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Saturday afternoon, I caught the entire 4-film showings that Dave Karger had on offer.  It's not very often I like so many films TCM shows in succession like that, but I liked each of them (Captain Blood, Out Of The Past, The Naked Spur, and The Hill).  Maybe it's because it was laden with a lot of testosterone...I dunno.  Only 'Out Of The Past' had multiple female parts that were vital to the story.  I also thought it was interesting that Dave's picks spanned four consecutive decades (30's, 40's, 50's, and 60's).  Was that by design or just a coincidence?  I don't know, but it made for a nice Saturday afternoon of viewing pleasure.

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Lightning Strikes Twice (1934)

Dumb but amiable comedy mystery starts promisingly with lightning, gun shots and a scream all heard in the first minute of the film. Soon two investigating cops, playing it more like Keystone Kops, both somehow wind up falling into the sewer system by a house where the gun shots were fired. They will spend most of the film there while, inside the house the next morning, we are introduced to Ben Lyon sleeping off a hangover in his bed. In that bed with him is pal Skeets Gallagher. We're not supposed to read anything into this sleeping arrangement as Ben is engaged to beautiful Thelma Todd and who is their right mind, unless drunk, would rather spend their bedtime with Skeets than Thelma?

The mystery elements of the story are soon replaced by broad comedy with a wide eyed guy who fired the shots hiding in various closets in the house (no one ever seems to spot him) while a couple of vaudeville performers, played by Walter Catlett and fan dancer Pert Kelton, are sleeping in another bedroom, trying to figure out how they can scam home owner Lyon whose car crashed into their's the night before. Meanwhile rich aunt Laura Hope Crews shows up at the home and somehow gets the impression that Kelton is Ben's fiancee, an impression which, for some inexplicable reason, he doesn't correct though it does lead to the usual mistaken identity comedy situations.

This  RKO comedy moves at a brisk pace and runs barely more than an hour. Lyon is hopeless in this kind of farce and Thelma Todd, an often delightful comedienne, is sadly wasted in it. In a comedy that is, unfortunately, more frantic than funny, Catlett and Kelton remain the film's two bright spots. It's not surprising that five years later Crews would be cast as Aunt Pitty Pat in Gone With The Wind as she almost seems to be playing the same daffy role in this film.

Oh, yes, the film does brighten a bit towards the end when Fred Kelsey, who made a career of playing dumb detectives, turns up in the household to play, guess what, a dumb detective. You may not recognize the name but film buffs of '30s and '40s films sure will recognize the face. Chick Chandler also keeps popping up as an eager crime beat reporter who keeps yelling, "What a story! What a story!"

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Fred Kelsey

This is the kind of little film that you'd like to give a higher rating because of the likability of the cast but the general lameness of the script prevents you from doing so. Nevertheless, should Lightning Strikes Twice turn up on TCM (which it has in the past though I have no idea how long ago) you could do worse than tune in to this time waster.

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2 out of 4

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4 hours ago, midwestan said:

Saturday afternoon, I caught the entire 4-film showings that Dave Karger had on offer.  It's not very often I like so many films TCM shows in succession like that, but I liked each of them (Captain Blood, Out Of The Past, The Naked Spur, and The Hill).  Maybe it's because it was laden with a lot of testosterone...I dunno.  Only 'Out Of The Past' had multiple female parts that were vital to the story.  I also thought it was interesting that Dave's picks spanned four consecutive decades (30's, 40's, 50's, and 60's).  Was that by design or just a coincidence?  I don't know, but it made for a nice Saturday afternoon of viewing pleasure.

I hadn't thought about it, but that is a lot of testosterone, isn't it? Four different genres, four really good films.

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NIGHT ON EARTH (1991) *Score: 2/5* 

Vignette-driven film that deals with several different taxi drivers and their fares across the globe. I got recommended this one for a special event we do in my film club; I didn't really enjoy  it all that much. The Winona Ryder/Gena Rowlands story was my favorite one, though. 

Janus Films — Night on Earth

DEAD MAN (1995) *Score: 2/5* 

Another Jim Jarmusch vehicle; I don't think I'm a fan of his work. I wanted to try something new, so I put this on one day. I do like Johnny Depp though. I think what threw me off with this one, is the fact that the entire score was made up of the sound of an electric guitar being tuned. It started to get on my nerves about 5 minutes in. 

