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16 hours ago, rosebette said:

I think Uncertain Glory is an unrecognized gem.  It was panned when it was released because it's not a typical Flynn vehicle, but holds up well compared with some of the now-cartoonish WWII films, such as Desperate Journey.  Flynn gives a nuanced and understated performance, and Paul Lukas is always worth watching.  I felt that the young female lead was not especially credible.

I really enjoy Uncertain Glory.  It might be my favorite from the "Errol Flynn Adventures" collection that I have.  Errol Flynn looks gorgeous in it and he portrays an anti-hero hero (if that makes any sense).  I wish that Flynn had had more scenes with Faye Emerson and less with the girl he meets later. 

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10 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I really enjoy Uncertain Glory.  It might be my favorite from the "Errol Flynn Adventures" collection that I have.  Errol Flynn looks gorgeous in it and he portrays an anti-hero hero (if that makes any sense).  I wish that Flynn had had more scenes with Faye Emerson and less with the girl he meets later. 

I always find Faye Emerson, aside from being a hot, sexy lady, during her Warner Bros. years, to be a very interesting actress, often cast by the studio as "hard" types. She could certainly be very glamourous. I wonder if it's because she was so frequently cast in hard boiled parts that the studio didn't think of elevating her to larger, better roles. I agree that her scenes with Flynn in Uncertain Glory have a sparkle, and certainly a sexual edge, that are missing in his scenes with the film's very virginal leading lady, Jean Sullivan. Once again Emerson is giving an interesting interpretation of a tough, conniving role and, once again, the lady makes an early exit from a film. It's a shame.

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I thought that Emerson particularly shone in her role in The Mask of Dimitrios as the proprietor of a seedy joint. She was assisted by interesting photography and makeup making her appear rather tired and older in some scenes. But she also brought a certain mystique to the part that made me think that a director like Von Sternberg might have been able to do wonders with her.

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In any event, Faye Emerson is yet another actress that the Hollywood film factory used infrequently only to spit her out when it no longer had any use for her. The lady never got her due in the industry, though she married well (Elliot Roosevelt, FDR's son, and later band leader Skitch Henderson).

Emerson reached a low point with a suicide attempt in late 1948 but she soon bounced back to have an extensive and profitable career in television, appearing as a guest panellist on numerous shows and even for a short while played the role of late night TV host on The Faye Emerson Show. She was known for her glamourous evening dresses and, according to one source, her dress slipped one evening with Faye, in an era of live TV, having large portions of her abundant form on display coast to coast. Emerson also appeared in a number of Broadway productions during the '50s. She announced her retirement from show business in 1963, spending her final years residing in Switzerland and then Spain. It was in Spain that she succumbed to cancer in 1975.

Here's Faye in a 1961 appearance as a panellist on To Tell the Truth.

 

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I just watched The Woman in Green (1945), a Sherlock Holmes programmer with my favorite Holmes, Basil Rathbone.  Watching this on a Saturday afternoon reminded me of my first encounters as a teenager with this series on Saturday afternoons on a local syndicated station.  I developed a bit of a crush on Rathbone's Holmes, cool and rational and naturally appealing to the nerdy daughter of a high school teacher, kind of an alter-ego to my other crush on Errol Flynn, who appealed to... well, you can fill in that blank.

Anyway, I was surprised at the innate sexiness of Rathbone's Holmes, who observes Hillary Brooke's character as having a good figure and "lustrous eyes," and automatically assumes she's going back to her apartment with the gentleman she's dining with: "Are you naive?" he asks the Inspector, as they observe her at the bar.  The later scenes between Rathbone and Brook indicate more of a man-of-the-world than the Holmes we usually encounter.   And Henry Daniell as Moriarty is worth the price of admission.   Something else that I noticed -- the "sedative" that Brook offers Rathbone to induce a hypnotic state  is identified as a form of canabis, which he rejects.

Anyway, all of this was over and done with in a neat 67 minutes, around the length of the average Masterpiece Theater mystery program.

 

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M 1951

I haven't actually seen the Peter Lorre version, but I do like this one. I think David Wayne was a terrific actor and  he became known to me thru the Alfred Hitchcock Presents episode where he kills his wife, shoves her in the trunk of his car and is stopped by a copper because he has a tail light out.  

