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I Just Watched...

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Just now, Hibi said:

Has TCM ever shown this? I haven't seen it in many years. Would be a good choice for Noir Alley.

I do not think so, I even remember suggesting it once. It’s a paramount picture though so...

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1 minute ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I do not think so, I even remember suggesting it once. It’s a paramount picture though so...

Yeah, that's what I thought (Paramount). I saw it many years ago on the local Late Show.

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According to moviecollectoroh's database, TCM has shown The Accused five times, but the last time was October, 2002.

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LONG time ago. :(

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9 minutes ago, Hibi said:

LONG time ago. :(

PM me and I'll send whoever wants the link to live stream it on demand.

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Thanks, but I don't have access to streaming.

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6 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Thanks, but I don't have access to streaming.

No I mean right over the internet.  You an watch it right on your laptop or cast it to your TV,  just like Youtube 😎

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Thanks, but I don't like watching movies that way.

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31 minutes ago, Hibi said:

Thanks, but I don't like watching movies that way.

Casting a film to your TV is just like watching it on TCM. No difference.

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I have an old analog tv (one of the few left)

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10 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Casting a film to your TV is just like watching it on TCM. No difference.

I understand Hibi's reticence. Watching a movie on my computer isn't an option, I want to be in a comfy chair a good distance away, not sitting at a desk in my office.  How anyone could possibly watch a movie on their phone is beyond me.

Streaming free movies on your TV is ok, some uploads are rather poor quality, but at least the picture is bigger. But if I fall asleep, there's often no way to reverse to the last chapter remembered, like a DVD, especially if you've paid for the viewing! (I'm a snoozer even in a theater)

I do find streaming a great alternative for TV series, though. I'm rewatching CYBILL and TubiTV puts 2 commercial breaks in-where they belong. Pluto TV also offers CYBILL, but their commercial breaks are "timed" and can actually interrupt a punchline! Boo!

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So, I checked out THE ACCUSED (1949) on u-yay ube-tay (thanks CIGARJOE)

DAMN, I REALLY wish the whole movie was as good as the first half hour, which is- quite frankly- ahead of its time in its depiction of date r a p e, I would pair this film with JOHNNY BELINDA as examples of movies that, as a whole, aren't as good as they could be- but deserve commendation for their depictions of how hard it is to be a woman in a man's world.

I swear the shot of the ocean waves on the rocks is the same one used in ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN when the Wolf Man grabs Dracula (in bat form) and they plummet into the surf (since FARCIOT EDUARD (sp?) was the process photographer, it's entirely possible, I know he worked at Universal a lot.)

some background on the film copied and pasted from wikipedia (so grain of salt here):

Development

In June 1946 Hal Wallis bought the film rights to an unpublished novel by June Trusedell, Be Still, My Love for a reported price of $75,000. The film was to be a vehicle for Barbara Stanwyck and would be made at Paramount, where Wallis had based himself.[3] In December Wallis said filming would start in January.[4] It would be the first in Wallis' slate for 1947 with an overall budget of $8,500,000.[5] Filming was pushed back. In March Wallis said Don de Fore would co star with Stanwyck.[6]

By February 1947 Ginger Rogers had become star and Wallis was not going to make the film until he had finished shooting a movie in England.[7] In March Wallis said the stars would be Stanwyck and Wendell Corey and he would hold off filming until Corey returned from England where he was appearing on stage on Voice of the Turtle.[8]

In November 1947 Hedda Hopper reported that Stanwyck dropped out of the film because "the script was too stupid to shoot". Wallis put her in Sorry, Wrong Number (1948) instead the only other script he had ready to go.[9] That month Ketti Frings was reported as working on the script.[10]

In January 1948 Kirk Douglas, then under contract to Wallis, was linked to the project.[11]

Loretta Young

In February Wallis announced that Loretta Young would play the lead and the film would be called Strange Deception.[12] Young won an Oscar for The Farmer's Daughter after she had been signed to do the movie.

The other lead roles went to Bob Cummings and Wendell Corey, both of whom were under contract to Wallis. Young says that shortly before filming Wallis approached her suggesting that the two actors should swap roles, with Cummings to play the detective and Corey playing the male lead. Young said "I knew he wanted to switch because he had just put Wendell Corey under contract, and Robert Cummings was being eased out." Young said it was up to Wallis but felt Corey was not a leading man. "He was a very attractive second lead. Bob Cummings at one time was a leading man."[13]

Eventually the roles stayed as they are. Young said that possibly Wallis was right.