DEAD MAN: “acid western” meets noir nightmare - The Cinemachina

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Just watched ANATOMY OF A MURDER on MOVIES.  I had seen it before, but not recently.  What a great cast.  James Stewart is as good as ever and I love Eve Arden as his assistant.  However, Lee Remick steals the show in what I'm guessing was one of her first performances.  I think my favorite character is the judge played by Joseph Welch, a real lawyer who became famous for his questioning of Senator Joe McCarthy.  "At long last; have you know sense of decency?' has since become an iconic phrase.  While I'm sure most of you have seen it, if you haven't; it's well worth your time.

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Gorky Park (1983).

William Hurt plays a Moscow police officer assigned to investigate a brutal triple murder that may have ties to the KGB and the Americans as one of the victims turns out to be an American.  Hurt's investigation gets him in trouble with the KGB, and the possible American suspect, furrier Lee Marvin.  He also runs into another American, Brian Dennehy, who has a personal reason for wanting the case closed if not accurately solved.

A mostly good story that bogs down as the final act moves from Moscow to Stockholm.  Thankfully, none of the actors playing Soviets (including a small part by Alexander Knox) essays a phony Russian accent.

7/10.

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I've been enjoying World on Fire on PBS. It's a big well-done WWII historical soap opera. Season 1, just finished but no doubt available on demand, had seven episodes set in 1939 with scenes in England, Poland, France, and Germany. The show has been renewed for Season 2, but who knows when it will be filmed, given the coronavirus. In addition to the young actors playing the romantic leads, stars include Helen Hunt as an American journalist (evidently based in part on Dorothy Thompson) and Sean Bean as the working-class socialist pacifist father of our plucky heroine Lois. However, Lesley Manville as the chilly mother of our hero Harry steals every moment of every scene she's in. A breathtaking performance of a character who could easily be a stereotype.

Some of the period details are bent a little to fit our current preferences. Would a black singer have been a headliner for the British equivalent of the USO, or would that group allow an unmarried pregnant woman as a headliner? Would Harry's mother and Lois' father call each other by their first names, given the class system at the time? On the other hand, I'm delighted we have a gay subplot, with an American doctor in Paris in love with a French North African jazz musician. I doubt that any jazz musician in France at that time would have a ripped and toned body, but oh well. I've noticed that several recent British films and TV shows (the Branagh Murder on the Orient Express and Darkest Hour, for instance) have gone out of their way to play down the actual British racial attitudes at the time. If you have known Brits of a certain age, this will ring false.

All in all, World on Fire has been great fun to follow, and I just hope it will survive.

 

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On 5/17/2020 at 10:47 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

DEAD MAN (1995) *Score: 2/5* 

Another Jim Jarmusch vehicle; I don't think I'm a fan of his work. I wanted to try something new, so I put this on one day. I do like Johnny Depp though. I think what threw me off with this one, is the fact that the entire score was made up of the sound of an electric guitar being tuned. It started to get on my nerves about 5 minutes in. 

This was Robert Mitchum's final film..... Regarding Jaramusch, I did like his Paterson from 2016. It's a simple, gentle tale of a few ordinary days in the life of a bus driver and his wife. He writes poetry on the side, she wishes to become a country singer. It's a quiet film, and nothing "major" or "earth-shattering" happens but its a gentle sweet picture of marriage and ordinary life.

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"Aquaman" (2019), the plot to too outlandish and bizarre.

Definitely another fish story. :wacko:

aquaman-800x450.jpg

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4 hours ago, hamradio said:

"Aquaman" (2019), the plot to too outlandish and bizarre.

aquaman-800x450.jpg

And THIS is why comic book/action movies FAIL.

Sure, this is absolutely a beautiful picture, but it has nothing our brains can recognize as "place" as setting for charactors.

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I know in contrast this is boring & unimaginative, but our brains recognize this as a solid, real place. A setting for a story.

I like movies that bring you "where no man has gone before" - imaginary times & places as much as the next guy. But I also know much needs to be grounded in what we recognise & can relate with. How else can we become interested in a fantastical story? And follow fantastical charactors in the story? 

The other big FAIL is making the charactors move (fly) too fast. We can't focus on the movement, nor focus on the setting therefore missing the eye/brain/stomach drop effect you get from just watching a rollercoaster video.

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4 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

And THIS is why comic book/action movies FAIL.

Just the Warner/DC ones.  (Which this very DEFINITELY was, as it was supposed to stoke the fires for Justice League's solo-spinoff "universe", and then later, was supposed to pull it out of the fire...And nobody over-does it like Warner/DC.)  And wait, Sony's still trying to make them too, aren't they?

