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28 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

 

Great write-up, Midwestan...

I am not sure if they are showing THE SON-DAUGHTER (1932?) with HELEN HAYES and a surprisingly good RAMON NOVARRO- maybe not since two of the stars are doing "yellow-face"- but, in spite of HAYES'S lousy performance, IT'S INTERESTING and the ENDING IS CRAZY!!!

I have never seen SAYONARA because I do not like BRANDO and I am allowed to not like BRANDO.

the nominees for BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN 1957 WERE:

ELSA LANCHESTER for WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION/ HOPE LANGE in PEYTON PLACE/ DIANE VARSI in PEYTON PLACE/ MIYOSKI UMEKI in SAYONARA/ CAROLYN JONES in THE BACHELOR PARTY

All five of these women had their careers stall in the next decade (although JONES found success on TV) and none were nominated again. I think ELSA LANCHESTER was the favorite for multiple reasons (she was working with her husband who already had his Oscar and it was the one BEST PICTURE nominee that was actually FUN TO WATCH, plus she is evenly distributed throughout the film)- but I can see how UMEKI won, and it was- I think- more due to the fact that BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI was a sure thing for BEST PICTURE and the ACADEMY, even in 1957, felt obliged to counter this choice with their standard PERFORMATIVE WOKENESS by giving UMEKI an OSCAR and then NEVER OFFERING HER A SUBSTANTIVE ROLE AGAIN.

When they did the OSCARS FAMILY ALBUM thing on the 75th(?) anniversary in 1998(?) where they asked every former winner to appear in the segment, i read UMEKI never even responded to her invite.

Thanks LHF.  As I mentioned, I had seen the performances of 4 of the 5 nominees from 1957's Best Supporting Actress category.  I think Lange and Varsi probably had their votes cancelled out, which has been known to happen to men and women from the same picture who were up for the same award..  I think Dave Karger pointed out after the viewing of 'Sayonara' that Umeki's mental health suffered and deteriorated as she aged, and there was a rumor/report that before she died, she had destroyed her Oscar statuette (or discarded it).

Also, if anyone knows the answer to this, when Academy Award nominees are announced, how is voting conducted?  Do people vote after the nominees are known, or is it done beforehand with just the top people/films listed as nominees and the results are kept secret until the ceremony is held?  If voting is held after the nomination process, how long do voters have to get their ballots in, and how are nominations decided in the first place?

31 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

god yes.

I have tried and failed on multiple occasions to make it all the way through THE MORE THE MERRIER and THE TALK OF THE THE TOWN.

I like both these movies, but 'The More The Merrier' is more of a favorite to me.  I always get a kick out of the interaction between Charles Coburn and Joel McCrea when they're on the roof of their building trying to catch some rays with other Washingtonians.  They're first going through dialogue of a comic strip in the newspaper, then when Jean Arthur catches Coburn reading her impressions of McCrea's character from her diary, the reaction of being caught red-handed is a pretty funny scene.

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37 minutes ago, midwestan said:

1. Thanks LHF.  As I mentioned, I had seen the performances of 4 of the 5 nominees from 1957's Best Supporting Actress category.  I think Lange and Varsi probably had their votes cancelled out, which has been known to happen to men and women from the same picture who were up for the same award..  I think Dave Karger pointed out after the viewing of 'Sayonara' that Umeki's mental health suffered and deteriorated as she aged, and there was a rumor/report that before she died, she had destroyed her Oscar statuette (or discarded it).

2. Also, if anyone knows the answer to this, when Academy Award nominees are announced, how is voting conducted?  Do people vote after the nominees are known, or is it done beforehand with just the top people/films listed as nominees and the results are kept secret until the ceremony is held?  If voting is held after the nomination process, how long do voters have to get their ballots in, and how are nominations decided in the first place?

3. I like both these movies, but 'The More The Merrier' is more of a favorite to me.

1. DELISH! I maybe should not cite this, but I read on a gossip site that sometimes posts surprisingly specific details about OLD HOLLYWOOD that BRANDO ruined her career; I don't usually post gossipy stuff, but again- I DO NOT LIKE MARLON BRANDO as an actor or as a person.

