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Lolita  (1962) Dir: Stanley Kubrick - Nabokov adapts his own controversial novel for this black comedy about a teacher (James Mason) who falls in love with the underage daughter (Sue Lyon) of his landlord (Shelley Winters). With Peter Sellers, Lois Maxwell, and Cec Linder.

I hadn't watched this in 15 years or longer. I still enjoyed it, yet perhaps a bit less than memory recollects. Many cite Sellers and his bizarre performance as the film's weakest link, but for me he's the highlight, particularly his impersonation of director Kubrick's voice. Mason is reliably good as the man on a slow spiral to self-destruction, and Winters turns in another of her effective boorish turns. Sue Lyon got the most press at the time, and she's suitably pretty in a blank way. She has moments of subtle emoting, but whether that was from personal talent/choice or careful stewardship of the director, it's hard to tell. I had also forgotten that the movie was over 2 and a half hours long.  (8/10)

Source: Warner Blu-ray. The sole bonus feature is the original trailer. This is the only Kubrick film that has a bare-bones disc release.

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4 minutes ago, LawrenceA said:

Many cite Sellers and his bizarre performance as the film's weakest link, but for me he's the highlight, particularly his impersonation of director Kubrick's voice.

I love this one as well 8/10. I also think Sellers is one of the best things about it, his scene where he babbles on at the hotel to Mason is one of the funniest things he ever did.

Also the first scene, where Mason holds a gun on him and Sellers goes into a Texas cowboy accent, saying "That's a durlin' little gun ya got there"

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The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)

I finally got around to watching this classic and my main takeaway is: technicolor! It's hard not to smile when watching the Merry Men swing from trees. I know Errol Flynn is the star, but I enjoyed the performances by Basil Rathbone and Claude Rains the most. Captain Blood and The Master of Ballantrae are still my two favorite Flynn films. I am going to assume that most will raise an eyebrow at the inclusion of the latter. 😂

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Dr. Strangelove  (1964) Dir: Stanley Kubrick - Kubrick, Peter George, and Terry Southern turn George's serious cold-war nuclear thriller Red Alert into black comedy gold. When USAF General Jack D. Rpper (Sterling Hayden) goes mad and orders a full nuclear airstrike on the Soviet Union, various characters react to the situation. including a British RAF exchange officer (Peter Sellers), a bomber pilot (Slim Pickens) and his crew, and the US President (Peter Sellers). With George C. Scott, Keenan Wynn, Peter Bull, Tracy Reed, James Earl Jones, Shane Rimmer, and Peter Sellers as "Dr. Strangelove".

This is one of my all-time favorite comedies, and it never gets old for me, no matter how often I watch it. All of the performances are perfectly pitched, and the humor ranges from the sly and subtle to the outrageous and farcical. George C. Scott gives one of the great intentional overacting performances as the comically gung-ho General Buck Turgidson. Every time I watch this I like Sellers' 3 characterizations even more - this time I was particularly drawn to the stuffy British Captain Lionel Mandrake, struggling to cope with the raving lunacy of Hayden's General Ripper. I also love Peter Bull's turn as the Soviet ambassador, mugging to great effect. The President's one-sided phone calls with Soviet Premier Dimitri are some the funniest scenes I've ever seen.  (10/10)

Source: Criterion Blu-ray. Bonus features include several interviews with film scholars and critics, an archival audio interview with Kubrick, and archival interviews with Sellers and Scott. There are also a few making-of featurettes, and included in the disc packaging is an envelope, made to resemble those seen in the bomber scene, with essays, photos, and even a miniature combination Holy Bible and Russian phrase book.

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1 hour ago, YourManGodfrey said:

The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)

I finally got around to watching this classic and my main takeaway is: technicolor! It's hard not to smile when watching the Merry Men swing from trees. I know Errol Flynn is the star, but I enjoyed the performances by Basil Rathbone and Claude Rains the most. Captain Blood and The Master of Ballantrae are still my two favorite Flynn films. I am going to assume that most will raise an eyebrow at the inclusion of the latter. 😂

I definitely raise an eyebrow at the inclusion of The Master of Ballantrae because I thought I was one of the few who really like this later Flynn effort. It's rarely mentioned by fans, a bit unfairly, I think. Great on location photography by Jack Cardiff enhances the appeal of this film but director William Keighley keeps the film moving at a fast pace. A later Errol, while no longer the light heated charmer that he had been in his prime years, is still a force to be reckoned with with a sword in his hand. The flair was still there even if he was older and a bit grimmer. Roger Livesey is great in support.

