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King Kong

Many moons ago a friend told me that there's a scene in Kong, one of the dinosaur battles, where you can see a pair of pliers at the bottom of the screen. I have yet, in many years of viewing this film, have ever seen any tools. Have any of you ever heard of this or seen it?

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58 minutes ago, Janet0312 said:

King Kong

Many moons ago a friend told me that there's a scene in Kong, one of the dinosaur battles, where you can see a pair of pliers at the bottom of the screen. I have yet, in many years of viewing this film, have ever seen any tools. Have any of you ever heard of this or seen it?

below is a link to the goofs section for KING KONG on imdb, I skimmed it and did not see anything about any pliers, although apparently, in one frame, you can see the animation stand...I noticed that many of the goofs have been amended to mention that they have been digitally removed over time, so it's possible (depending on what version you saw) that the mistake was covered up by technology- which I kinda hate.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0024216/goofs

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I finally got the chance to see THE DEVIL RIDES OUT (1967- US TITLE: BRIDE OF THE DEVIL), a HAMMER HORROR film that some (including CHRISTOPHER LEE) claim is the best film HAMMER ever did.

Meh.

As someone who is a fan of HAMMER HORROR, I will be the first to declare that the company never made a FULLY satisfying film- they came close a few times (as with THE BRIDES OF DRACULA) but there is always some issue with the SCRIPT, the DIRECTION or (often the case) THE BUDGET- and the limitations ultimately render a lot of their films that could have been really something into **1/2 ventures.

This was allegedly one of CHRISTOPHER LEE'S favorites of his own films, if not the favorite- I kinda can't help but feel like it's because it was the just about the only time he played THE HERO (he is not a bad guy in HOUND OF THE BASKERVILLES, but he's not the hero.) I have to say he is quite miscast and someone with a less commanding presence is what the part really needed,

There are A LOT OF NICE VINTAGE AUTOS and scenes of the British Countryside (this is the VERY RARE HAMMER FEATURE that actually uses A LOT of exteriors and seems also to have shot AT ACTUAL NIGHT, a opposed to using DAY-FOR-NIGHT, which was a trick HAMMER used A LOT and it definitely ruins some scenes in some of their other films.

I swear I can see seeds for ROSEMARY'S BABY being sown with this one; it's also a lot like NIGHT OF THE DEMON (1957?), but I have to say that movie is much, much better than this one.

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On 6/26/2020 at 12:51 AM, YourManGodfrey said:

Black Legion (1937)

I don’t have a lot to say about this film other than I was able to tick off another Bogart film.
 

Hardcore (1979)

Liam Neesom gives a really good performance in this— whoops, wrong film. I honestly have no interest in this era of film, but I really enjoyed this. It’s very, very gritty and George C. Scott is a great actor. It’s actually my first Scott film and I’ll have to seek out some more of his work. 

My husband and I watched Black Legion together last week.  We feel it should be required viewing, even today.  You could swap out the Polish and Irish immigrants with Latinos or Asians, and the same movie could be made today.   I think it says something very true and frightening about American xenophobia.

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I watched the last half of Madchen in Uniform (1931) and found it very powerful, way ahead of its time.  I hope it's On Demand, so that I can see the whole thing.  Watermelon Woman was enjoyable  and very apropos of the current discussions about racial stereotypes.  I found the sex a bit more than what I'd expect on TCM, but thought the idea was intriguing and really appreciated the mix of documentary style and fiction.

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The Private Files of J. Edgar Hoover Poster

The Private Files Of J Edgar Hoover (1977) TCM 4/10

The career of the FBI director (Broderick Crawford).

This was a slapdash exploitation picture done just 5 years after Hoover's death. Crawford tries his best in the role but we rarely get to see his trademark toughness and bombast. The most interesting thing about it was large number of classic stars in mostly small roles-Jose Ferrer, Dan Dailey (as Hoover's longtime companion and  aide Clyde Tolson), Lloyd Nolan, June Havoc (as Hoover's mother), Howard DaSilva (as FDR) and Celeste Holm. It has some newreel footage and some bad dialogue. Rip Torn plays a fictional FBI agent who wants to be a whistle blower. Some of the better moments have Hoover and Bobby Kennedy (Michael Parks) doing some sparring. The gay affair between Hoover and Tolson is mentioned only briefly, the two are seen privately denying it. 