2. they vote to select the nominees, the nominees are announced and then they vote from the list of nominees. there used to be a DAILY VARIETY poll published before every OSCAR CEREMONY that acted as a real spoiler as it was right 95% of the time.

3. one of the reasons I am so frustrated with THE MORE THE MERRIER is that it is CLEARLY a film that genuinely appeals to many people, many of whom I share tastes with, but wow- I DO NOT LIKE IT AT ALL!

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really, you could direct a whole comedic short film about it- the irony in the end being that- try as she might- she cannot manage to destroy the statuette, but in the process wrecks the plumbing and electrical for the whole apartment building in Tokyo.

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

god yes.

I have tried and failed on multiple occasions to make it all the way through THE MORE THE MERRIER and THE TALK OF THE THE TOWN.

Just when you think Stevens is wrapping up each of those films, he drags them out for ten or fifteen more minutes, by which point I no longer care 1) if the adorable couple of Jean Arthur and Joel McCrea gets together or 2) whether Jean Arthur picks Cary Grant or Ronald Colman.  It's not surprising that Stevens' films get longer and longer after WWII; the seeds are already there in his comedies.  Although I have seen all of Shane, Giant, and A Place in the Sun, I've never made it all the way through I Remember Mama, trying again when it was recently on TCM. Must start in the middle sometime.

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3 minutes ago, kingrat said:

Just when you think Stevens is wrapping up each of those films, he drags them out for ten or fifteen more minutes, by which point I no longer care 1) if the adorable couple of Jean Arthur and Joel McCrea gets together or 2) whether Jean Arthur picks Cary Grant or Ronald Colman.  It's not surprising that Stevens' films get longer and longer after WWII; the seeds are already there in his comedies.  Although I have seen all of Shane, Giant, and A Place in the Sun, I've never made it all the way through I Remember Mama, trying again when it was recently on TCM. Must start in the middle sometime.

SHANE and GUNGA DIN are two, more or less, perfect films...but I am unsatisfied or frustrated by most of his other works, although I can make it through I REMEMBER MAMA.

I really do not like A PLACE IN THE SUN at all, especially since I read RAYMOND CHANDLER'S take on the film and he gave voice to a lot of my issues quite well.

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5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

SHANE and GUNGA DIN are two, more or less, perfect films...but I am unsatisfied or frustrated by most of his other works, although I can make it through I REMEMBER MAMA.

I really do not like A PLACE IN THE SUN at all, especially since I read RAYMOND CHANDLER'S take on the film and he gave voice to a lot of my issues quite well.

I'm a big fan of Gunga Din but there are some very campy moments in the film involving Cary Grant.    For me these 'work'  (because of Grant) but they do push the envelope and I could see how someone might view them as distractions (but not in a good way) from the adventure story line and tension related to the violence \ killing scenes central to the plot.

 

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I think I Remember Mama is one of George Stevens' finest films, and underrated as his films go.  There is a beautiful mood captured in the story telling, and many nice touches, such as the way the wind blows on Ellen Corby's feathered scarf, when she is on the porch with Irene Dunne at the start of the film. I think Stevens' experience as a cinematographer enhanced his abilities as a director. I Remember Mama also features a fine score by Roy Webb, who was nominated for seven Oscars but never achieved the fame of some of his contemporaries.

 

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49 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

I'm a big fan of Gunga Din but there are some very campy moments in the film,  involving Cary Grant.    For me these 'work'  (because of Grant) but they do push the envelope and I could see how someone might view them as distractions (but not in a good way) from the adventure story line and tension related to the violence \ killing scenes central to the plot.

 

I love CARY very much in this film, even his curls!

More problematic prima facie is (Jewish?) actor SAM JAFFE in brownface as the titular character- although it is a great performance; and with Sabu it would have been a different film.