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4 hours ago, YourManGodfrey said:

The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938)

I finally got around to watching this classic and my main takeaway is: technicolor! It's hard not to smile when watching the Merry Men swing from trees. I know Errol Flynn is the star, but I enjoyed the performances by Basil Rathbone and Claude Rains the most. Captain Blood and The Master of Ballantrae are still my two favorite Flynn films. I am going to assume that most will raise an eyebrow at the inclusion of the latter. 😂

I like The Master of Ballantrae as well, though I haven't seen it in a long time.

If you haven't seen this Flynn film, I highly recommend Gentleman Jim.  While I love Flynn in 'Robin Hood,' this is my favorite Flynn performance.

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2001: A Space Odyssey  (1968) Dir: Stanley Kubrick - Humanity, from hominid to star-child, in four acts. With Keir Dullea, Gary Lockwood, William Sylvester, and the voice of Douglas Rain. 

I don't feel the need to go on at length about this movie, as it's been discussed ad nauseam over the past 50+ years. I'll just say that I loved it as much as ever, if not more so, and consider it in the top tier of the motion picture art form.  (10/10)

Source: Warner Blu-ray. This was the recent restoration release, and the picture looks better than ever. There's also a separate disc of bonus features, including various featurettes on the film's making and impact.

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4 hours ago, TomJH said:

I definitely raise an eyebrow at the inclusion of The Master of Ballantrae because I thought I was one of the few who really like this later Flynn effort. It's rarely mentioned by fans, a bit unfairly, I think.

I caught it during a Flynn tribute last year and picked it over some of his more popular films, because it won't be shown as often. When TCM does tributes, I usually pick the more rare films over the popular films. I will often prefer the lesser known films to the more popular counterparts.

 

1 hour ago, speedracer5 said:

I like The Master of Ballantrae as well, though I haven't seen it in a long time.

If you haven't seen this Flynn film, I highly recommend Gentleman Jim.  While I love Flynn in 'Robin Hood,' this is my favorite Flynn performance.

I will be very honest; I was waiting for you to comment! 😂 I know he's one of your favorites, but sometimes I find Flynn's acting to be very wooden, but I really enjoyed it in The Master of Ballantrae. I counted his films and I have only seen 8 of them (and exactly half of The Sea Hawk, which I was really enjoying before it was taken off of onDemand). I do like a good boxing movie, so I'll seek out Gentleman Jim. Uncertain Glory is the one Flynn film that I REALLY want to see. I caught the first 15 minutes and was hooked. 

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5 minutes ago, YourManGodfrey said:

I caught it during a Flynn tribute last year and picked it over some of his more popular films, because it won't be shown as often. When TCM does tributes, I usually pick the more rare films over the popular films. I will often prefer the lesser known films to the more popular counterparts.

 

I will be very honest; I was waiting for you to comment! 😂 I know he's one of your favorites, but sometimes I find Flynn's acting to be very wooden, but I really enjoyed it in The Master of Ballantrae. I counted his films and I have only seen 8 of them (and exactly half of The Sea Hawk, which I was really enjoying before it was taken off of onDemand). I do like a good boxing movie, so I'll seek out Gentleman Jim. Uncertain Glory is the one Flynn film that I REALLY want to see. I caught the first 15 minutes and was hooked. 

I love Uncertain Glory. It’s one of Flynn’s few roles where he’s not really a good person, but you still root for him anyway, because the man is so darn likeable! And even though I despise smoking, Flynn looks really hot smoking in this movie. Lol. 

If you can find it, I also recommend Mara Maru. It’s a latter Flynn film but I find it very interesting. 

The only two Flynn films that I’ve seen that I was really meh about were Another Dawn and Kim. With Another Dawn, I don’t know if they used too much soft focus lenses or what it was, but Flynn looked like a porcelain doll in this film and I found it very unappealing. 

You should also see The Sisters if you haven’t yet. Flynn is paired with Bette Davis and he’s excellent in his dramatic role. 

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Did anyone else here watch the film Network which just aired on TCM tonight??  

