Jump to content

 
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
speedracer5

I Just Watched...

Recommended Posts

9 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I watched HORROR OF DRACULA (1958) this morning.

I own this movie on DVD- although I don't have the RESTORED ENDING VERSION that came out (I think only on blu-ray) a few years back, I've watched the COMPLETE final scene on youtube 1000 times.

I watch this movie every time it comes on TCM.

i've probably watched it 5 or more times a year for the last 10 years.

and you know what?

I don't even like it all that much.

Or do I?

I caught the ending this morning. I love it, I've seen it many times but not all the way through in a few years. My favorite scene doesn't even involve Dracula. It is when the newly undead Lucy (Carol Marsh) who appears very sweet but actually wants to put the bite on her brother (Michael Gough) but becomes a hissing vampire when Van Helsing (Peter Cushing) shows her the crucifix. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I caught the ending this morning. I love it, I've seen it many times but not all the way through in a few years. My favorite scene doesn't even involve Dracula. It is when the newly undead Lucy (Carol Marsh) who appears very sweet but actually wants to put the bite on her brother (Michael Gough) but becomes a hissing vampire when Van Helsing (Peter Cushing) shows her the crucifix. 

i've posted this many times before, but here is the FULLY RESTORED ENDING SCENE, which includes FOOTAGE NOT SEEN IN 60 YEARS- you see DRACULA'S BONES as his hands and feet shrivel away and at 51 seconds in, there are a couple of frames of CHRISTOPHER LEE clawing away at the skin on his face, this was- I think- in a JAPANESE VERSION that was found.

take the time to watch it, it's great (I don't think TCM shows the fully restored ending version)

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

I caught the ending this morning. I love it, I've seen it many times but not all the way through in a few years. My favorite scene doesn't even involve Dracula. It is when the newly undead Lucy (Carol Marsh) who appears very sweet but actually wants to put the bite on her brother (Michael Gough) but becomes a hissing vampire when Van Helsing (Peter Cushing) shows her the crucifix. 

I love that scene too.

I adore HORROR OF DRACULA.

The majority opinion seems to be that Bela Lugosi is the ultimate Dracula, and while Lugosi certainly made for a creepy vampire, I must say Christopher Lee is more than a match for him.

I love Peter Cushing as Dr. Van Helsing. The final battle between him and Lee's Dracula is exciting.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you know, eese fonny,

I recently completed a screenplay that is a re-imagining of one particular classic horror film but which also pays homage to a lot of other classic horror films and- in fact- starts with a scene that is almost identical to the ending of HORROR OF DRACULA, but in the place of PETER CUSHING, there is a NINE-YEAR OLD EASTERN EUROPEAN GIRL who dispatches the vampire as if she were aiming a magnifying glass over a bug in August.

And since I finished it, I have been DEVOURING CLASSIC HORROR MOVIES and have been LOVING THEM MORE THAN EVER because I recognize all the little things I derived from them...and in some cases outright stole!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

That's an interesting comparison to later sitcoms. I never thought of the similarity but I see it now. Arthur Lake's Dagwood could have inspired Ozzie Nelson (he even resembles him).

Funny you mention Ozzie Nelson because when I was listing those sit-coms I grew up with,   Ozzie and Harriet came to mind,,,, but then it came to me;  Ozzie is no Robert Young!,,,, he is more like Arthur Lake.     So maybe Ozzie was one of the first to be star in a sit-com and be the misguided \ clueless father.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, jamesjazzguitar said:

Funny you mention Ozzie Nelson because when I was listing those sit-coms I grew up with,   Ozzie and Harriet came to mind,,,, but then it came to me;  Ozzie is no Robert Young!,,,, he is more like Arthur Lake.     So maybe Ozzie was one of the first to be star in a sit-com and be the misguided \ clueless father.

 

He wasn't a father, but there's always Ralph Kramden.  He was a mostly-clueless husband.