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17 hours ago, rosebette said:

I just watched The Woman in Green (1945), a Sherlock Holmes programmer with my favorite Holmes, Basil Rathbone.  Watching this on a Saturday afternoon reminded me of my first encounters as a teenager with this series on Saturday afternoons on a local syndicated station.  I developed a bit of a crush on Rathbone's Holmes, cool and rational and naturally appealing to the nerdy daughter of a high school teacher, kind of an alter-ego to my other crush on Errol Flynn, who appealed to... well, you can fill in that blank.

Anyway, I was surprised at the innate sexiness of Rathbone's Holmes, who observes Hillary Brooke's character as having a good figure and "lustrous eyes," and automatically assumes she's going back to her apartment with the gentleman she's dining with: "Are you naive?" he asks the Inspector, as they observe her at the bar.  The later scenes between Rathbone and Brook indicate more of a man-of-the-world than the Holmes we usually encounter.   And Henry Daniell as Moriarty is worth the price of admission.   Something else that I noticed -- the "sedative" that Brook offers Rathbone to induce a hypnotic state  is identified as a form of canabis, which he rejects.

Anyway, all of this was over and done with in a neat 67 minutes, around the length of the average Masterpiece Theater mystery program.

 

I watched The Woman in Green again last year myself and regard it as one of the more entertaining films in the "B" mystery series. Basil Rathbone ranked Henry Daniell as the best of the three actors to play Moriarty in his Holmes films. While I have a hard time resisting George Zucco's interpretation of the same role in Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, Daniell's superbly underplayed performance is still highly effective. A particular highlight moment of The Woman in Green occurs for me when Hillary Brooke, then at the peak of her icy patrician beauty, sets out to hypnotize Holmes, and we can't be quite certain whether she will succeed or not.

The hypnosis scene, with its calming background music and bowl of gentling swirling "waters of forgetfulness" into which they peer, with Hillary's soothing "Sleep . . . sleep . . .sleep" as Holmes appears to be falling beneath her spell has always been a particular highlight moment for me.

I can even forgive the image of Hillary's hand gently stirring the water in the bowl from the top of the screen, along with part of her face also visible, yet, bafflingly, we simultaneously see her and Rathbone  peering into those same waters from the bottom of the screen without their reflections being upside down, as they should be from that camera angle.  Such is the magic of the movies when you surrender to a scene and suspend any logic that gets in the way of seeing your stars right side up.

7376c611183addb466bd288737957d00--basil-

 

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1 hour ago, rosebette said:

 re: [SHERLOCK HOLMES AND] THE LADY IN GREEN

1. And Henry Daniell as Moriarty is worth the price of admission. 

2.  Something else that I noticed -- the "sedative" that Brook offers Rathbone to induce a hypnotic state  is identified as a form of canabis, which he rejects.

1, HENRY DANIELL is good isn't he? I was just re-re-re-re-watching THE BODY SNATCHER and he's every bit as good as KARLOFF is.

2. (sorry about the quality) but:

 

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I don't usually do this, but I have been watching BLUE VELVET (1986) in spurts over the last three days, and I'm still not done with it- it's good, and not challenging in the sense that everything else LYNCH has done that I have seen has been- IT WAS FILMED IN MY HOME TOWN and HOLY ****, JUST ABOUT EVERY SINGLE LOCATION IT IS SHOT AT IS WITHIN 1,000 FEET OF WHERE I SIT AND WRITE THIS RIGHT NOW (both churches, the apartment building, and the diner. the police precinct is 2 blocks off and i think LAURA DERN'S house is a few blocks down on my same street.

it's eerie as hell and a little bit of a sharp pain for me to see my hometown as i so fondly recall it. (IT'C CHANGED)

and also there is the fact that KYLE MACHLACHLAN (i know I spelled that wrong) just reminds me in so many ways of a couple guys i was in love with once and WOW, HE IS SO ADORABLE IN THIS MOVIE.

I also love IN DREAMS by ROY ORBISON

LAURA DERN has a very film noir sort of "i don't know what" about her....

