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It seems I missed Last Of The Pagans last week and can find no track of it anywhere.

IMDB lists a running time of 70 minutes, but most copies seem to be shorter than that.

Does anyone know if TCM ran the full version?

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Just watched GILDA on TCM. I cannot believe I hadn't seen this before. Frankly, while I did enjoy it, I thought it was a little weird. Rita Hayworth was stunning. For some reason I haven't seen that many of her films. She is absolutely gorgeous and I completely fell in love with her character and her performance.  I get that she was so in love with Johnny that everything she did was to get his attention. Also I understand he thought she was unfaithful and just a party girl looking for a sugar daddy, but I never picked up on why they split in the first place. Also, how did a small time gambler and a night club dancer/singer from the US end up in   Buenos Aires?  I know a lot of Nazis fled there after the war, but having two average Americans go there was a bit of a reach for me.  Maybe I'm being too logical.  Anyway, I now plan to seek out more of Hayworth's films as she has now moved into my top tier of favorite actresses with Natalie, Audrey and Grace.

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Full Metal Jacket  (1987) Dir: Stanley Kubrick - War is Hell - Vietnam edition. With Matthew Modine, Vincent D'onofrio, R. Lee Ermey, Adam Baldwin, Arliss Howard, Dorian Harewood, Kevyn Major Howard, Ed O'Ross, John Terry, and Bruce Boa.

Kubrick uses the Vietnam War to illustrate how young men become killers. The film is unofficially divided into parts. The first half, detailing Marine basic training and the tragic effect it has one specific sad sack of a recruit (a brilliant turn by D'onofrio), is usually cited as the strongest, and it is. Yet the second half, following Modine's war reporter Joker as he experiences urban conflict and the fractured camaraderie of brothers-in-arms, is not without merit. R. Lee Ermey's performance as the ill-tempered drill sergeant has become a cultural touchstone, and many of the crude lines of dialogue throughout the film became oft-repeated catchphrases. A harrowing, funny, and unforgettable film.   (9/10)

Source: Warner Blu-ray, with a 30-minute making-of documentary included.

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It just struck me in watching "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" tonight.  Is there ANY other movie that began with a totally cold open like that, with a musical number right from the first frame?

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Eyes Wide Shut  (1999) Dir: Stanley Kubrick - A NY doctor (Tom Cruise) questions his sexual potency after imagining his wife (Nicole Kidman) having an affair. Also featuring Sydney Pollack, Thomas Gibson, Todd Field, Vinessa Shaw, Leelee Sobieski, Rade Serbedzija, and Alan Cumming.

Kubrick's final film is a clunky arthouse version of an erotic thriller, a particularly dubious sub-genre that was very popular in the 1990's, glutting video store shelves and late-night cable TV schedules. It arrived with much ballyhoo, unfortunately partly due to Kubrick's untimely death a few months before its release. This was my third time seeing it, and unlike his other films, I not only do not gain appreciation for it, but rather find myself liking it less. The script is weak, and Cruise doesn't have much screen charisma if he isn't jumping off buildings or hanging onto the outside of airplanes in flight. The uneven tone hints at the fact that Kubrick, who had been planning to make this film since the early 1970's at least, alternated between doing this straight-faced or completely comedic (at one time he considered Steve Martin for the lead role). There are still some well-shot sequences, and there's a semi-effective sense of dread over some of the film, but it all adds up to very little, and becomes occasionally unintentionally laughable.    (6/10)

Source: Warner Blu-ray, with a making-of documentary, a career retrospective, and a featurette on some of the films Kubrick planned but never got to make.

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9 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

many of the crude lines of dialogue throughout the film became oft-repeated catchphrases.

The very reason I abhor "catchphrases"- it assumes you've seen the movie and come off hollow & unclear when you haven't.

9 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

A harrowing, funny, and unforgettable film. 

