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speedracer5

I Just Watched...

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On 5/21/2020 at 4:07 PM, kingrat said:

I had always avoided Quality Street, since it's often cited as one of the films that made Katharine Hepburn "box-office poison," but watched it yesterday and quite liked it. Granted, it's an artificial comedy by J. M. Barrie that will not be to everyone's taste. Quality Street is a neighborhood with more than its share of old maids with not much to do but observe and comment on everything that goes on. This is especially true of Estelle Winwood, Helena Grant, and Florence Lake, a formidable trio. It's 1805, and Phoebe (Katharine Hepburn) believes she's about to receive a proposal of marriage from Dr. Brown (Franchot Tone). Instead, he announces he's off to fight in the war against Napoleon.

Ten years later, Phoebe feels like she's lost her looks and is turning into an old maid. Dr. Brown doesn't even recognize her at first, so she pretends to be her niece Livvie, a flirtatious little minx. Will Dr. Brown prefer Phoebe or Livvie, and will the local gossips confirm their suspicions that there is no such person as Livvie? Some serious matters arise during all the artifice: does a woman have to be young and silly, or at least pretend to be, if she wants a husband? How do unmarried women live out their lives in this society? The war, of course, is taking away potential husbands; this was a problem in Britain in the aftermath of WWI when so many men were killed.

Thus must be Eric Blore's manliest role, as he plays a recruiting sergeant who is rather taken by Patty (Cora Witherspoon), the domestic servant of Phoebe and her older sister Susan (Fay Bainter). Lots of mugging by Blore, Cora Witherspoon, and Estelle Winwood, and Fay Bainter provides some touching moments as she shows her younger sister the wedding dress she was never able to use. This is one of the few George Stevens movies that isn't too long; his comedies usually drag out their resolutions until I just want the film to be over.

I enjoyed this movie more than I expected.  I think it would be more popular now than when it was released, considering the success of films like Emma and other Jane Austen adaptations.  Although Quality Street is not Jane Austen, it's of that period and has many of the themes of her books.  In some ways, it's more "Jane Austen" than the recent PBS series Sanditon.  Quality Street is a similar story to Austen's Persuasion about the romance of a more mature couple who are reunited.  Fay Bainter and Eric Blore were delightful.

 

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11 hours ago, rosebette said:

I enjoyed this movie more than I expected.  I think it would be more popular now than when it was released, considering the success of films like Emma and other Jane Austen adaptations.  Although Quality Street is not Jane Austen, it's of that period and has many of the themes of her books.  In some ways, it's more "Jane Austen" than the recent PBS series Sanditon.  Quality Street is a similar story to Austen's Persuasion about the romance of a more mature couple who are reunited.  Fay Bainter and Eric Blore were delightful.

 

I'm intrigued now.

I am of the opinion that PERSUASION is the finest thing AUSTEN wrote.

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18 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

well...

even though they have not uploaded anything new in days, MOVIELAND still continues to be INTERESTING- I started watching THE COMPANY OF WOLVES (1984)....

 

quoting myself to point out the UNCANNY COINCIDENCE THAT THIS SONG STARTED PLAYING ON THE RADIO AFTER DISCUSSING THIS FILM YESTERDAY:

(Posting this version because the video is interesting)

 

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"The Pacific War in Color" on the Smithsonian Channel.  Much of the 5 hour documentary used camera footage never seen before  some very sharp and crisp that took years off it.  Learned something new about the development of landing craft,  issues which plauge the B-29, tactics, etc.  Perfect for the Memorial Day weekend.

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6 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I'm intrigued now.

I am of the opinion that PERSUASION is the finest thing AUSTEN wrote.

Persuasion doesn't have the plot of the main character pretending to be a younger "cousin,"  which Quality Street has.  I also found Quality Street a bit of a "feminist" film;  Phoebe/Livvie play on the Franchot Tone character's (and society's) dismissal of women of a certain age.  