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1 hour ago, rosebette said:

 

Something else that I noticed -- the "sedative" that Brook offers Rathbone to induce a hypnotic state  is identified as a form of canabis, which he rejects.

 

It is: "Cannabis Japonica".  This is purely fictitious. 'Japonica' basically means a plant native to Japan. I believe that the writers may have wished to give the well-known and somewhat mundane cannabis an air of mystery by implying that this is a strain from the Orient.

It might in some manner be attempting to recall the mixture of opium and cannabis which affluent and sophisticated people of the Far East used as a sleeping aid. The Count of Monte Cristo used such a preparation: "I make no secret of it, it is a mixture of some excellent opium for which I made a special trip to Canton in order to get  the purest quality, and of the best hashish grown in the Orient." It is reported to be significantly powerful while being quite harmless when taken in moderation.

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Last night I watched BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT '56. It stars fave Dana Andrews and not fave Joan Fontaine. It's well acted, beautifully shot and very well edited, making a great introductory film for anyone not familiar with classic film or noir.

It's a story of the controversy of capital punishment. Can someone innocent be convicted on circumstantial evidence? 

Of course as I watched, realized I had seen it numerous times before. I suppose the reason why it's not in my Fritz Lang "collection" is because it somehow rings hollow. The twists & turns are great, as is the tension it builds, but I just can't stand Joan Fontaine's whiney charactor. I did find the portrayal of "loose women" a hoot, though-talk about stereotype!

There's only a few crime noirs that still work once you know the ending, CAPE FEAR, DOA are the best example that comes to mind. I'd chalk BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT up as "great for first viewing, good for second viewing, but once you know the ending, forget it."

th?id=OIP.bJAL_wojwv1FFnVVkVMtiwHaLH&pid

beyond2.JPG

Could she BE any more skeletal? Look at those big hands!

(while annoying, J Fontaine is truly a talented actress...she aced the US accent)

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Just now, TikiSoo said:

Last night I watched BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT '56. It stars fave Dana Andrews and not fave Joan Fontaine. It's well acted, beautifully shot and very well edited, making a great introductory film for anyone not familiar with classic film or noir.

It's a story of the controversy of capital punishment. Can someone innocent be convicted on circumstantial evidence? 

Of course as I watched, realized I had seen it numerous times before. I suppose the reason why it's not in my Fritz Lang "collection" is because it somehow rings hollow. The twists & turns are great, as is the tension it builds, but I just can't stand Joan Fontaine's whiney charactor. I did find the portrayal of "loose women" a hoot, though-talk about stereotype!

There's only a few crime noirs that still work once you know the ending, CAPE FEAR, DOA are the best example that comes to mind. I'd chalk BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT up as "great for first viewing, good for second viewing, but once you know the ending, forget it."

th?id=OIP.bJAL_wojwv1FFnVVkVMtiwHaLH&pid

beyond2.JPG

Could she BE any more skeletal? Look at those big hands!

Andrews and Fontaine are great, but I agree the movie falls way short to be able to fall into classic status.

(SPOILER) At the end of the film, when it turns out that Andrews' character did indeed commit the crime, I kind of saw it coming. But I guess I've been spoiled by too many other movies with a 'surprise' twist.

 

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1 hour ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

Andrews and Fontaine are great, but I agree [BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT] falls way short to be able to fall into classic status.

(SPOILER)

 

It's such a conventional, run-of-the-mill movie until it decides to all of a sudden get interesting at the very, very end.

ps- did you know that this board has a function where if you use [] (brackets) around the word "spoiler', you can actually hide it like this:

 

instead of using parenthesis.

it's really neat!

(don't worry, you warned about the spoiler, and that is what counts!)