Thanks for your personal impressions, not spoilers. I also appreciate your impression of Eyes Wide Shut, a movie I've only seen once, when it first came out. "A sense of dread" is how I remember feeling when watching it. I also had the impression if I had been watching this at home, I may not have stuck with it.

Thanks Lawrence for having a Kubrick festival & sharing your impressions here. I especially agree with your assessments of THE SHINING, one of my faves. I was most impressed with the sets: the decoration & size of the grand lobby, the claustrophobic disorientation of the hallways and the glittering ballroom.

9 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Kubrick uses the Vietnam War to illustrate how young men become killers.

Perfect sentence to succinctly say what it's about without spoiling the story!

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8 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

Eyes Wide Shut  (1999)

I always found the the business with all the dark robes particularly ridiculous. What planet was Stanley smoking? Its like a combo devil worship/schoolboys fantasy of what an ****  should be, no?

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10 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

 

Kubrick's final film is a clunky arthouse version of an erotic thriller, a particularly dubious sub-genre that was very popular in the 1990's, glutting video store shelves and late-night cable TV schedules.

a genre that- God help me- is dear to me. those were my teenage years and we stole pay-per-view and paid for CINEMAX (GOD BLESS IT) and I cannot tell you how many of those movies I have seen.

Literally, I can't even name most of them since they are all interchangeable noun/pronoun combos: Illicit Confessions, Dark Desire, Illicit Desires, Desirous Confessions...

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11 hours ago, overeasy said:

It just struck me in watching "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" tonight.  Is there ANY other movie that began with a totally cold open like that, with a musical number right from the first frame?

I think there are several, Li'l Abner (1959) being one example. Also Bye Bye Birdie (1963), etc.

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11 hours ago, LawrenceA said:

 

Eyes Wide Shut  (1999) Dir: Stanley Kubrick - A NY doctor (Tom Cruise) questions his sexual potency after imagining his wife (Nicole Kidman) having an affair. Also featuring Sydney Pollack, Thomas Gibson, Todd Field, Vinessa Shaw, Leelee Sobieski, Rade Serbedzija, and Alan Cumming.

Kubrick's final film is a clunky arthouse version of an erotic thriller, a particularly dubious sub-genre that was very popular in the 1990's, glutting video store shelves and late-night cable TV schedules.

I desperately want to love Kubrick's films. He went to my high school in the Bronx, a few decades before I did, so it's a matter of local pride. However, many of even his greatest films don't really totally connect with me.  I enjoy his films and love certain aspects (scenes, etc.) of most of them. I guess I would say, for me, the parts -- and the form -- are often greater than the whole.

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29 minutes ago, Swithin said:

I desperately want to love Kubrick's films. He went to my high school in the Bronx, a few decades before I did, so it's a matter of local pride. However, many of even his greatest films don't really totally connect with me.  I enjoy his films and love certain aspects (scenes, etc.) of most of them. I guess I would say, for me, the parts -- and the form -- are often greater than the whole.

i'VE BEEN (oops caps lock) posting on these boards for a loooooooooooooooooooooooong time, and I will let you know that whenever the name STANLEY KUBRICK comes up, the train is going off the tracks. He sparks PASSIONATE responses in people (which I think was deliberate on his part, he's a psychologically manipulative filmmaker [not saying that that is a bad thing]) he PROVOKES people.

Personally, I'm not a fan of a lot of works, but at the same time, PATHS OF GLORY is an out-and-out masterpiece, flawless save for a sabotage attempt from supporting actor TIMOTHY CAREY, and once somebody makes at LEAST ONE FILM THAT IS PERFECT OR CLOSE TO IT, then I cut them some slack on the rest of their stuff, because hitting a homer EVEN ONCE in the medium of filmmaking ain't easy. .

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In tangentially related classic film news, I created this miniature garden in front of my office and decided to name the glazed white mudman figurine YOJIMBO.

Half the roses are red and half are white, and he stands in the center, not serving either side.