It was the eleventh film from Wallis since he set up his own production unit. Filming started April 1948.[14]

Young later said she "loved" the film and the script, saying Frings "was a wonderful writer... she knew and liked women... she also knew their stupid little frailties... a very good story."[15] She says Wallis "bent over backwards trying to do everything nice all during the picture."[16]

(end quote)

You can tell from watching this that BOB CUMMINGS knew his career was on the line, because he practically stands on his head and spits nickels during his final scenes- it's the most ACTING! I've ever seen him do. WENDELL COREY is surprisingly effective in his low-key role as an almost JAVERT-like police inspector, but I think it's more of a case of good casting than good acting.

STANWYCK would not have been right for this movie AT ALL.

Another rewrite would have also helped immeasurably.

it is worth noting that in the scene where LORETTA kills her would-be attacker- she KEEPS BEATING THE HELL OUT OF THE GUY LONG AFTER HE HAS BEEN SUBDUED, to a point where- I dunno- a manslaughter conviction wouldn't have been entirely off-base.

bottom line: don't **** with Loretta, she'll put your butt in the microwave.

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I understand Hibi's reticence. Watching a movie on my computer isn't an option, I want to be in a comfy chair a good distance away, not sitting at a desk in my office.  How anyone could possibly watch a movie on their phone is beyond me.

I must not be making myself clear to you all.

I'll try again. Believe it or not, for those of you who have smart phones along with a laptop, desktop whatever. The phone actually casts better to the TV than my lap top. I'm not saying watch the film on the phone I'm saying cast the film to your TV from your phone.  I find there are more buffering problems, pauses, and other problems casting from an older  computer that has a lot of programs running in the background, than from a phone that has virtually nothing.

Quote

Streaming free movies on your TV is ok, some uploads are rather poor quality, but at least the picture is bigger. But if I fall asleep, there's often no way to reverse to the last chapter remembered, like a DVD, especially if you've paid for the viewing! (I'm a snoozer even in a theater)

Some uploads are Poor Quality for some films, and for some films that may be your only option. But there are more platforms to check besides Youtube.

Quote

I do find streaming a great alternative for TV series, though. I'm rewatching CYBILL and TubiTV puts 2 commercial breaks in-where they belong. Pluto TV also offers CYBILL, but their commercial breaks are "timed" and can actually interrupt a punchline! Boo!

I've been watching the Beverly Hillbillies (what a hoot) starting at season one as background when nothing interesting for films are on TCM, best part no commercials and you an pause if you need to.

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note: in re-reading that wikipedia entry, I have SERIOUS DOUBTS that this film was budgeted at 8.5 MILLION DOLLARS, that was, in 1940's numbers, something like $100 million dollars and four times the gross of the average film. Maybe they adjusted for inflation....

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2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I understand Hibi's reticence. Watching a movie on my computer isn't an option, I want to be in a comfy chair a good distance away, not sitting at a desk in my office.  How anyone could possibly watch a movie on their phone is beyond me.

I also still have an analog TV! So, I don't do any of this"casting" either, a term I still don't fully grasp (like casting a spell?). But I have taken to occasionally watching some streamed movies on my laptop. I understand your issues with doing this, but I guess it hasn't bothered me enough to keep me from doing it once in a while. I don't think I've ever watched a movie on my phone.

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Casting is using a network (most often your home's WiFi) to transfer audio and/or video from one connected device to another.  The receiver has to be compliant with the sender (i.e., there's not one universal casting standard that works across all devices, platforms, operating systems and applications).     For me, the most useful application is when you're traveling, as the viewing options at the hotel may be limited.  If you're in a hotel with a smart TV, you can use your phone, tablet or laptop to connect to the TV and watch what you want  on a bigger screen.

Cast is just the shortened version of broadcast.  No voodoo or witchcraft is involved, unless you view technology as magic!

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STRANGE AFFAIR (1944) *Score: 3/5* 

Starring: Allyn Joslyn, Evelyn Keyes, Nina Foch. 

This is an enjoyable little murder mystery comedy; I'd never heard of it but I found it while browsing YouTube. I already was familiar with Allyn Joslyn (from "It Shouldn't Happen to a Dog," with Carole Landis), and I knew Evelyn Keyes was in Gone with the Wind, but I'd never seen her in a more comedic role before. She was quite likable and charming. I think of them as the "poor man's Nick and Nora Charles" (although they are wonderful in their own way). I found another they did together entitled "Dangerous Blondes" (1943). I am intrigued, to say the least. 

Strange Affair (1944) Alfred E. Green, Allyn Joslyn, Evelyn Keyes ...

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2 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

note: in re-reading that wikipedia entry, I have SERIOUS DOUBTS that this film was budgeted at 8.5 MILLION DOLLARS, that was, in 1940's numbers, something like $100 million dollars and four times the gross of the average film. Maybe they adjusted for inflation....