Also, there's Chester Riley from The Life of Riley.   First aired as a radio sitcom from 1944.  First TV series was in  1949 (with Jackie Gleason).  Later series on TV with radio's Riley, William Bendix.    Obviously the times wouldn't allow Riley to be as coarse or edgy as Al Bundy, but he was definitely a departure from the Jim Anderson mold.

And speaking of Father Knows Best, the tone of the show shifted when it moved from radio to TV.   The radio Jim is a bit more sarcastic than the TV version (both played by Robert Young).

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Bethluvsfilms said:

I love that scene too.

I adore HORROR OF DRACULA.

The majority opinion seems to be that Bela Lugosi is the ultimate Dracula, and while Lugosi certainly made for a creepy vampire, I must say Christopher Lee is more than a match for him.

I love Peter Cushing as Dr. Van Helsing. The final battle between him and Lee's Dracula is exciting.

What I like about the Hammer version is the fantastic score by the great James Bernard,he started doing the scores for Hammer 1 or 2 years before Dracula,but he really define his style with Dracula.Bernard uses drums,snares & cymbals, with speed metal violins,he is an heavy metal classical composer a bit like Wagner I would say even if my knowledge of Wagner's music is limited.Bernard made almost all the important Hammer movies-at least 20--sometime his score is scarier than what you see...I discovered his music as a teenager,i was watching a lot of Hammer movies on tv and noticed his powerful style,Bernard's music is an integral part of every film he scored ,The Dracula theme is noticeable since he scored several of the films. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night I watched my TCM recording of WOMAN ON THE RUN '50.

Love Ann Sheridan and this has a bonus of the last scenes taking place in an Amusement Park.

It's a pretty solid noir/suspense movie of a man who has witnessed a murder & goes into hiding. Sheridan plays his wife and along with the police & newspaperman, all are looking for the missing husband. There are several clues along the way, some subtle/some blatant.

I liked how Sheridan plays her role coldly & defensively at first and we get more of her story as the movie goes along. It's a distraction and keeps us guessing as to what's going on.

At the sand sculpture location, I realized this wasn't my first time seeing this. I had forgotten how bad the rear projection  roller coaster ride was-laughable! But this was a pretty enjoyable movie and it seemed like it held a lot in it's 77 minute running time.

On a personal level, I really enjoyed the "store mannequin" scene. (wow-amusement park AND window dresser shop!) As someone who has been a "window dresser" in an earlier career, I always like seeing the shops in a historical context. In the 40's-50's mannequins were made by covering burlap forms with plaster facial sculptures which quickly deteriorate with use. It showed the husband "repairing" the facial masks to resemble Ann Sheridan's face. Ann Sheridan sure had huge eyes! 

220px-Woman_on_the_Run.jpg

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, nakano said:

What I like about the Hammer version is the fantastic score by the great James Bernard,he started doing the scores for Hammer 1 or 2 years before Dracula,but he really define his style with Dracula.Bernard uses drums,snares & cymbals, with speed metal violins,he is an heavy metal classical composer a bit like Wagner I would say even if my knowledge of Wagner's music is limited.Bernard made almost all the important Hammer movies-at least 20--sometime his score is scarier than what you see...I discovered his music as a teenager,i was watching a lot of Hammer movies on tv and noticed his powerful style,Bernard's music is an integral part of every film he scored ,The Dracula theme is noticeable since he scored several of the films. 

YES!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I always sing along "Draaacula!....Drac Drac Drac Draaaaacuuuuluuuuh" to that MARVELOUS MUSICAL  MOVEMENT THAT REPEAT AS A LIETMOTIF THROUGHOUT THE FILMS. The scores for HORROR OF DRACULA, DRACULA PRINCE OF DARKNESS, ... HAS RISEN FROM THE GRAVE, TASTE THE BLOOD OF, AND SCARS OF are ALL EQUALLY MARVELOUS, I have no favorite....ACTUALLY, MAYBE THE SCORE TO "SCARS OF"

I legit listen to them ALL THE TIME on my phone on youtube- they were GREAT for lifting to before the GYM shut down- and now when i clean or do yard work.