I got chills watching it!  How interesting that a film made over 40 years ago could be so damn PROPHETIC, RELEVANT to 21st Century America--an era dominated by global corporate monopolies that have risen to wield vast power over our political system, media, and almost every aspect of our daily lives!!

 

 

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Just now, kate333 said:

Did anyone else here watch the film Network which just aired on TCM tonight??  

I got chills watching it!  How interesting that a film made over 40 years ago could be so damn PROPHETIC, RELEVANT to 21st Century America--an era dominated by global corporate monopolies that have risen to wield vast power over our political system, media, and almost every aspect of our daily lives!!

I love “Network.” I’ve always thought that this film would make a great double feature with “A Face in the Crowd,” a film that is very prescient today. 

I own both films, I should make this double feature happen. Maybe tomorrow. It’s not like I have anything else to do. 

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44 minutes ago, speedracer5 said:

The only two Flynn films that I’ve seen that I was really meh about were Another Dawn and Kim.

I watched Kim not too long ago and thought it was awful. I am not really into child actors and Flynn was barely in the film. 

I have seen:

Captain Blood

The Adventures of Robin Hood 

Dodge City

The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex

Northern Pursuit 

Objective, Burma!

Kim

The Master of Ballantrae 

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28 minutes ago, YourManGodfrey said:

I watched Kim not too long ago and thought it was awful. I am not really into child actors and Flynn was barely in the film. 

I have seen:

Captain Blood

The Adventures of Robin Hood 

Dodge City

The Private Lives of Elizabeth and Essex

Northern Pursuit 

Objective, Burma!

Kim

The Master of Ballantrae 

You should also see some of Flynn's comedic films.  They're not the greatest films by any means, but they're amusing.  I especially enjoy Footsteps in the Dark where Flynn shows off his detective skills.  I also enjoy Never Say Goodbye.  I am also not a fan of child actors either, but for whatever reason, the little girl in Never Say Goodbye cracks me up.  Flynn is paired with Eleanor Parker, they play ex-husband and wife.  Their daughter is tired of spending 6 months with one parent, 6 months with the other, so she schemes to get them back together. Parker and Flynn make such a gorgeous couple that I wish they were together in real life. Lol.  SZ Sakall plays a friend of Flynn's and he's hilarious.  This film has joined my annual Christmas film rotation, but I may watch the film throughout the year.

I don't like Kim either.  I thought it was really boring and Flynn's red hair looked awful.  The best thing about Kim are Dean Stockwell's anecdotes about his experience making the film with Flynn.

For sure though, you need to see Gentleman Jim.  I believe that that was Flynn's favorite of all his films and I personally think that this is his best film.
 

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15 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Lolita  (1962)  I hadn't watched this in 15 years or longer. I still enjoyed it, yet perhaps a bit less than memory recollects.

I just can't seem to enjoy this movie. The performances are great, but just can't believe a mature man would truly fall in love with a teen. Actually it's obsession, not love. 

While I can look at a teen and recognize how young, fresh & beautiful they are, their minds are still a teen's. Lolita is no different, she's just a little girl in a quickly developing body.

I just can't buy an educated,  mature man would be so incredibly stupid to allow hormones to take over all intellect. Maybe because I'm female, but it just strikes me false.

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I just can't buy an educated,  mature man would be so incredibly stupid to allow hormones to take over all intellect. Maybe because I'm female, but it just strikes me false.

I would agree, yet it happens all the time. Seemingly mature, intelligent men (and a few women) frequently destroy themselves over sexual hang-ups. 

The novel is even more disturbing, where Lolita is 12 years old.

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I watched ISLE OF THE DEAD (1945) because it seemed relevant and it was on TCM ON DEMAND.

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The first time I saw this movie was on VHS in the late eighties, I was less than 12 years old. Like all the VAL LEWTON films, I think I would have genuinely liked it more if I had not read from SO MANY DIFFERENT SOURCES (books and magazines at the time) about what a genius LEWTON was. His films are fine, certainly smarter than your average horror  fair, and there is something very special about CURSE OF THE CAT PEOPLE, but a lot of the other films he produced are kinda slow going, and this one is no exception.

it's a looong hour and ten minutes, made interesting at times by the parallels to the current crisis (the plot is that people are quarintined on a GREEK ISLAND in 1912 during a war because a plague has emerged among them, there were even hand washing and social distancing scenes!