I was going to bring that up! LOL. More like 850,000 probably.

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2 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

I also still have an analog TV! So, I don't do any of this"casting" either, a term I still don't fully grasp (like casting a spell?). But I have taken to occasionally watching some streamed movies on my laptop. I understand your issues with doing this, but I guess it hasn't bothered me enough to keep me from doing it once in a while. I don't think I've ever watched a movie on my phone.

So there are at least 2 of us! :D

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2 hours ago, sewhite2000 said:

I also still have an analog TV! So, I don't do any of this"casting" either, a term I still don't fully grasp (like casting a spell?). But I have taken to occasionally watching some streamed movies on my laptop. I understand your issues with doing this, but I guess it hasn't bothered me enough to keep me from doing it once in a while. I don't think I've ever watched a movie on my phone.

If you think about it though if you lay down in a dark room and hold the phone about a foot from your face you'd get a facsimile of watching your TV,

lol

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26 minutes ago, Hibi said:

So there are at least 2 of us! :D

I recently ditched my last CRT set - a 13 inch Sony dating from 1991.  I used it in my office, connected to a standard def cable box from Verizon FiOS (now Frontier).  When I called a couple of months ago to cut off my cable, they only sent me one box to return their HD cable box.  I called in (again) to ask about their standard def box.  The rep said "Oh, we don't want those back.  We haven't provided them for awhile now."  Yet, they were still charging me for it every month.  So glad I got rid of cable!

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1 hour ago, NickAndNora34 said:

I knew Evelyn Keyes was in Gone with the Wind, but I'd never seen her in a more comedic role before. She was quite likable and charming.

Agreed. She holds high regard among Cinephiles, but remains mostly undiscovered to average classic movie fans. I was most impressed with her after seeing Julie Christie ruin the same role Keyes played in HEAVEN CAN WAIT and HERE COMES MR JORDON respectively.

4 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

I must not be making myself clear to you all.

Oops, sorry. I don't have a cel phone, so I misunderstood what you were saying.

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2 hours ago, txfilmfan said:

I recently ditched my last CRT set - a 13 inch Sony dating from 1991.  I used it in my office, connected to a standard def cable box from Verizon FiOS (now Frontier).  When I called a couple of months ago to cut off my cable, they only sent me one box to return their HD cable box.  I called in (again) to ask about their standard def box.  The rep said "Oh, we don't want those back.  We haven't provided them for awhile now."  Yet, they were still charging me for it every month.  So glad I got rid of cable!

Mine is a 17-inch RCA model from 1989. I was under some financial stress early last year and ended up going four months without cable TV or internet, which I got from the same provider. When I finally got matters rectified, I found out I had to get all-new equipment. They were grandfathering my old account on the standard def box I had, but this was considered a brand new account, and they weren't issuing that obsolete equipment anymore. They didn't want the old box back, either. I've still got it in my closet.

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Two rentals, one from the mail-renal service Facets, one from the local video store, today....

The mail service one was the 1958 film by Sanjait Ray, The music Room, which was a pretty interesting elegiac look at the waning days of a formerly wealthy Indian man and the crumbling of his life. Its ending is a bit abrupt, but it is still deeply moving and fascinating in its look at another culture.....

The one from the rental store is 2019's Motherless Brooklyn, and to cut directly to the chase, it is the return of Chinatown. it is almost as though, almost 30 years down the road from The Two Jakes, we finally got the third part of the JJ Gittes trilogy. Of course though, instead of Nicholson, we have Edward Norton as our lead, playing a detective who has a sharp interior mind, but is crippled by Tourette's and nervous tics. But that does not stop him from investigating this twisty, turny case involving murder and reckless land development. This has been Norton's passion project for 20 years, and the neglect and indifference it received from audiences and movie critics is simply appalling. Yes, it is probably a bit too indebted to Chinatown, and the copious amounts of swearing feel out of place for a film set in 1957. But it is also so incredibly well acted by everyone, so deeply affecting, such a gorgeous looking production, with such a great jazz score, and in a rich noir tradition that any complaint feels trivial.... In short not just one of the best of 2019, but also one of the best of its decade. Highly recommended.

--------

I'm also finishing up one on Amazon prime I started the other day, the charming 40 Carats (1973) and I had started looking at another so-far-glorious rental, Diary of a Country Priest (1950), which i am eagerly looking forward to continuing when I get home. Seems like a masterpiece so far......

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If you like Diary of a Country Priest and haven't seen A Man Escaped or Les Dames du Bois de Boulogne, those would be good ones to seek out. Bresson's view of God has changed, and not for the better, by Au hasard Balthazar, which some like but I destest.

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