Hotel title, this is a very good horror film, with exceptional atmosphere and many memorable images - the dancing "guests" in the hotel that suddenly vanish, the unearthly townsfolk standing motionless in fog-enshrouded streets, a man appearing at a misty crossroads, etc.   (8/10)

Source: VCI Blu-ray, which includes both the British and American versions, as well as interviews with Christopher Lee, Venetia Stevenson, and director John Llewellyn Moxey.

This is one of my favorite horror films. (I saw it when it came out, at the Valentine Theater in the Bronx, on a double bill with The Head.) I liked it so much that, on one of my first trips to London in the 1970s, I went to see a play because Valentine Dyall was in it (also because Joe Orton wrote the play in question). Dyall plays Jethrow Keane in The City of the Dead.  He has one of the great lines, which I've used over the years. When the young woman says she hasn't seen him around, he replies, "To see me is a special privilege, reserved for a chosen few." Patricia Jessel is brilliant in her role as Elizabeth Selwyn/Mrs. Newless.

Years ago, I met a guy at a dinner party in London who was in the film. His name was (I think he died) Terry Sartain.  He's credited (or rather uncredited) on IMDB as "Guard Holding Selwyn." He told me that Francis L. Sullivan was his godfather.

patricia-jessel.jpg

Valentine Dyall and Patricia Jessel

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Swithin, I would take the #4 Bus to Fordham Rd. to get to the Valentine Theater. Among the many films I saw there was The World of Henry Orient when it was first released. Didn't mean to interrupt the thread but it's such a good memory for me. RKO Fordham and the Lowe's Paradise and the Valentine Theater all within walking distance. Bronxgirl has these memories too I'm sure. OK guys, you may continue now :)

 

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15 hours ago, Fedya said:

Yeah, I was laughing hysterically when he started singing the lyrics Rex Harrison Sprechgesang style. :lol:

Yes, he did the "talk singing" at first but then suddenly switched to an annoying high pitched falsetto.

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15 hours ago, EricJ said:

Bruce Davison, of course, would grow up to become more famous as nasty Senator Kelly of the X-Men films.

There's a BTS making-of scene for the first X-Men, where Davison and Rebecca Roumjin-Stamos in makeup are waiting around the set in cold water at night on the set, joking about the poor conditions, and Davison jokes "I've already had rats, I'm used to this..."

He was a very underrated actor. He also played the child molester in the movie version of the Miguel Pinero play Short Eyes. He finally got an Oscar nomination in 1990 for Longtime Companion.

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40 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

He was a very underrated actor. He also played the child molester in the movie version of the Miguel Pinero play Short Eyes. He finally got an Oscar nomination in 1990 for Longtime Companion.

And he's one of those actors who is so genuinely good that they shine even in lesser material. He was on a season 3(?) episode of MURDER, SHE WROTE about a small town sheriff who is out of control and he was excellent.

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11 hours ago, Swithin said:

This is one of my favorite horror films. Patricia Jessel is brilliant in her role as Elizabeth Selwyn/Mrs. Newless.

 

patricia-jessel.jpg

Valentine Dyall and Patricia Jessel

SHE HAS a lot of presence, I bet she was great on stage.

I've seen the RIFFTRAX version of HORROR hOTEL/CITY OF THE DEAD many times.  They have a lot of fun with the EASTERN EUROPEAN and BRITISH actors struggling to seem AMERICAN (why they didn't go ahead and just set it in ENGLAND is a mystery, maybe it was to appeal to CHRISTOPHER LEE'S EGO and let him try out an accent?)

MILTON SUBOTSKY reworked this as THE GHOULS/LOUGHVILLE segment of the movie THE MONSTER CLUB (1980)- and I REALLY LIKE THAT VERSION AN AWFUL LOT, it's on youtube.

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10 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I've seen the RIFFTRAX version of HORROR hOTEL/CITY OF THE DEAD many times. 

Have to seek that out. I didn't care too much for the movie as released. Still watchable, it was only a case of "your enjoyment diminishes once you see the plot hole" for me.

Also the case for Mario Bava movies.... I'll never forget a scene with a strong wind blowing tons of maggots through a large window into charactor's faces while they stand there like dummies. Um, problem resolved by closing the window or just leaving the room.

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24 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 They have a lot of fun with the EASTERN EUROPEAN and BRITISH actors struggling to seem AMERICAN (why they didn't go ahead and just set it in ENGLAND is a mystery, maybe it was to appeal to CHRISTOPHER LEE'S EGO and let him try out an accent?)

The witches in City of the Dead/Horror Hotel are hundreds of years old; for example, the film opens in colonial Massachusetts (1692). People at that time sounded much more British than the American that we are used to, so it's appropriate for them to sound British.  It would be odd if they sounded contemporary American.  I'm not aware of any Eastern European actors in the cast.

Witchcraft in early America holds a special place in the history of witchcraft, so I think it makes sense for the film to be set in Massachusetts. There was a culture of witchcraft in various parts of the UK -- many scholars have written about it -- but it was seen to a greater extent as a continuation of the pre-Christian "pagan" traditions, although Satan worship  was sometimes involved. (See works by Margaret Murray and others.) Also, the harsher Puritan traditions in early America created a different milieu. The fire-and-brimstone preacher Cotton Mather flourished in Massachusetts during the time that Elizabeth Selwyn was burned at the stake.

horror.jpg

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4 minutes ago, Swithin said:

The witches in City of the Dead/Horror Hotel are hundreds of years old; for example, the film opens in colonial Massachusetts (1692). People at that time sounded much more British than the American that we are used to, so it's appropriate for them to sound British.  It would be odd if they sounded contemporary American.  I'm not aware of any Eastern European actors in the cast.

 

horror.jpg

THAT'S a fair point, although LEE'S character is living in the present and the brother of the girl who goes missing (in the present) is clearly British (he sounds like CARY GRANT) HIS SISTER (who goes missing) is obviously Swedish or from one of the "finger countries" as is her boyfriend who sounds like DOLPH LUNDGREN and probably does the weakest job suppressing his accent.

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16 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Have to seek that out. I didn't care too much for the movie as released. Still watchable, it was only a case of "your enjoyment diminishes once you see the plot hole" for me.

Also the case for Mario Bava movies.... I'll never forget a scene with a strong wind blowing tons of maggots through a large window into charactor's faces while they stand there like dummies. Um, problem resolved by closing the window or just leaving the room.

it's on AMAZON PRIME for free. outside of that, you could try the rifftrax website. the "vibe" of it verymuch reminds me of the SCI-FI ERA EPISODES of MST 3K, which (over time) have come to be my favorites.

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