Oh, and Marvel's Black Widow.  Let's face it, the poison's in the system, and they're just not going to recover after Captain Marvel...Condition fatal.  😪

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On 5/14/2020 at 6:01 AM, TikiSoo said:

I understand Hibi's reticence. Watching a movie on my computer isn't an option, I want to be in a comfy chair a good distance away, not sitting at a desk in my office.  How anyone could possibly watch a movie on their phone is beyond me.

I'm also not a huge fan of watching movies on a phone, but I do like watching on a laptop with headphones, 

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On 5/7/2020 at 8:58 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

NOISES OFF (1992) 

Starring: Carol Burnett, Christopher Reeve, Michael Caine, Marilu Henner, Nicollette Sheridan, Julie Hagerty, John Ritter. 

My friend George from my film club recommended this movie to me, and I watched it 5 times in 4 days... So fill in the blank on whether I liked it or not. I have become quite a fan of Peter Bogdanovich lately, and am excited to see more of his work (I have seen Targets, What's Up Doc, Paper Moon in addition to this one). 

I loved NOISES OFF and recommended it to my sister but she got bored with the set up and stopped watching before she got to the really crazy  part (which I think she would have laughed hysterically at). Oh well . . .

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I just watched a Ginger Rogers double feature recorded last month on TCM

First movie was 1940's LUCKY PARTNERS:  Ginger was in typical form as a no nonsense gal working in her mother's storefront bookstore. Spring Byington played her ditzy but insightful Mother perfectly, they even share some resemblance. Ginger's engaged to Jack Carson who's all business. Ronald Coleman's character moves into a storefront opposite the bookstore & casually wishes Ginger good luck in passing. She receives a gorgeous gown by chance when home delivering some books and immediately credits Colman. Then Ginger asks Colman to go halfsies on a sweepstakes ticket, thinking they're a lucky pair.

Colman agrees, but only if she take an elaborate platonic vacation with him if they win. Naturally, no one likes this scenario, but they go along with it. Screwball hilarity should follow but instead the movie comes to an awkward thud.

I'm not sure why this misfires, all the performances are good. Something about the dialogue just falls flat. I was never quite convinced Ginger was her typical smart, wisecracking nice girl...she often came across as dull & callous, especially to Carson. I've never liked Colman, but he did a fine job as a suave rich guy as always. Like I said, it must have been the dialogue.

Lucky_Partners_film_poster.jpg

Next was 5th AVENUE GIRL '39. I had seen this several times before but in comparison to the first movie, this print looked awful, like a Xerox copy. Too bad because it's a great movie-just as silly a premise as Lucky Partners, but somehow this one gels perfectly.

Ginger is her typical wisecracking Depression era girl, having a 5¢ apple for dinner in the Park. She meets wealthy Walter Connolly who has left the house in disgust that no one in his self absorbed family remembered his birthday. He & Ginger exchange some banter & he offers her a job to play "the other woman" just to jolt his wife, son & daughter into noticing him.

This time it works-screwball hilarity ensues. Maybe Ginger does better with a better leading actor like Connolly. All the supporting actors are excellent - especially fave Franklin Pangborn having more screen time & zingers than usual. This was the first time I noticed Tim Holt of MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS playing the spoiled son & Veree Teasdale Menjou playing the unfaithful but repentant wife. 

A great fun screwball comedy that deserves restoration!

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220px-5thAveGirlPoster.jpg

Funny note-Jack Carson stands out in a bit role in 5th Ave Girl as a sailor singing to his girl on a park bench.

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TCM's salute to Asian-American actors and actresses has concluded, and overall, I liked what was on offer.  I was a bit disappointed that 'The World of Suzie Wong' was not shown, since Nancy Kwan was a guest host with Dave Karger.  The picture has only featured on TCM 5 times since the station went on air, with the most previous showing held in April, 2018, which was nearly 10 years after its previous air time (June, 2008).  World Entertainment is shown as the production company, according to IMDB, but it seems that Paramount had a significant hand in bringing Suzie Wong to the big screen, so that could be the reason for its sparse scheduling here.  Conversely, 'Flower Drum Song' has been shown on TCM 23 times, but the May 20th screening was the first time since June, 2011.  'The Crimson Kimono', which I had never seen until it aired a couple of weeks ago, has been shown just 6 times by TCM, and two of those times were this month, as part of the Asian-American tribute and Noir Alley.  'The Phantom of Chinatown' was an OK mystery movie, but it's only been on air 5 times, and this month's showing was its first dust-off since June, 2008.  Thanks again to moviecollectoroh and his comprehensive database that allows us to harvest cool information like this!