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Just finished AFFAIR IN TRINIDAD.  It was made six years after GILDA parring Glenn Ford and Rita Hayworth again . I actually thought it was just a good as GILDA with a better story line. It was made by Columbia as was GILDA.  Am I correct that TCM has a difficult time getting access to films from some studios? I assume Columbia is one of them because I don't remember either of these film being on Noir Alley. Anyway AIT was great and I really enjoyed it.

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On 5/20/2020 at 2:24 AM, hamradio said:

"Aquaman" (2019), the plot to too outlandish and bizarre.

Definitely another fish story. :wacko:

 

One think I was a bit baffled by (and no I didn't see most of the film) was the decision to use Julie Andrews' voice in one scene but to partially disguise it.... That is a voice that does not deserve to be disguised.......

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   On 5/21/2020 at 4:07 PM,  kingrat said: 

I had always avoided Quality Stree...This is one of the few George Stevens movies that isn't too long; his comedies usually drag out their resolutions until I just want the film to be over.

22 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I have tried and failed on multiple occasions to make it all the way through THE MORE THE MERRIER and THE TALK OF THE THE TOWN.

Ah-HA! So George Stevens is the common factor with these movies....I've never enjoyed any of those comedies. Thanks for pointing this out, kingrat.

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Scotland Yard Investigator (1945)

Fun, unpretentious "B" from Republic, a light hearted crime thriller featuring C. Aubrey Smith (top billed!) as the head of the National Art Museum in London with the responsibility of housing countless art treasures during the war. Now at the end of the war, he is relieved that representatives from the Louvre will be arriving to pick up the Mona Lisa, not aware of the fact they are actually thieves, hired by a fanatical German art collector.

One of the gratifying things about an engaging little production of this kind, with its relatively brief screen time (68 minutes) and aimably fast pace, is the sight of so many character actors in lead roles, all delivering solidly enjoyable turns. C. Aubrey Smith is actually, despite his senior years, quite frisky and even a bit lovable in his role, even if his character is a bit naive and easy to fool. Smith brings integrity to the part and, of course, British stability and even gets to play a family man here.

Speaking of which, no one who ever saw Eva Moore's unforgettable turn as eccentric God fearing Rebecca Femm in The Old Dark House would recognize her in this film as Smith's cheerful, elegant wife. I rubbed my eyes in disbelief after seeing the film to read that that lovely high society lady in a wheelchair had been played by the same actress.

Erich Von Stroheim (in a curly haired wig!) has fun in the role of Hoffmeyer, the art collector who will stop at nothing, including murder, to steal art treasures for his private collection. Hoffmeyer carries a sword stick, a hollow cane housing that weapon and he's not afraid to use it on anyone who gets in his way. And, one of the additional real delights of this film is the sight of familiar British character actor Forrester Harvey. Harvey has one of the bigger roles of his career in this film as a sly art thief with a disarming comical manner. Harvey is immensely entertaining, his performance actually matching those of Smith and von Stroheim.

The film's title is a bit of a mystery inasmuch as the Scotland Yard investigator in the film is actually a rather minor (as well as colourless) character.

aaawatch4.jpg

2.5 out of 4

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2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:
   On 5/21/2020 at 4:07 PM,  kingrat said: 

I had always avoided Quality Stree...This is one of the few George Stevens movies that isn't too long; his comedies usually drag out their resolutions until I just want the film to be over.

Ah-HA! So George Stevens is the common factor with these movies....I've never enjoyed any of those comedies. Thanks for pointing this out, kingrat.

well, there is also JEAN ARTHUR, an actress whom I have been informed is "A Treasure" but who annoys the **** out of me in almost everything I have ever seen her in.

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52 minutes ago, TomJH said:

Speaking of which, no one who ever saw Eva Moore's unforgettable turn as eccentric God fearing Rebecca Femm in The Old Dark House would recognize her in this film as Smith's cheerful, elegant wife. I rubbed my eyes in disbelief after seeing the film to read that that lovely high society lady in a wheelchair had been played by the same actress.

Eva Moore's performance in The Old Dark House is one of the all-time memorable performances! Ms. Moore had a rich career on the late Victorian/early Edwardian stage, before making films. Her daughter was Jill Esmond, the first wife of Laurence Olivier.