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17 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I don't usually do this, but I have been watching BLUE VELVET (1986) in spurts over the last three days, and I'm still not done with it- it's good, and not challenging in the sense that everything else LYNCH has done that I have seen has been- IT WAS FILMED IN MY HOME TOWN and HOLY ****, JUST ABOUT EVERY SINGLE LOCATION IT IS SHOT AT IS WITHIN 1,000 FEET OF WHERE I SIT AND WRITE THIS RIGHT NOW (both churches, the apartment building, and the diner. the police precinct is 2 blocks off and i think LAURA DERN'S house is a few blocks down on my same street.

it's eerie as hell and a little bit of a sharp pain for me to see my hometown as i so fondly recall it. (IT'C CHANGED)

and also there is the fact that KYLE MACHLACHLAN (i know I spelled that wrong) just reminds me in so many ways of a couple guys i was in love with once and WOW, HE IS SO ADORABLE IN THIS MOVIE.

I also love IN DREAMS by ROY ORBISON

LAURA DERN has a very film noir sort of "i don't know what" about her....

I turned this into an uneintentional double feature with ROAD HOUSE (1989)- also on MOVIELAND- I would watch some of one movie, then some of the other- kind of intermixing the two before I even realized that THEY HAVE SOME SIMILARITIES.

Both are honestly brilliant in their own ways- genuine, unforced, thoroughly unapologetic and watchable. iT'S A HIGHLY RECOMMENDED DOUBLE FEATURE.

ALTHOUGH I will take the time to note, because it deserves to be noted, that KELLY LYNCH (no relation to DAVID that I know of) is a really bad actress...According to imdb, she replaced (I *** you not) ANNETTE BENING who was fired for lacking chemistry with SWAYZE- I'm actually not an ANNETTE BENNING fan, but I somehow doubt she could POSSIBLY have had less chemistry with SWAYZE than KELLY LYNCH, who plays her part (which I admit, is not exactly HEDDA GABLER) with all the passion of a CRASH TEST DUMMY.

BLUE VELVET- which I liked very much- surprised me for how- BY COMPARISON WITH DAVID LYNCH'S OTHER FILMS AND SOME OF THE MESSED UP STUFF I HAVE SEEN- conventional it was...it was pretty unambiguous; I would absolutely label it a film noir...

The collective cast- which included HOPE LANGE, DEAN STOCKWELL (who was great)  AND, OF COURSE DENNIS HOPPER- make an impression...although I understand why DENNIS HOPPER was nominated for HOOSIERS and not this (he actually has a pretty small amount of screen time.)

ISABELLA ROSSELINI does a really good rendition of the title song.

JUDGE ME FOR WRITING THIS, but I would let KYLE MACHLACHLAN (sp?) smack me around too.

I was very very surprised by the happy ending. i think that in and of itself was more stunning than the most dark and twisted end that LYNCH could have concocted.

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Truly LORNA....

The only thing I liked in ROAD HOUSE was the exposure to people of this way talented and oft overlooked musician...

Sepiatone

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Designing Woman (1957).

MGM remade Woman of the Year, because they could.  Lucas McCain gets to essay his native Brooklyn accent as a gangster who threatens sportswriter Gregory Peck.  Lauren Bacall is as bland as ever as the fashion designer Peck hastily marries and who flies off the handle because Peck, horror of horrors, might have had a girlfriend before marrying her.

Competently made, but nothing special.  6/10

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3 hours ago, Fedya said:

Designing Woman (1957).

MGM remade Woman of the Year, because they could.  Lauren Bacall is as bland as ever as the fashion designer Peck hastily marries and who flies off the handle because Peck, horror of horrors, might have had a girlfriend before marrying her.

She managed the role a little better in the Broadway musical, though:  

 

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11 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Last night I watched BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT '56. It stars fave Dana Andrews and not fave Joan Fontaine. It's well acted, beautifully shot and very well edited, making a great introductory film for anyone not familiar with classic film or noir.

It's a story of the controversy of capital punishment. Can someone innocent be convicted on circumstantial evidence? 

Of course as I watched, realized I had seen it numerous times before. I suppose the reason why it's not in my Fritz Lang "collection" is because it somehow rings hollow. The twists & turns are great, as is the tension it builds, but I just can't stand Joan Fontaine's whiney charactor. I did find the portrayal of "loose women" a hoot, though-talk about stereotype!