and EVERY TIME IN MY LIFE that I am IN A HURRY TO GET SOMETHING DONE, I will ALWAYS hear the HURRIED FINALE TO THE SCORE OF HORROR OF DRACULA for the scene where VAN HELSING tracks him down in the library and destroys him.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

unfortunately, I cannot play them in my car BUT CAN YOU IMAGINE HOW AWESOME IT WOULD BE TO PULL UP NEXT TO SOMEONE AT A RED LIGHT WHILE BLASTING THE OPENING SCORE OF HORROR OF DRACULA????

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FULL DISCLOSURE: For the most part, I do not watch modern films. Goofy as this may sound, I struggle with depression, and honestly- some movies nowadays are just so poorly done that it can trigger a MAJOR DEPRESSIVE EPISODE in me. For example, I'm still not over the re re re re re re booting of HALLOWEEN from a year or two ago.

That said, I saw where KNIVES OUT (2019?) was on AMAZON PRIME, so I started it figuring I'd hate watch it and turn it off.

I ended up pretty compelled.

One thing I must note about the experience was that every 10-20 minutes WITHOUT FAIL, the movie would freeze and I would have to either go back to the menu and restart or turn off the TV entirely. It got to be pretty crafty about this, it would freeze and i'd get up to do something and it would un-freeze as i was in the can or whatever, only to re-freeze the minute I walked back into the room. It also un-froze numerous times as I held the power button down and the TV went black.

it was evil.

Thusly, it took me 18 hours to watch this movie (I went to bed after having to restart it 12 times last night) I finished it this morning, (it froze another 12 times), and since this is a 2 hour 9 minute movie, it was an effort.

that said, this was well written and the script was nominated for an Oscar- it's very AGATHA CHRISTIE, but it's also very VERY DICKENSY. The acting was also largely great- apparently DON JOHNSON is a "thing" again- he was quite  apt in his role; I had really hoped before society crumbled that JAMIE LEE CURTIS would finally get nominated- now I don't know if it's gonna happen - but man, she has been a powerful and confident force in films for so long and she was great in this (maybe she knows she's got some apologizing to do for that HALLOWEEN rerererereboot), CHRISTOPHER PLUMMER makes me glad someone remembered he was still around after appearing in some REALLY BAD MOVIES in the 80's and 90's- but the performance the blew me away the most was DANIEL CRAIG as a southerm-accented investigator. He nails the part and I will keep an eye out for anything he does in the future.

knives-out-1200-1200-675-675-crop-000000

I guessed who the murderer was- but the murder (as in GOSFORD PARK) is not ENTIRELY the central story, and if if you figure out whodunnit- there are CLUES you are gonna miss along the way, and having them explained is pretty interesting.

this is a rare modern film that has a VERY OLD FASHIONED SPIRIT to it, and it works.

An episode of MURDER SHE WROTE in ESPANOL makes a brief appearance.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I  have HOD on the DVR in order to resume my continued off and on not terribly focused lack of enthusiasm for Drac movies.  I don't have a storehouse of memories of having watch such, but this was one seems vaguely familiar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MURDER BY CONTRACT (1958)  - unusual film starring VINCE EDWARDS.  It was much more interesting than I expected.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Prisoner (1955).

Alec Guinness stars as a Roman Catholic prelate loosely based on Hungary's József Mindszenty.  Guinness is arrested and taken to prison by Jack Hawkins, who is looking to looking to secure a confession of trumped-up charges of functioning outside the (presumably) Marxist regime.  (It's never stated exactly what country the movie is supposed to be set in.  Hawkins, knowing that Guinness was able to resist physical torture from his days fighting the Gestapo, realizes that the  way to get to Guinness is to figure out what his own psychological flaw is and crack that open.  But at what cost?