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4 hours ago, Swithin said:

Eva Moore's performance in The Old Dark House is one of the all-time memorable performances! Ms. Moore had a rich career on the late Victorian/early Edwardian stage, before making films. Her daughter was Jill Esmond, the first wife of Laurence Olivier.

MV5BMDY3YWExYWItODc0Mi00NjFlLWE5MTEtNzA5

 

old-dark-house-the-1932-005-ernest-thesi

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well...

even though they have not uploaded anything new in days, MOVIELAND still continues to be INTERESTING- I started watching THE COMPANY OF WOLVES (1984)- an (I think) Irish film...at least it was directed by NEIL JORDAN and had STEPHEN REA in an early role and I was surprised that he was cute!

I almost did not make it out of the opening credits because they are SO CHEAP AND ASTOUNDINGLY SH!TTY!!!!

LIKE, THEY MUST HAVE SPENT ALL THE MONEY AND HAD NOTHING LEFT AND SOMEONE'S KID DID THE CREDITS FOR FREE- THEY EVEN USE ALL CAPS IN AN ITALIC, SERIF-HEAVY FONT WHICH I HATE. Like, it was some LIFETIME movie with TINA YOTHERS level effort.

They gave NO HINT WHATSOEVER to the SUPERB costuming and sets and make-up and F/X to follow, which included THIS SCENE:

Company-of-Wolves.jpg

and this:

companyow1.png

and this

companyofw11.png

ANTON FURST who did FULL METAL JACKET and won an OSCAR for BATMAN (1989) before commiting suicide soon after- did the sets for this AND YES THAT IS ANGELA LANSBURY as GRANDMAMA, this was RIGHT AROUND THE TIME she did the pilot and first season of MURDER, SHE WROTE.

It is a salute to HAMMER HORROR, a revisionist RED RIDING HOOD with a hint of JEANETTE WINTERSON and a touch of the classic british horror anthologies of the 70's...

Some might think it hates men, I just think it's honest.

I realize I am maybe setting myself up for ridicule here, but OH MY GOD, THE WOLF IS HOT

hqdefault.jpg

IT'S VERY VIOLENT and the make-up effects are AMAZING, like- just seeing this by chance and hot on the patent-leather-heels of FROM BEYOND  has been something.

I would watch this again. it is as good a werewolf film as I have ever seen, although the werewolf genre is not exactly teeming that titles that have held up well with time (ie THE HOWLING II: YOUR SISTER IS A WEREWOLF]

TERENCE STAMP HAS A CAMEO AS THE DEVIL!

the acting is great- The young female lead had real star quality and LANSBURY is- no surprise- AMAZING.

 


she does die in the movie, but in a VERY EFFECTIVE METAPHOR, she smashes like a porcelain doll...i think they maybe used a coconut...it's tastefully done though.

 

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

ANTON FURST who did FULL METAL JACKET and won an OSCAR for BATMAN (1989) before commiting suicide soon after- did the sets for this AND YES THAT IS ANGELA LANSBURY as GRANDMAMA, this was RIGHT AROUND THE TIME she did the pilot and first season of MURDER, SHE WROTE.

It is a salute to HAMMER HORROR, a revisionist RED RIDING HOOD with a hint of JEANETTE WINTERSON and a touch of the classic british horror anthologies of the 70's...

Some might think it hates men, I just think it's honest.

It was based on a psychological-symbolist story by Angela Carter, who delves into the feminist writings.  Neil Jordan tried to capture the "Psychological" aspect by shooting the entire movie as a Freudian "dream"--Roger Ebert claimed it "perfectly captures the style of a nightmare onscreen"--and boy, did he capture the style.  😱  

The plotless, episodic stream-of-consciousness flow of the scenes, the just-slightly-artificial wooded sets, the twilit lighting and the slightly "off" music that turns disturbing just before something scary's about to happen, and a general sense of unexplained hysteria to the acting...It's not a great werewolf film when put next to John Landis (or Sybil Danning), but it's alongside David Lynch's Eraserhead and Orson Welles' The Trial as one of the three great I've-had-ones-like-that examples of "REM-state filmmaking".  THIS was the movie that got me to watch more Neil Jordan.