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18 hours ago, Hoganman1 said:

Just watched GILDA on TCM. I cannot believe I hadn't seen this before. Frankly, while I did enjoy it, I thought it was a little weird. Rita Hayworth was stunning. For some reason I haven't seen that many of her films. She is absolutely gorgeous and I completely fell in love with her character and her performance.  I get that she was so in love with Johnny that everything she did was to get his attention. Also I understand he thought she was unfaithful and just a party girl looking for a sugar daddy, but I never picked up on why they split in the first place. Also, how did a small time gambler and a night club dancer/singer from the US end up in   Buenos Aires?  I know a lot of Nazis fled there after the war, but having two average Americans go there was a bit of a reach for me.  Maybe I'm being too logical.  Anyway, I now plan to seek out more of Hayworth's films as she has now moved into my top tier of favorite actresses with Natalie, Audrey and Grace.

I love “Gilda.”  I don’t think the movie ever says why Johnny and Gilda split in the first place. I think it was due to their intense love/hate relationship. They couldn’t be together but couldn’t not be together at the same time. 

I would speculate that they split, and had been apart for awhile. Gilda moves to Argentina, where she meets and marries Balin. Presumably she married him for his money, he married her because she could be a trophy on his arm. Then, when Johnny shows up in Argentina, his and Gilda’s love/hate for one another is rekindled. 

As for their appearance in Argentina, I think Balin’s side hustle (tungsten) took him there and the club was just an elaborate front or distraction from his true business. As for Johnny, I get the idea that he’s a bit of a drifter and has probably been all over the world. I will just accept the coincidence of him finding Gilda. My husband and I have seen people we know all the way at Disneyland (some 1,000 miles away from our town), so crazy things like this can happen. 

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The Delinquents  (1957) Dir: Robert Altman - In Kansas City, Missouri, a nice teenage boy (Tom Laughlin) falls in with a bad crowd. With Richard Bakalyan, Peter Miller, and Rosemary Howard.

After cutting his teeth on industrials and other short subjects, Altman directed the dubious documentary The James Dean Story (1957), and quickly followed it up with this JD cheapie, his first scripted feature. It was shot on location in Kansas City, where Altman was based at the time, and the director's 10-year-old daughter, as well as his second wife, both appear in it. The movie is fairly sedate for this sort of thing, and some of the acting is amateurish. Future Billy Jack star Laughlin was reportedly a major jerk on the set, having already appeared in some TV and a couple of features, and he looked down on this "low-rent" production. Bakalyan would go on to a lengthy career as a character actor. Altman would spend the next 10 years directing dozens of TV episodes.   (5/10)

Source: Olive Films DVD

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39 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I don't.

But I still respect it for what it is and like whispering "Gilda..." NUMEROUS TIMES while I watch it.

For me Gilda is like Laura.   Roger Ebert makes similar points about both of these early noir films.       There are some major plot flaws.   But one doesn't watch these films for realism,  but instead just for their style,  the interactions of the actors (with some great scenes in both),   etc.... 

 

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Countdown  (1967) Dir: Robert Altman - An American astronaut (James Caan) prepares for a dangerous solo space mission. With Robert Duvall, Joanna Moore, Barbara Baxley, Michael Murphy, Charles Aidman, Steve Ihnat, Mike Farrell, and Ted Knight.

The space race was at its height when Altman directed this dull docu-drama that strives to be as realistic as possible. I found it interesting to see future Godfather co-stars Caan and Duvall playing opposite each other. Here Caan is more subdued, while Duvall is the aggressive and hot-tempered one. Michael Murphy, playing another astronaut, would go on to be Altman's most frequent on-screen collaborator. Executive producer William Conrad can be heard as a TV announcer. 

Source: Warner Archive DVD

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40 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

For me Gilda is like Laura.   Roger Ebert makes similar points about both of these early noir films.       There are some major plot flaws.   But one doesn't watch these films for realism,  but instead just for their style,  the interactions of the actors (with some great scenes in both),   etc.... 