This is a slow, talky movie based mostly on the two leads, with a plot that for the most part doesn't go anywhere, other than a tacked-on romantic subplot that doesn't fit at all.  Unsurprisingly, however, Guinness and Hawkins both give excellent performances, with Wilfrid Lawson as a prison guard giving a good supporting performance.

7.5/10

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Fedya said:

The Prisoner (1955).

Alec Guinness stars as a Roman Catholic prelate loosely based on Hungary's József Mindszenty.  Guinness is arrested and taken to prison by Jack Hawkins, who is looking to looking to secure a confession of trumped-up charges of functioning outside the (presumably) Marxist regime.  (It's never stated exactly what country the movie is supposed to be set in.  Hawkins, knowing that Guinness was able to resist physical torture from his days fighting the Gestapo, realizes that the  way to get to Guinness is to figure out what his own psychological flaw is and crack that open.  But at what cost?

This is a slow, talky movie based mostly on the two leads, with a plot that for the most part doesn't go anywhere, other than a tacked-on romantic subplot that doesn't fit at all.  Unsurprisingly, however, Guinness and Hawkins both give excellent performances, with Wilfrid Lawson as a prison guard giving a good supporting performance.

7.5/10

Fedya, I saw this several years ago and had very much the same reaction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should have mentioned in my previous post that I kept thinking of Costa-Gavras' The Confession as I was watching.  That one I think is better in no small part because it handles real-life story better.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched HANG 'EM HIGH, a 1960's western starring Clint Eastwood as a man who becomes the victim of a bloodthirsty lynch mob. He survives the lynching and I kept thinking those guys are going to regret not making sure they finished the job.

(SPOILERS) And I was right....Clint picks them off one by one, including Ed Begley as the leader of the mob.

Also Alan Hale, Jr. is one of the lynchers too and even he isn't spared.

In a curious turn of events, Clint is appointed deputy by a judge (Pat Hingle) after recovering from his ordeal, but I don't know why the judge thought THAT was a good idea if he wanted all the men involved tried and convicted legally. I think anyone in Clint's shoes would have been gunning for revenge and doing it HIS own way.

Still an interesting film though. I give it 7/10.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did anyone else watch Our Betters as part of the LGBT spotlight? The character of Ernest, only on screen about five minutes, is one of the better-known examples of a gay character in early 1930s movies. Ernest is a screaming queen stereotype who wears more lipstick and rouge than the gals. The response to Ernest over the decades from gay viewers has tended to be either 1) this is an embarrassing and hurtful stereotype or 2) better an embarrassing stereotype than no representation of gay characters at all. As seen, Ernest seems to be a nasty bit of goods, getting his revenge on life by making cutting remarks about the titled ladies who let him in the circle of their acquaintance.

Our Betters is a stagy rendering of a Somerset Maugham play. George Cukor will have learned a lot by the time he directs another comedy, Dinner at Eight. It's fairly entertaining and for the most part decently acted, with Violet Kemble Cooper as the Duchess Minnie stealing all the scenes she's in. Gilbert Roland will have better roles and will look more attractive later on than he does as her gigolo Pepi. Constance Bennett, who has the main role, was a big star in the early 1930s, at one time said to be the highest paid star in Hollywood. She's a competent actress, but if classic film fans today know Claudette Colbert much better, that seems fair to me.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kingrat said:

Did anyone else watch Our Betters as part of the LGBT spotlight? The character of Ernest, only on screen about five minutes, is one of the better-known examples of a gay character in early 1930s movies. Ernest is a screaming queen stereotype who wears more lipstick and rouge than the gals. The response to Ernest over the decades from gay viewers has tended to be either 1) this is an embarrassing and hurtful stereotype or 2) better an embarrassing stereotype than no representation of gay characters at all. As seen, Ernest seems to be a nasty bit of goods, getting his revenge on life by making cutting remarks about the titled ladies who let him in the circle of their acquaintance.