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1 hour ago, EricJ said:

It was based on a psychological-symbolist story by Angela Carter, who delves into the feminist writings.  Neil Jordan tried to capture the "Psychological" aspect by shooting the entire movie as a Freudian "dream"--Roger Ebert claimed it "perfectly captures the style of a nightmare onscreen"--and boy, did he capture the style.  😱  

The plotless, episodic stream-of-consciousness flow of the scenes, the just-slightly-artificial wooded sets, the twilit lighting and the slightly "off" music that turns disturbing just before something scary's about to happen, and a general sense of unexplained hysteria to the acting...It's not a great werewolf film when put next to John Landis (or Sybil Danning), but it's alongside David Lynch's Eraserhead and Orson Welles' The Trial as one of the three great I've-had-ones-like-that examples of "REM-state filmmaking".  THIS was the movie that got me to watch more Neil Jordan.

Funny you mention LANDIS...

I watched AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON also on movieland last week . I did not post a review because when it comes to John Landis, my feelings are and will always be tempered by the incident on THE TWILIGHT ZONE MOVIE...And I felt a sense of unease during the finale of the movie with numerous Picadilly Square(?) pedestrians torn to bits and randomly thrown out of windows and crushed almost fetishistically by buses. Some thing about it reeked of being made by someone who has a real contempt for human life. (No matter what the jury said)

whereas I would say IN THE COMPANY OF WOLVES was not entirely without heart or affection for (most of the)humans...I mean, at least I wasn’t rooting for the wolf. (And if anybody was going to root for the wolf in the audience, it would probably be me.)

I was also watching THE WOLF MAN the other night and I’ve always loved Evelyn Ankers’ line “LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD was a werewolf story...”

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11 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I watched AN AMERICAN WEREWOLF IN LONDON also on movieland last week . I did not post a review because when it comes to John Landis, my feelings are and will always be tempered by the incident on THE TWILIGHT ZONE MOVIE...And I felt a reasonable sense of unease during the finale of the movie with numerous pedestrians torn to bits and randomly thrown out of windows and crushed almost fetishistically by buses. Some thing about it reeked of being made by someone who has a real contempt for human life.

Landis started out as a stuntman in his early days before "Shlock"--He even cameos in AAWIL as one of the Londoners sent crashing through a window.

(My complaint with the TZ incident is that Landis seems to have soured on directing after that:  Apart from the Eddie Murphys, his work after '83 seemed lazy, contemptuous, self-indulgently idiosyncratic and with just a bored oddness to it--"The Stupids" is practically a work of brilliance compared to "Innocent Blood" or "Into the Night"--and even his most enthusiastic film-historian interviews on cult-movie documentaries has a faint hint of snark to it.)

6 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

You are right though, I was wrong to speak ill of THE HOWLING II: YOUR SISTER IS A WEREWOLF. 

It's not a good film (hoo-boy) but of Philippe Mora's two would-be Howling "sequels", you literally just can't take your eyes off of it as the work of a deranged schizophrenic lunatic.   And not even in the good way.

Howling III: the Marsupials was his more deliberate Australian attempt at Ozploitation "camp" tongue-in-cheek, and.......oy.  Australian for "subtle", mate.

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8 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Also I found LANDIS’s story in THE TWILIGHT ZONE movie to be really conventional and unexciting- very clearly Backlot shot too. 

Although I defend the Landis TZ segment as the only part of the movie that almost obligatorily managed to capture the original gritty, jittery, speech-moralizing tone of the original Rod Serling episodes, for those who'd never seen them (the first job of a TV-adaptation movie)--and Morrow could have aced a real Serling script--while Spielberg, Dante and Miller were...just doing themselves.  If I see a TZ movie, I want Rod Serling, not the Amazing Stories version of "Kick the Can".

Vic's story had to be shuffled around into incoherence out of the existing footage they had, but Landis still proved he was the loyal student of cult classics.

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