BORIS KARLOFF IS MISCAST IN THIS. He still gives it an A Effort (when didn't he?) but his role was, I would imagine, diminished by some real life health problems that postponed production and even cost the original lead actress. (His back injuries from FRANKENSTEIN were flaring up.)

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BORIS ALSO HAS A PERM IN THIS MOVIE (in 1930's/40's HOLLYWOOD, PERM=GREEK), WHICH DOES AN AWFUL LOT TO UNDERCUT WHATEVER GRAVITY HE COULD ACHIEVE IN HIS SUPPORTING PART. He looks an awful lot like my great grandmother.

this movie has one of MY FAVORITE CLASSIC HORROR TROPES, which is that the male romantic lead is USELESS and often wears jodhpurs.

the ending to this has stuck with me since that night watching the tape in the late 80's. it's surprisingly graphic for 1945.

spoilers kinda sorta below, and i apologize if this offends anyone BUT,

JASON ROBARDS SR. has a role in this as the owner of the Island, a SWISS antiques dealer without a hint of accent. It has been a very long time since I have seen a performance this bad in a film. he is terrible. every single one of his reads is as if he were in fact a Production Assistant dryly running lines with the actors before the cameras started rolling. he wrecks every scene he is in, and even manages to **** all over Boris's big death scene. it's been a while since i have seen a whole film undercut by such a weak acting job. AND before anyone gets mad at me, I think JASON ROBARDS JR was a fantastic actor and I will also entertain the possibility that the director (MARK ROBSON) was sabotaging him or maybe he was a great stage actor who just didn't know how to translate to film, especially a horror/fantasy film. nonetheless: DAMN HE IS SO BAAAAD IN THIS MOVIE!

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A Clockwork Orange (1971) Dir: Stanley Kubrick - Hilarious family comedy about a young man (Malcolm McDowell) and his friends getting up to mischief and shenanigans. Featuring Warren Clarke, Patrick Magee, Aubrey Morris, Michael Bates, Philip Stone, Adrienne Corri, Miriam Karlin, Steven Berkoff, and David Prowse.

Kubrick's dystopian follow-up to the majestic, cerebral 2001 is a grueling, funny, disturbing, inventive romp. The protagonist's amorality in conflict with the state's invasive attempts at thought control stir up debate of freedom vs security, and the film offers no easy answers. The soundtrack, a mix of classical pieces and avant-garde electronic music, adds immensely to the atmosphere.  This film still packs a punch, and it now has the added pleasure of a lot of great 70's-future production design.  (10/10)

Source: Warner Blu-ray, with a few featurettes (two on the film's making, one profiling McDowell).

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23 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

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Lolita  (1962) Dir: Stanley Kubrick - Nabokov adapts his own controversial novel for this black comedy about a teacher (James Mason) who falls in love with the underage daughter (Sue Lyon) of his landlord (Shelley Winters). With Peter Sellers, Lois Maxwell, and Cec Linder.

I hadn't watched this in 15 years or longer. I still enjoyed it, yet perhaps a bit less than memory recollects. Many cite Sellers and his bizarre performance as the film's weakest link, but for me he's the highlight, particularly his impersonation of director Kubrick's voice. Mason is reliably good as the man on a slow spiral to self-destruction, and Winters turns in another of her effective boorish turns. Sue Lyon got the most press at the time, and she's suitably pretty in a blank way. She has moments of subtle emoting, but whether that was from personal talent/choice or careful stewardship of the director, it's hard to tell. I had also forgotten that the movie was over 2 and a half hours long.  (8/10)

Source: Warner Blu-ray. The sole bonus feature is the original trailer. This is the only Kubrick film that has a bare-bones disc release.

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I happen to think that Lolita is one of the creepiest movies ever made.  Peter Sellers adds to that feeling most assuredly. 

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1 hour ago, LawrenceA said:

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A Clockwork Orange (1971) Dir: Stanley Kubrick - Hilarious family comedy about a young man (Malcolm McDowell) and his friends getting up to mischief and shenanigans. Featuring Warren Clarke, Patrick Magee, Aubrey Morris, Michael Bates, Philip Stone, Adrienne Corri, Miriam Karlin, Steven Berkoff, and David Prowse.