Our Betters is a stagy rendering of a Somerset Maugham play. George Cukor will have learned a lot by the time he directs another comedy, Dinner at Eight. It's fairly entertaining and for the most part decently acted, with Violet Kemble Cooper as the Duchess Minnie stealing all the scenes she's in. Gilbert Roland will have better roles and will look more attractive later on than he does as her gigolo Pepi. Constance Bennett, who has the main role, was a big star in the early 1930s, at one time said to be the highest paid star in Hollywood. She's a competent actress, but if classic film fans today know Claudette Colbert much better, that seems fair to me.

I caught some of it before getting called away. 
I know Constance Bennett gets a lot of flack – apparently she was not a nice person in real life and ended up pretty much wrecking her career- But this was one of those times where she really found a perfect role.

Maybe it’s the Episcopalian in me, But I love how devastatingly blasé she and her husband are about the fact that they are so completely and utterly not in love and can barely stand to be in one another’s presence with such civility.

LOVE WHEN CONNIE WEARS BLACK to be RECEIVED by HER MAJESTY! AT THE PALACE!!!!

Not until Sharon Stone wore that turtleneck to the 96 Oscars would such a daring act of  FASHION DEFIANCE be again pulled off!

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just watched 1950's TUNES OF GLORY starring powerhouses Alec Guinness & John Mills. It's a story of a post war Scottish regiment presently commanded by Guinness' charactor, a flamboyant good ole boy type soon to be replaced with a "book learned"  Colonel played by John Mills. The reason for the replacement is not revealed, but everyone seems resigned to this fact as matter of course.

The Mills charactor arrives a day early and is not amused to find the regiment drinking & dancing in celebration- an early illustration of the two Colonel's contrasting personalities. There is nothing more that I can say without revealing the plot. It's quite a simple story, the complexity is really in the wonderful performances.

I had a tough time fully understanding the dialogue, often spoken in a Scottish brogue, but mostly got the gist of what was said. Colonel "Mills" is described as a "wee" Colonel, "wee" being a common, constant put-down, although I did notice John Mills diminutive stature compared to others.

The sets were palatial and wholly believable, providing gorgeous back ground for the incredible photography by Arthur Ibbetson. The costuming was also just beautiful, who doesn't love men in skirts? I very much enjoyed the "pipe" music and especially seeing the men joyously dancing with each other. It is very apparent dancing "reels" is the basis of American Square dancing (glad this historical dance was taught in grade school curriculum) And that folk dancing aspect becomes a focal point in the conflict.

This movie is charactor driven, not a war picture. The production & performances are top notch. I made this a drinking game, every time they said or drank Scotch, took a sip of my beloved Lagavulin.

Tunes_of_glory76.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

I just watched 1950's TUNES OF GLORY starring powerhouses Alec Guinness & John Mills.

I had a tough time fully understanding the dialogue, often spoken in a Scottish brogue, but mostly got the gist of what was said.

The sets were palatial and wholly believable, providing gorgeous back ground for the incredible photography by Arthur Ibbetson.

 

1. it's 1960 actually, notable because that was a HUGE year for STRONG MALE PERFORMANCES.

2. I know right? I am a big fan of CLOSED CAPTIONING- I watch every movie I can with it on and prefer it that way- and TUNES OF GLORY is one of those where it HELPS A LOT.

3. I KNOW RIGHT??? I read that the actual military base denied them a shooting permit so they had to construct those interiors and the details were AMAZING- right down to the worn-down grooves in the steps on the ancient stone staircases.  (those of you who have been to EUROPE and toured a castle or historic site of any kind will know that the steps are all SO OLD that there are grooves in them where centuries of feet have worn them down...also people in YE OLDE EUROPE had tiny little Barbie doll feet because the steps are like eight inches deep.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oh by the way,

I killed MOVIELAND.

Well, I don't know if it was my posting about it here, but the channel has been removed from ROKU and I am SO ****ING BUMMED I COULD JUST...

tenor.gif?itemid=5471487

APOLOGIES TO ALL OF YOU WHO DOWNLOADED IT RECENTLY AT MY URGING, SORRY TO HAVE OFFERED YOU A CUP OF MANNA FROM HEAVEN ONLY TO HAVE SNATCHED SO SOON!!!!!!