 

The flaws in LAURA don't bug me so bad as the ones in GILDA.

 

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1 minute ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

The flaws in LAURA don't bug me so bad as the ones in GILDA.

 

I can understand that;   the flaws in Gilda are more on the emotional  and relationship level while the ones in Larua are more procedural.    E.g.  the detective makes so many lame \ poor decisions that even a small town sheriff,  that has never death with a murder,  would never make.  

 

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The (not so) between-the-lines gay theme in Gilda may offer some clues as to why Johnny and Gilda split, Where do we meet Johnny at the start of the film? At a waterfront dive, where Munson is cruising with his "friend," i.e. his phallic walking stick. Munson picks Johnny up. Later in the film, the "stick" seems to have changed hands.

Johnny, voice over: "I knew about American sailors."

Johnny, to Munson, same scene: "You must lead a gay life."

Gilda, to Johnny, later: "How very pretty you look in your nightgown."

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That Cold Day in the Park  (1969) Dir: Robert Altman - A lonely, repressed woman (Sandy Dennis) invites an apparently homeless, mute young man (Michael Burns) she finds in a park into her luxury apartment. Also with Susanne Benton, John Garfield Jr., Luana Anders, and Michael Murphy.

Altman shows more creative growth in this unusual psycho-drama. He toys a bit with his soon-to-be-signature sound mixing (multiple voices overlapping in small-talk conversation), particularly in a stand-out scene in the lobby of a doctor's office where various women discuss birth control issues. The movie is a bit too sedate for me, and a lot of its then-titillating nudity seems quaint now, but Dennis gives a good performance.  (7/10)

Source: Olive Films DVD 

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MASH  (1970) Dir: Robert Altman - Hi-jinks abound at an Army field hospital near the front during the Korean War. With Donald Sutherland, Elliott Gould, Sally Kellerman, Robert Duvall, Tom Skerritt, Rene Auberjonois, John Schuck, Gary Berghoff, Jo Ann Pflug, Fred Williamson, Bud Cort, Ben Davidson, Michael Murphy, and Bobby Troup.

Altman's breakthrough film was a cultural phenomenon at the time, but it's since been overshadowed by the tamer, long-running TV series. I still enjoy the film's irreverent, anarchic spirit and deliberately-messy vibe, even if some of the humor hasn't aged well.   (8/10)

Source: Fox Blu-ray

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Brewster McCloud  (1970) Dir: Robert Altman - An eccentric oddball (Bud Cort) secretly living in the Houston Astrodome plots to build a flying machine so that he can be free as a bird. With Sally Kellerman, Shelley Duvall, Rene Auberjonois, Michael Murphy, William Windom, Bert Remsen, Jennifer Salt, John Schuck, Stacy Keach, and Margaret Hamilton.

An aggressively quirky counterculture time capsule, many modern viewers will be turned off by the bizarre story and outre characters. I happen to like it, and rank it among Altman's best. I enjoy the cast of weirdos, from Duvall (in her debut) as a stock-car driving tour guide, to Murphy playing a San Francisco "supercop" named Shaft that sports turtlenecks and piercing blue eyes. Keach is unrecognizable under heavy old age make-up, playing a miserly parody of Howard Hughes.   (8/10)

Source: Warner Archive DVD

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4 hours ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I can understand that;   the flaws in Gilda are more on the emotional  and relationship level while the ones in Larua are more procedural.    E.g.  the detective makes so many lame \ poor decisions that even a small town sheriff,  that has never death with a murder,  would never make.  

 

I think you all are correct. One has to just accept that there will be some things in a two hour movie that don't seem plausible in real life. That's probably why some of these newer shows on streaming sites use so many flashbacks to explain relationships between characters.

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11 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I don't.

But I still respect it for what it is and like whispering "Gilda..." NUMEROUS TIMES while I watch it.

I do something similar when watching “The Lion King.”

”Mufasa” 

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