 

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On 5/23/2020 at 2:47 PM, LornaHansonForbes said:

 THE COMPANY OF WOLVES (1984)- an (I think) Irish film...at least it was directed by NEIL JORDAN

 

It was backed by the English, but yes indeed Neil Jordan is Irish. His has been an unpredictable career ranging from this, to the London grime of Mona Lisa, to the many switches in The Crying Game, through biopic territory in Michael Collins, and through moody Graham Greene territory in The End of the Affair. I saw his most recent film this past week, the 2018 thriller Greta. That's really something. It's like someone took one of the "yuppie nightmare" films of the late 80s/early 90s (Single White Female, Pacific Heights, etc.) and combined it with the Psycho-biddy genre of the 60s (Baby Jane, Hush Hush Sweet Charlotte, etc.)  More than a bit predictable, but as a thriller it worked because it wasn't afraid to send itself up, leaning over frequently to full camp territory. France's Isabelle Huppert was the psycho, and she played it to the over-the-top hilt. 

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The Wings of Eagles (1957).

John Wayne plays John Wayne.  Well, technically, he's playing Frank "Spig" Wead, who in the interwar period tried to get the Navy to adopt the aircraft carrier, before an accident left him partially paralyzed and forced him to change jobs, becoming a Hollywood screenwriter (the movie was produced by MGM, and includes footage of Wallace Beery and Clark Gable in Hell Divers, conveniently also an MGM movie).  Then World War II comes and Spig has a chance to redeem himself.

The movie has John Wayne being John Wayne, which is a problem, but worse, it sees him directed again by John Ford.  Spig Wead seems like a really interesting character, but not one whose story should have been brought to the screen by John Wayne and John Ford, who think the most important things to do are show drunken antics and have barroom brawls with the Army.

5/10.

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Marines, Let's Go (1961).

If you thought The Wings of Eagles was a misfire, Marines, Let's Go is unimaginably worse.  Tom Tryon, David Hedison, and Tom Reese play stock-character Marines in Korea who get leave in Japan, where they proceed to act like such complete jerks that they nearly get themselves court-martialed, saved only by all leave being cancelled so they can partake in a tacked-on 20-minute combat sequence.  I didn't mention the stock naïve Texan, or the bad cultural stereotypes about Japanese and Koreans that make Ricardo Montalban in Sayonara like like a true Asian-American.  These marines didn't just deserve to be court-martialed, they deserved to have their necks broken by the sumo wrestler character.

2/10, with the second point being for the color shots of nighttime Japan.  It's on FXM tomorrow and again Tuesday if you want to see for yourself how bad it is.

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2 hours ago, Fedya said:

The Wings of Eagles (1957).

John Wayne plays John Wayne.  Well, technically, he's playing Frank "Spig" Wead, who in the interwar period tried to get the Navy to adopt the aircraft carrier, before an accident left him partially paralyzed and forced him to change jobs, becoming a Hollywood screenwriter (the movie was produced by MGM, and includes footage of Wallace Beery and Clark Gable in Hell Divers, conveniently also an MGM movie).  Then World War II comes and Spig has a chance to redeem himself.

The movie has John Wayne being John Wayne, which is a problem, but worse, it sees him directed again by John Ford.  Spig Wead seems like a really interesting character, but not one whose story should have been brought to the screen by John Wayne and John Ford, who think the most important things to do are show drunken antics and have barroom brawls with the Army.

5/10.

"Gonna move that toe!"

With dialogue like that, this is a film that shouldn't be missed by anyone with a passion for feet.

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Not to get off track here, but I'll take this moment to give a shout-out to Speedracer5, who created this thread just over 5 years ago (anniversary was actually May 22).  Here we are 5 years and 937 pages after her first post, and this thread is still going strong!  😀👏💪

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A couple days ago I watched Red Heat with Arnold Schwarzenegger (I had to look him up to spell his name right) and Jim Belushi. It's an okay buddy/cop movie. Arnold makes a good Russian tough guy and Belushi is the American big mouth.

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Basically, Arnold is after the Russian drug dealer who killed his partner. And later he also kills Belushi's partner. What is it with cop movies and partner killing anyway? Naturally they have to join forces. If you're in the mood for an action movie, then this is one to watch.

The only problem I had was Belushi's incessant dirty remarks. I get that it's a cop movie and there is a standard to maintain, I guess. But there are way to many **** and sex jokes. 🙄

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17 hours ago, Rudy's Girl said:

A couple days ago I watched Red Heat with Arnold Schwarzenegger (I had to look him up to spell his name right) and Jim Belushi. It's an okay buddy/cop movie. Arnold makes a good Russian tough guy and Belushi is the American big mouth.