RIP MOVIELAND....SWEET DIGITAL NEPENTHE. YOU WERE THE BEST!!!!!!!!!!!

I NEVER GOT TO FINISH TRON.

  • Sad 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Synanon Poster

Synanon (1965) DVD 7/10

A study of drug addicts in an real life treatment center.

This is a good film with an interesting cast. Third billed Alex Cord is actually the main character, the weirdly named Zankie Albo, a slick braggart with an addiction to heroin. Stella Stevens (one of her best performances) is Joaney, a divorcee with a young son who resorted to prostitution to pay for her habit. She gets involved with the charming but dangerous Albo. Top billed Chuck Connors (fresh from The Rifleman) is Ben the ex con who kicked his "H" addiction but has to contend with trouble maker Albo, who was his cell mate in prison and has a beef against him. Oscar winner Edmond O'Brien is Chuck Dederich the head of Synanon, he uses tough talk and punishments like having heads shaved and wearing humiliating signs for breaking the rules. Other "dope fiends" are played by Richard Conte, Eartha Kitt and Bernie Hamiliton.

I have seen this a few times and checked it out again after seeing a story on the Oxygen show Deadly Cults. It seems that in the 1970s Synanon  changed from a treatment center to a religion and became a cult. Head shavings was no longer a punishment but a requirement. In 1978, Dederich was suspected of ordering the murder of  a lawyer who successfully sued Synanon. The lawyer found a rattlesnake in his mailbox, was bitten but survived. Dederich pleaded no contest to assault and conspiracy to commit murder, he got probation instead of prison since his lawyers claimed he was in ill health and close to death, however he lived another 18 years.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

oh by the way,

I killed MOVIELAND.

Well, I don't know if it was my posting about it here, but the channel has been removed from ROKU and I am SO ****ING BUMMED I COULD JUST...

tenor.gif?itemid=5471487

APOLOGIES TO ALL OF YOU WHO DOWNLOADED IT RECENTLY AT MY URGING, SORRY TO HAVE OFFERED YOU A CUP OF MANNA FROM HEAVEN ONLY TO HAVE SNATCHED SO SOON!!!!!!

RIP MOVIELAND....SWEET DIGITAL NEPENTHE. YOU WERE THE BEST!!!!!!!!!!!

I NEVER GOT TO FINISH TRON.

It must be just a little darker in Dark City tonight. 😉

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

oh by the way,

I killed MOVIELAND.

Well, I don't know if it was my posting about it here, but the channel has been removed from ROKU and I am SO ****ING BUMMED I COULD JUST...

tenor.gif?itemid=5471487

APOLOGIES TO ALL OF YOU WHO DOWNLOADED IT RECENTLY AT MY URGING, SORRY TO HAVE OFFERED YOU A CUP OF MANNA FROM HEAVEN ONLY TO HAVE SNATCHED SO SOON!!!!!!

RIP MOVIELAND....SWEET DIGITAL NEPENTHE. YOU WERE THE BEST!!!!!!!!!!!

I NEVER GOT TO FINISH TRON.

Fortunately, I was able to watch "The Name of the Rose" and practically everyone's favorite campy 1960's drama, "Valley of the Dolls" before Movieland bit the dust.  So, Ms. LornaHansonForbes, it was you that got Movieland removed from Roku systems far and wide, huh?  My initial reaction was the exact same thing Marlene Dietrich said in court when she learned she had been duped by Charles Laughton in "Witness For The Prosecution", and I quote:  'Damn You!'  'Damn You!'  'DAAAAAAMMMMMNNNNN YOOOOOOUUUUU!!!!!".  But, as Scarlett O'Hara said more than once, "Fiddle-dee-dee; tomorrow's another day!".   😉

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

© 2020 Turner Classic Movies Inc. A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved Terms of Use | Privacy Policy | Cookie Settings
×
×
  • Create New...