I had never seen 'Sayonara' in its entirety until Wednesday night and emotionally, it runs the gamut with the viewer.  It's very sad and disturbing while also providing hopefulness and optimism.  The characterizations and portrayals were honest by the cast whether you agreed or disagreed with the person's dialogue and how they projected themselves.  Of course, Marlon Brando mumbled throughout a good portion of the picture, and as annoying as he sounded, I got past that and thought he gave a nice performance.  It wasn't lost on me that his attitude toward servicemen from America falling in love and wanting to marry a Japanese girl progressed as the movie went on, while the American girl he spurned, played by Patricia Owens, began to appreciate Japanese culture and wisdom, as her attitude became more enamored and enlightened by hanging around Ricardo Montalban's character (Mr. Nakamura).  Red Buttons and Myoshi Umeki swept the Best Supporting Actor and Actress awards in 1957.  Buttons gave a great performance in his role.  Umeki practically rivaled Gloria Grahame's oft criticized win for her brief role in 'The Bad and The Beautiful'.  I just didn't think there was enough in her performance to warrant a nomination, but looking at the list of competitors, maybe 1957 was a weak year for the Supporting Actress category (although I haven't seen Carolyn Jones' performance in 'The Bachelor Party' to be fully confident of my assessment here).  I thought Umeki brought a lot more substance to the role she played in 'Flower Drum Song'.

I was curious as to why TCM only provided 3 Wednesdays of programming for Asian-American portrayals.  I think there's enough stuff in the library that could have provided a 4th week of shows.  'Shanghai Express' and 'Across The Pacific' are two that come to mind.  Anna Mae Wong and Victor Sen Young were very good in both their roles in those respective films.   

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2 hours ago, midwestan said:

I had never seen 'Sayonara' in its entirety until Wednesday night and emotionally, it runs the gamut with the viewer.  It's very sad and disturbing while also providing hopefulness and optimism.  The characterizations and portrayals were honest by the cast whether you agreed or disagreed with the person's dialogue and how they projected themselves.  Of course, Marlon Brando mumbled throughout a good portion of the picture, and as annoying as he sounded, I got past that and thought he gave a nice performance.  It wasn't lost on me that his attitude toward servicemen from America falling in love and wanting to marry a Japanese girl progressed as the movie went on, while the American girl he spurned, played by Patricia Owens, began to appreciate Japanese culture and wisdom, as her attitude became more enamored and enlightened by hanging around Ricardo Montalban's character (Mr. Nakamura).  Red Buttons and Myoshi Umeki swept the Best Supporting Actor and Actress awards in 1957.  Buttons gave a great performance in his role.  Umeki practically rivaled Gloria Grahame's oft criticized win for her brief role in 'The Bad and The Beautiful'.  I just didn't think there was enough in her performance to warrant a nomination, but looking at the list of competitors, maybe 1957 was a weak year for the Supporting Actress category (although I haven't seen Carolyn Jones' performance in 'The Bachelor Party' to be fully confident of my assessment here).  I thought Umeki brought a lot more substance to the role she played in 'Flower Drum Song'.

I was curious as to why TCM only provided 3 Wednesdays of programming for Asian-American portrayals.  I think there's enough stuff in the library that could have provided a 4th week of shows.  'Shanghai Express' and 'Across The Pacific' are two that come to mind.  Anna Mae Wong and Victor Sen Young were very good in both their roles in those respective films.   

Carolyn Jones had a very short role in The Bachelor Party. She's a standout, but isn't on screen long. Miyoshi Umeki's win was considered one of the big upsets.

Anna May Wong is wonderful in Shanghai Express.

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10 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Carolyn Jones had a very short role in The Bachelor Party. She's a standout, but isn't on screen long. Miyoshi Umeki's win was considered one of the big upsets.

Anna May Wong is wonderful in Shanghai Express.

I agree,  Anna May Wong is wonderful,  period.       I really need to watch more of her films but I"m glad that TCM showed the ones that they did.

Shanghai Express

 

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I had always avoided Quality Street, since it's often cited as one of the films that made Katharine Hepburn "box-office poison," but watched it yesterday and quite liked it. Granted, it's an artificial comedy by J. M. Barrie that will not be to everyone's taste. Quality Street is a neighborhood with more than its share of old maids with not much to do but observe and comment on everything that goes on. This is especially true of Estelle Winwood, Helena Grant, and Florence Lake, a formidable trio. It's 1805, and Phoebe (Katharine Hepburn) believes she's about to receive a proposal of marriage from Dr. Brown (Franchot Tone). Instead, he announces he's off to fight in the war against Napoleon.