 I saw it when first released, It was an OK action/comedy by Walter Hill, who did the greatest action/comedy movie ever IMO which is 48 Hrs, with the dynamic team of Nick Nolte and Eddie Murphy. 

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I just watched American Graffiti. I had forgotten all the future stars that appeared in this flick.  Also, it was one of George Lucas's first efforts.  I didn't remember much from when I first saw it back in the 70s, but it was very entertaining. The music was great too. Having Wolfman Jack was a nice touch. It sent me to Google to see how old all these actors are now.  It's hard to imagine Candy Clark  and Richard Dreyfuss are both 72  and Ron Howard is 66. What surprised me even more is that Harrison Ford is 77. 

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I watched The Comancheros last night on TCM and enjoyed it quite a bit. Beautiful on-location scenery in Utah and Arizona, an Elmer Bernstein score, a decent script, and an above-average cast. John Wayne plays the kind of part he does well, Stuart Whitman makes a good foil to Wayne, and Lee Marvin is great in a small role as a half-scalped gunrunner. There's also Nehemiah Persoff as the leader of the bad guys, Edgar Buchanan as a judge, Michael Ansara as Persoff's second-in-command, and the lovely Ina Balin as Stuart Whitman's love interest. Ina Balin's performances here and in From the Terrace make me wish she had had a bigger career. By the way, this was Michael Curtiz' last film, and John Wayne had to direct some of the scenes because of Curtiz' illness.

Although the brief scenes of torture shown in The Comancheros are nothing compared to what will be shown a few years later in The Wild Bunch and Ulzana's Raid, they are stronger than one might expect for 1961.

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14 minutes ago, kingrat said:

I watched The Comancheros last night on TCM and enjoyed it quite a bit. Beautiful on-location scenery in Utah and Arizona, an Elmer Bernstein score, a decent script, and an above-average cast. John Wayne plays the kind of part he does well, Stuart Whitman makes a good foil to Wayne, and Lee Marvin is great in a small role as a half-scalped gunrunner. There's also Nehemiah Persoff as the leader of the bad guys, Edgar Buchanan as a judge, Michael Ansara as Persoff's second-in-command, and the lovely Ina Balin as Stuart Whitman's love interest. Ina Balin's performances here and in From the Terrace make me wish she had had a bigger career. By the way, this was Michael Curtiz' last film, and John Wayne had to direct some of the scenes because of Curtiz' illness.

Although the brief scenes of torture shown in The Comancheros are nothing compared to what will be shown a few years later in The Wild Bunch and Ulzana's Raid, they are stronger than one might expect for 1961.

With regards to Ina Balin;   We were watching The Dick Van Dyke Show on Decades,  and she was the guest star as a artist and instructor (who falls for Dick).

I asked my wife if she knew her since I assume she might be Italian.   Nope,  here is what Wiki says: Balin was born in Brooklyn, New York to Jewish parents. 

Anyhow,  the next night what do we see;  There is Balin telling Wayne she knew he was a spy!   Yea,  another actress that didn't have much of a film career but was fine in the few films she was  in during the 60s and  some limited T.V. work.

Ina Balin 1960.jpg

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Currently running around the land of the year 2005... I had started a retrospective of my 20 favorite films of each year (3 years a day for a month) on another website, starting in the present and going back (because most of the thinner years are up front in the present and I wanted to work back to the periods I was most confident in). Well, 2005 was super thin and embarassing so I'm in a rush to fill it out with better films by the time its due on Sunday.