There's only a few crime noirs that still work once you know the ending, CAPE FEAR, DOA are the best example that comes to mind. I'd chalk BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT up as "great for first viewing, good for second viewing, but once you know the ending, forget it."

th?id=OIP.bJAL_wojwv1FFnVVkVMtiwHaLH&pid

beyond2.JPG

Could she BE any more skeletal? Look at those big hands!

(while annoying, J Fontaine is truly a talented actress...she aced the US accent)

Wow, you're right, Tiki. She does have big hands. The camera angle and the dress are both very unflattering. The dress makes her look flat-chested and draws attention to her arms.

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12 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Last night I watched BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT '56. It stars fave Dana Andrews and not fave Joan Fontaine. It's well acted, beautifully shot and very well edited, making a great introductory film for anyone not familiar with classic film or noir.

It's a story of the controversy of capital punishment. Can someone innocent be convicted on circumstantial evidence? 

Of course as I watched, realized I had seen it numerous times before. I suppose the reason why it's not in my Fritz Lang "collection" is because it somehow rings hollow. The twists & turns are great, as is the tension it builds, but I just can't stand Joan Fontaine's whiney charactor. I did find the portrayal of "loose women" a hoot, though-talk about stereotype!

There's only a few crime noirs that still work once you know the ending, CAPE FEAR, DOA are the best example that comes to mind. I'd chalk BEYOND A REASONABLE DOUBT up as "great for first viewing, good for second viewing, but once you know the ending, forget it."

th?id=OIP.bJAL_wojwv1FFnVVkVMtiwHaLH&pid

beyond2.JPG

Could she BE any more skeletal? Look at those big hands!

(while annoying, J Fontaine is truly a talented actress...she aced the US accent)

I agree with you re: this film.  It was good the first time I saw it, but now that I know the "twist" ending, I can't help but feel it seems a little contrived?

Re: Fontaine.  I love Fontaine too, but in this film, the hair and costume people made her look so severe.  Fontaine is always thin in her films, but I agree with you that she's very thin in this film.  The strapless gowns didn't do her any favors either. But I think the pulled back, blonde hair is what killed her look in this film.  She was only 40 (I think) when she made this film and she looks much older.  In this photo, if someone told me that she played Dana Andrews' mother, I would believe them. 

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On 5/21/2020 at 1:27 PM, NickAndNora34 said:

N A LONELY PLACE (1950) *Score: 3/5* (Bogie's character made me so angry; I'm sorry) 

Starring: Humphrey Bogart, Gloria Grahame, Frank Lovejoy, Carl Benton Reid. 

I finally got around to finishing this; it's on the Criterion channel, but the site kept buffering for me for so long that I gave up for a while. I am glad I returned; this one was pretty solid. I thought it was quite interesting to see Bogie in a more despicable role than usual. Even when he's playing a tough guy he still manages to be quite likable. I guess you could say he had the range. 

About 10 years ago there was a virtual civil war about this film over in either FILM AND FILMMAKERS or MY FAVORITES. One side said that Dixon was a great guy and it was all Laurel'f fault. The other side said that Laurel loved Dixon Steele until he started acting weird and fully justified to want to get out. More than once it seemed to me that the Dixon side liked Bogie (forget about Dixon) too much to take the other side. Dixon Steele was sympathetic at first but his behavior became unnacceptable and maniacal. Oh, but he was in the war, we must sympathize with those who have battle fatigue. Tell that to Laurel. But Laurel is a femme fatale. Just what was that all about with Mr Baker?  Whatever she was (said the other side) she was genuinely afraid and thought that Dixon might kill her. Gosh, they looked so good sitting at the piano bar. too.

Someone posted about Wynona Ryder with a movie poster 2003ca. Can't find it. Recently watched Plot Against America (TV miniseries) from 2018 and she looked great? She was 46 at the time, her character could have been 29.

 

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1 hour ago, laffite said:

About 10 years ago there was a virtual civil war about this film over in either FILM AND FILMMAKERS or MY FAVORITES. One side said that Dixon was a great guy and it was all Laurel'f fault. The other side said that Laurel loved Dixon Steele until he started acting weird and fully justified to want to get out. More than once it seemed to me that the Dixon side liked Bogie (forget about Dixon) too much to take the other side. Dixon Steele was sympathetic at first but his behavior became unnacceptable and maniacal. Oh, but he was in the war, we must sympathize with those who have battle fatigue. Tell that to Laurel. But Laurel is a femme fatale. Just what was that all about with Mr Baker?  Whatever she was (said the other side) she was genuinely afraid and thought that Dixon might kill her. Gosh, they looked so good sitting at the piano bar. too.