Ten years later, Phoebe feels like she's lost her looks and is turning into an old maid. Dr. Brown doesn't even recognize her at first, so she pretends to be her niece Livvie, a flirtatious little minx. Will Dr. Brown prefer Phoebe or Livvie, and will the local gossips confirm their suspicions that there is no such person as Livvie? Some serious matters arise during all the artifice: does a woman have to be young and silly, or at least pretend to be, if she wants a husband? How do unmarried women live out their lives in this society? The war, of course, is taking away potential husbands; this was a problem in Britain in the aftermath of WWI when so many men were killed.

Thus must be Eric Blore's manliest role, as he plays a recruiting sergeant who is rather taken by Patty (Cora Witherspoon), the domestic servant of Phoebe and her older sister Susan (Fay Bainter). Lots of mugging by Blore, Cora Witherspoon, and Estelle Winwood, and Fay Bainter provides some touching moments as she shows her younger sister the wedding dress she was never able to use. This is one of the few George Stevens movies that isn't too long; his comedies usually drag out their resolutions until I just want the film to be over.

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IN A LONELY PLACE (1950) *Score: 3/5* (Bogie's character made me so angry; I'm sorry) 

Starring: Humphrey Bogart, Gloria Grahame, Frank Lovejoy, Carl Benton Reid. 

I finally got around to finishing this; it's on the Criterion channel, but the site kept buffering for me for so long that I gave up for a while. I am glad I returned; this one was pretty solid. I thought it was quite interesting to see Bogie in a more despicable role than usual. Even when he's playing a tough guy he still manages to be quite likable. I guess you could say he had the range. 

In a Lonely Place review – Bogart still captivatingly cynical in ...

THE RED SHOES (1948) *Score: 3.5 (low 4)/5* 

I was given this film to watch through the "secret cinema" (basically secret santa) bi-weekly event I participate in for my film club, and I was pretty excited because I've been wanting to watch this for a while now. As someone who appreciates the arts, I enjoy films surrounding them as well. Powell and Pressburger really knew how to use color and light in their films. Between this one and "Black Narcissus" (1947), I can't help but observe how pretty they both are (A Matter of Life and Death is next on my list). 

The 35th Best Director of All-Time: Michael Powell - The Cinema ...

WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT (1988) *Score: 3.5/5* 

The cinematography and dialogue are better than they should be, almost. One of my friends absolutely loves this one, so I finally got around to watching it. It was definitely a lot of fun, and the majority of the special effects still held up today. 

Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) - About the Movie | Amblin

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Well, when it comes to smoking in films I think I may have seen it all now.  In the British film, Broken Journey (1948) someone offers a man in an iron lung a cigarette.  :lol:

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59 minutes ago, Bogie56 said:

Well, when it comes to smoking in films I think I may have seen it all now.  In the British film, Broken Journey (1948) someone offers a man in an iron lung a cigarette.  :lol:

See also: CRY BABY (1988)

”AW CHRIST, NOW I GOT A FLAT TIRE!!!”

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The Human Jungle (1954) Cop Shop Noir

71mqqhOVVIL._AC_SY879_.jpg

The director Joseph M. Newman didn't readily ring any bells so looked him.up. Newman is responsible for 711 Ocean Drive, and a recent discovery Death in Small Doses. Both pretty good Noirs. He also directed the studio bound Dangerous Crossing and later some twilight Zone episodes. The cinematographer Ellis W. Carter did a couple of Noirs I've never heard of Big Town After Dark and Waterfront at Midnight. The well polished screenplay was by Daniel Fuchs and William Sackheim.

Fuchs has a pretty good pedigree in noir responsible for The Gangster, Hollow Triumph, Criss Cross, Panic in the Streets and Storm Warning. Sackheim adapted 3D Noir Man in the Dark. The music for Human Jungle was by Hans J. Salter.

So who starred in it?, is probably your next question. Garry Merrill he really impressed me with his portrayal of wise **** hood Tommy Scalisi opposite Dana Andrews in Where The Sidewalk Ends.

He didn't have to go over the top like Widmark doing that other Tommy, "have a nice trip down the stairs Mrs. Rizzo," Tommy Udo. Merrill sold Scalisi with his cool delivery and his stance. He sold it and you bought it. What Merrill does here is portraying his range. He's equally believable to me as a smart hard as nails police reformer Police Capt. John Danforth. Then watch his broken on the wagon wino in the Transitional Noir The Incident.