Kubrick's dystopian follow-up to the majestic, cerebral 2001 is a grueling, funny, disturbing, inventive romp. The protagonist's amorality in conflict with the state's invasive attempts at thought control stir up debate of freedom vs security, and the film offers no easy answers. The soundtrack, a mix of classical pieces and avant-garde electronic music, adds immensely to the atmosphere.  This film still packs a punch, and it now has the added pleasure of a lot of great 70's-future production design.  (10/10)

Source: Warner Blu-ray, with a few featurettes (two on the film's making, one profiling McDowell).

When my high school chum went off to college and left me behind to deal with high school, he gave me a copy of the book. My father was appalled and so was I after reading it. I liked it tho, but would never want to see the movie. Too much violence. 

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3 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I watched ISLE OF THE DEAD (1945) because it seemed relevant and it was on TCM ON DEMAND.

isle-of-the-dead2.jpg?w=650&h=366

The first time I saw this movie was on VHS in the late eighties, I was less than 12 years old. Like all the VAL LEWTON films, I think I would have genuinely liked it more if I had not read from SO MANY DIFFERENT SOURCES (books and magazines at the time) about what a genius LEWTON was. His films are fine, certainly smarter than your average horror  fair, and there is something very special about CURSE OF THE CAT PEOPLE, but a lot of the other films he produced are kinda slow going, and this one is no exception.

it's a looong hour and ten minutes, made interesting at times by the parallels to the current crisis (the plot is that people are quarintined on a GREEK ISLAND in 1912 during a war because a plague has emerged among them, there were even hand washing and social distancing scenes!

BORIS KARLOFF IS MISCAST IN THIS. He still gives it an A Effort (when didn't he?) but his role was, I would imagine, diminished by some real life health problems that postponed production and even cost the original lead actress. (His back injuries from FRANKENSTEIN were flaring up.)

d358yxu-3cbc893d-56cb-479f-8629-49992330

BORIS ALSO HAS A PERM IN THIS MOVIE (in 1930's/40's HOLLYWOOD, PERM=GREEK), WHICH DOES AN AWFUL LOT TO UNDERCUT WHATEVER GRAVITY HE COULD ACHIEVE IN HIS SUPPORTING PART. He looks an awful lot like my great grandmother.

this movie has one of MY FAVORITE CLASSIC HORROR TROPES, which is that the male romantic lead is USELESS and often wears jodhpurs.

the ending to this has stuck with me since that night watching the tape in the late 80's. it's surprisingly graphic for 1945.

spoilers kinda sorta below, and i apologize if this offends anyone BUT,

JASON ROBARDS SR. has a role in this as the owner of the Island, a SWISS antiques dealer without a hint of accent. It has been a very long time since I have seen a performance this bad in a film. he is terrible. every single one of his reads is as if he were in fact a Production Assistant dryly running lines with the actors before the cameras started rolling. he wrecks every scene he is in, and even manages to **** all over Boris's big death scene. it's been a while since i have seen a whole film undercut by such a weak acting job. AND before anyone gets mad at me, I think JASON ROBARDS JR was a fantastic actor and I will also entertain the possibility that the director (MARK ROBSON) was sabotaging him or maybe he was a great stage actor who just didn't know how to translate to film, especially a horror/fantasy film. nonetheless: DAMN HE IS SO BAAAAD IN THIS MOVIE!

I have to agree with you on Robard's performance. It most certainly stinks! This Val Lewton venture is quite creepy and very enjoyable. I often like to watch it with the lights turned low and most definitely during a lightening storm for atmosphere. 

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I don't think Karloff is miscast in this thing. I think he does a capable job and he is certainly creepy.  Most definitely cast as the killer general guy.  He did a great job.  No doubt about it, it's a spooky movie. 

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39 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

I have to agree with you on Robard's performance. It most certainly stinks! This Val Lewton venture is quite creepy and very enjoyable. I often like to watch it with the lights turned low and most definitely during a lightening storm for atmosphere. 

Robards, jr was a superb actor and won 2nd consecutive academy awards for s. actor

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1 hour ago, Janet0312 said:

I don't think Karloff is miscast in this thing. I think he does a capable job and he is certainly creepy.  Most definitely cast as the killer general guy.  He did a great job.  No doubt about it, it's a spooky movie. 

Maybe it’s that he’s so British I have sort of a hard time buying him as a Greek..(Although ironically he was an Anglo Indian in real life.)

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