 

 

Although Bogart and Grahame have good chemistry, in real life if I were Laurel's friend I would be so glad once she and Dixon were over. He's a very scary guy.

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13 hours ago, EricJ said:

She managed the role a little better in the Broadway musical, though:  

Wow. A real live full orchestra & people singing without headgear microphones! Wonder how they managed that? Or, more to the point-wonder why they CAN'T manage that today? (when Broadway reopens)

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9 hours ago, kingrat said:

Although Bogart and Grahame have good chemistry, in real life if I were Laurel's friend I would be so glad once she and Dixon were over. He's a very scary guy.

Apparently there was an element of the real Bogart to Dixon Steele, which helps to explain why he is so chillingly effective in the role. I read that Lauren Bacall was frightened by him when he had a temper tantrum on his yacht one time, though there is no report that he struck her.

We've all seen women who get into relationships with bad boys. I knew one who kept breaking up with one low life, only to sneak back to him again time after time. On at least one occasion she called me to help her get away from this guy who had a wild temper and threatened me with violence, as he did others. He was in and out of prison like the institution had a revolving door. She once told me that it was difficult for her to explain a "sick relationship." She only got freed of him when he got kicked out of the country and, even then, she remained in contact with a guy who had physically and psychologically abused her and even once travelled to his country to see him, with hopes that he would get re-admitted back into Canada.

They don't all finally walk away for good like Gloria Grahame did in this film. And Dixon Steele at the end is also ready to call it quits like he realizes he went too far. Give me a break! In real life the disturbed creeps beg for forgiveness after trying to kill a girl, she invariably gives it to him and he's soon abusing her once again. It's a never ending circle of abuse, unless she really does emancipate herself. but, even then, she may be forced to hide in terror from him.

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10 hours ago, speedracer5 said:

I agree with you re: this film.  It was good the first time I saw it, but now that I know the "twist" ending, I can't help but feel it seems a little contrived?

Every time they mentioned Emma Blucher I couldn't help but neigh

 

 

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20 hours ago, Fedya said:

Designing Woman (1957).

MGM remade Woman of the Year, because they could.  Lucas McCain gets to essay his native Brooklyn accent as a gangster who threatens sportswriter Gregory Peck.  Lauren Bacall is as bland as ever as the fashion designer Peck hastily marries and who flies off the handle because Peck, horror of horrors, might have had a girlfriend before marrying her.

Competently made, but nothing special.  6/10

As much as I like WOMAN OF THE YEAR, I actually like DESIGNING WOMAN a bit better. I didn't find Lauren all that bland, though I do agree her reaction to Peck's previous entanglements before they got married, is ridiculous.

I also love how (SPOILER ALERT) Lauren's pal, the one a bit on the nerdy side and whom Peck had no use for, actually helped to save the day in the end.

As for IN A LONELY PLACE, Gloria Grahame turns in what I consider THE best performance of her career and should have been nominated for it. Bogart was great in it too.

(Again, SPOILERS)….Dixon was a dangerous, unpredictable man but I also think he was beaten down by the PSTD he suffered from the war. Which is why he lets Laurel dumps him without a fuss and walks out of her apartment (and presumedly her life).

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29 minutes ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

As much as I like WOMAN OF THE YEAR, I actually like DESIGNING WOMAN a bit better. I didn't find Lauren all that bland, though I do agree her reaction to Peck's previous entanglements before they got married, is ridiculous.

I actually kinda like DESIGNING WOMAN and its unusual structure.  I also like the way Peck says "Marilla." Also, DELORES GREY (sp?) is fabby.

I would go so far as to say that I dislike WOMAN OF THE YEAR, neither Tracy nor (especially) HEPBURN is likeable and the kitchen-disaster-ending is dumb.

Also, that poor Greek orphan.

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