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25 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

I had started a retrospective of my 20 favorite films of each year (3 years a day for a month) on another website, starting in the present and going back

Sounds grueling, not fun. I always marvel at the TCM posters here who follow guidelines for movie watching. Sometimes I get in a groove, like seeing a bunch of Anna Magnani or Elia Kazan movies. But most often driven by mood like Kathy Najimy's character in THE FISHER KING:

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"I want a Katherine Hepburn-y, Ethel Merman-y kind of movie, something that will make me laugh. I gotta laugh tonight"

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6 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Sounds grueling, not fun. I always marvel at the TCM posters here who follow guidelines for movie watching. Sometimes I get in a groove, like seeing a bunch of Anna Magnani or Elia Kazan movies. But most often driven by mood like Kathy Najimy's character in THE FISHER KING:

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"I want a Katherine Hepburn-y, Ethel Merman-y kind of movie, something that will make me laugh. I gotta laugh tonight"

Usually I'm like you in that I whiz about from film to film by my general mood with no particular guidelines in place, and usually 2005 is one of the last years I would go about investigating, it is true. The plus of this experiment though is that most other years are shored up nicely enough to make good lists, and even if 2005 isn't my favorite year, it did get some titles off my to see list that were on there for a long time: The New World, Memoirs of a Geisha, Proof, and The White Countess. {By the way, I love The Fisher King. Moved me tremendously when I saw it}

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23 minutes ago, TikiSoo said:

Sounds grueling, not fun. I always marvel at the TCM posters here who follow guidelines for movie watching. Sometimes I get in a groove, like seeing a bunch of Anna Magnani or Elia Kazan movies. But most often driven by mood like Kathy Najimy's character in THE FISHER KING:

"I want a Katherine Hepburn-y, Ethel Merman-y kind of movie, something that will make me laugh. I gotta laugh tonight"

If Terry Gilliam has ever non-ironically SEEN a Katherine Hepburn-y, Ethel Merman-y movie in his life, it's more than I expect from him.

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The Macamober Affair (1947) a Film Soleil Noir one of those sun baked, desert or tropical based Noirs. 7/10

The Macomber Affair Poster

This one leaves it up in the air at the end as to the outcome.  Joan Bennett and her husband Robert Preston  are on safari with guide Gregory Peck  in Nairobi.  They are in a sort of estranged relationship. Hints of some type of  infidelity are implied.  Preston hopes the trip will revitalize their marriage.  Instead of regaining his manhood  he displays his weenie-ness when he throws away his rifle and runs  when the lion he wounded charges out of the brush. Back at the camp, Preston takes out his humiliation on the native crew. Its bad form, very bad form.   All that is witnessed by Bennett who is turned on to Peck. 

Eventually Preston shows hes got a pair and is able to shoot an antelope, he also is ready to give Bennett he walking papers. Bennett realizes shes gonna loose her sugar daddy.   Preston next shoots a couple of buffalo. One is only wounded and the same scenario with the lion plays out. They have to go in to dispatch it. When the buffalo rears up and charges  both Preston and Peck shoot at it along with Bennett but instead of hitting the buffalo she shoots Preston in the back of the head.  Was it an accident or deliberate.?  Peck fills out a report that it was an accident, but questions Bennett who admits that in her heart she wanted to kill him. The film ends with her walking to the coroners inquiry.

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I love THE MACAMOBER AFFAIR . . . whatever it is.  Preston Foster would be surprised to know he's in it!  :P

I've seen THE MACOMBER AFFAIR twice.  Most enjoyable.  I like the fact the ending was 'up in the air'. 

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On 5/25/2020 at 5:50 AM, midwestan said:

Not to get off track here, but I'll take this moment to give a shout-out to Speedracer5, who created this thread just over 5 years ago (anniversary was actually May 22).  Here we are 5 years and 937 pages after her first post, and this thread is still going strong!  😀👏💪

Thank you to all who keep watching things and contributing. And a bigger thank you goes to those who discuss what is being watched. 
 

And, I think we can all appreciate that this thread has maintained civility. Especially when I’m about to reply to a post with the controversial opinion that I like Jean Arthur. 
 

To quote Lucy Ricardo: “Happy Birthday and I hope you (the I Just Watched... thread) live another 75 years!”  

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On 5/22/2020 at 5:40 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

god yes.

I have tried and failed on multiple occasions to make it all the way through THE MORE THE MERRIER and THE TALK OF THE THE TOWN.

I love both those movies you mention—especially “The More the Merrier.” 

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On 5/23/2020 at 7:08 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

well, there is also JEAN ARTHUR, an actress whom I have been informed is "A Treasure" but who annoys the **** out of me in almost everything I have ever seen her in.

While I don’t know if I’d go with “treasure” (that is a term I’d give to my girl, Hattie McDaniel), but I love Jean Arthur. 

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