What also makes you wonder why The Human Jungle isn't more well known is the equally exceptional performances of rest of the cast.

Jan Sterling plays a stripper/hooker Mary Abbott, I've never seen her look better and she was a veteran of seven noirs prior to this role (she is also in The Incident). Regis Toomey fits the part of Det. Bob Geddes like putting on an old pair of comfortable slippers. Chuck Connors really sines as meathead, gang muscle Earl Swados. Then you have, perennially popping up as a cop, Emile Meyer as Police Chief Abe Rowan and the equally adept James Westerfield as Police Capt. Marty Harrison. Claude Akins is the mob connected owner of the Hutch, George Mandy.  The rest of the cast just add to the realism. Lamont Johnson as Det. Lannigan is great and looks amazingly like Tom Hanks, Patrick Waltz as Det. Strauss, Paula Raymond as Pat Danforth, Gary Merrill's wife. The rest, George Wallace as Det. O'Neill, Chubby Johnson as Greenie and, Florenz Ames as Leonard Ustick are equally believable.


It's a well executed film from Allied Artists, and when you're not expecting too much going into it you get a pleasant surprise with what was achieved.

 It's not so much about solving a crime as it is about the change in the characters getting there. Its a bit studio bound and could have used more location shots. 8/10 Full review with some sreencaps  in Film Noir/Gangster Pages.

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21 hours ago, midwestan said:

 

I had never seen 'Sayonara' in its entirety until Wednesday night ....  Umeki practically rivaled Gloria Grahame's oft criticized win for her brief role in 'The Bad and The Beautiful'.  I just didn't think there was enough in her performance to warrant a nomination, but looking at the list of competitors, maybe 1957 was a weak year for the Supporting Actress category (although I haven't seen Carolyn Jones' performance in 'The Bachelor Party' to be fully confident of my assessment here).  I thought Umeki brought a lot more substance to the role she played in 'Flower Drum Song'.

I was curious as to why TCM only provided 3 Wednesdays of programming for Asian-American portrayals.  I think there's enough stuff in the library that could have provided a 4th week of shows.  'Shanghai Express' and 'Across The Pacific' are two that come to mind.  Anna Mae Wong and Victor Sen Young were very good in both their roles in those respective films.   

 

18 hours ago, kingrat said:

Carolyn Jones had a very short role in The Bachelor Party. She's a standout, but isn't on screen long. Miyoshi Umeki's win was considered one of the big upsets.

Great write-up, Midwestan...

I am not sure if they are showing THE SON-DAUGHTER (1932?) with HELEN HAYES and a surprisingly good RAMON NOVARRO- maybe not since two of the stars are doing "yellow-face"- but, in spite of HAYES'S lousy performance, IT'S INTERESTING and the ENDING IS CRAZY!!!

I have never seen SAYONARA because I do not like BRANDO and I am allowed to not like BRANDO.

the nominees for BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN 1957 WERE:

ELSA LANCHESTER for WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION/ HOPE LANGE in PEYTON PLACE/ DIANE VARSI in PEYTON PLACE/ MIYOSKI UMEKI in SAYONARA/ CAROLYN JONES in THE BACHELOR PARTY

All five of these women had their careers stall in the next decade (although JONES found success on TV) and none were nominated again. I think ELSA LANCHESTER was the favorite for multiple reasons (she was working with her husband who already had his Oscar and it was the one BEST PICTURE nominee that was actually FUN TO WATCH, plus she is evenly distributed throughout the film)- but I can see how UMEKI won, and it was- I think- more due to the fact that BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI was a sure thing for BEST PICTURE and the ACADEMY, even in 1957, felt obliged to counter this choice with their standard PERFORMATIVE WOKENESS by giving UMEKI an OSCAR and then NEVER OFFERING HER A SUBSTANTIVE ROLE AGAIN.

When they did the OSCARS FAMILY ALBUM thing on the 75th(?) anniversary in 1998(?) where they asked every former winner to appear in the segment, i read UMEKI never even responded to her invite.

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16 hours ago, kingrat said:

I had always avoided Quality Stree...This is one of the few George Stevens movies that isn't too long; his comedies usually drag out their resolutions until I just want the film to be over.

god yes.

I have tried and failed on multiple occasions to make it all the way through THE MORE THE MERRIER and THE TALK OF THE THE TOWN.

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