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2 hours ago, Det Jim McLeod said:

The Private Files of J. Edgar Hoover Poster

The Private Files Of J Edgar Hoover (1977) TCM 4/10

The career of the FBI director (Broderick Crawford).

This was a slapdash exploitation picture done just 5 years after Hoover's death. Crawford tries his best in the role but we rarely get to see his trademark toughness and bombast. The most interesting thing about it was large number of classic stars in mostly small roles-Jose Ferrer, Dan Dailey (as Hoover's longtime companion and  aide Clyde Tolson), Lloyd Nolan, June Havoc (as Hoover's mother), Howard DaSilva (as FDR) and Celeste Holm. It has some newreel footage and some bad dialogue. Rip Torn plays a fictional FBI agent who wants to be a whistle blower. Some of the better moments have Hoover and Bobby Kennedy (Michael Parks) doing some sparring. The gay affair between Hoover and Tolson is mentioned only briefly, the two are seen privately denying it. 

I am very disappointed that this and IT'S ALIVE encored mere months after their last showing on UNDERGROUND (they have the same writer/director)

On its last airing, I made it about 30 minutes in to THE PRIVATE FILES OF J. EDGAR HOOVER before I just COULD NOT GO ON, it was SO ASTOUNDINGLY, JAW-DROPPINGLY, MADDENINGLY AMATEUR...I know a lot of the faded NAME STARS in this were no much in demand, but it still ASTOUNDS me that this movie attracted the cast that it did (they must not have had good representation because NO AGENT WORTH THEIR 10%  would let AN ESTABLISHED STAR appear in something THIS POORLY EXECUTED) , although I'll be the first to admit that, in my opinion, BRODERICK CRAWFORD was the worst actor to win an Academy Award in the 20th century.

I think the final straw for me was a street scene that was supposed to be set in the 1930's and there is an extra with FARRAH FAWCETT HAIR- the bangs, the flyaways, everything. If a woman had worn hair like that in public in 1936, I have a strong feeling she'd've been burned at the stake.

I also recall actors visibly struggling with their lines, a 48 year old man cast as 24 year old Hoover who then just becomes BROD CRAWFORD with no exposition in the later scenes, and a scene where people duck and hit the ground before someone starts firing a gun.

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SO, THIS IS MORE ABOUT SOMETHING THAT I JUST READ, BUT SINCE IT APPLIES TO ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS CLASSIC MOVIES, AND ONE OFTEN DISCUSSED HERE, FIGURED I'D POST THIS IN THIS THREAD:

I just read GRAND HOTEL by VICKI BAUM, and was very impressed by it- I have to say that the makers of the movie really missed out on the tone and nuance of the book, although (understandably) some of the details would never have been allowed to have made it to the screen even in the days before the Hayes Code.  You get even more of a sense of interconnection and fate between the collected characters.

differences between the film and the novel: (SPOILERS)

Grusinskaya- aka The GARBO character- only appears in the first 1/3 of the book, then she checks out (with the understanding she and HERR BARON will reunite in Tremezzo at her Villa.) She is written as MIDDLE AGED and even has AN 8 YEAR OLD GRANDSON! She is a fascinating character study- it's ironic to me that GARBO (allegedly) felt she was too old to play a prima ballerina, because the whole crux of her character is that she is at the edge of a mid-life crisis. She and the Baron also sleep with each other after he is caught breaking into her room.

Herr Baron Felix Von Gaigern- ( THE JOHN BARRYMOORE CHARACTER) Is written as a handsome YOUNG MAN- in his twenties, a veteran of WWI who was, in fact, saved by the DOCTOR CHARACTER (played by LEWIS STONE in the film) after being injured on the battlefield and is thusly convinced by the doctor to return the wallet he steals from KREINGELEIN (the Lionel Barrymoore character)

Kringelein- (aka The LIONEL BARRYMOORE character) is MUCH LESS ANNOYING IN THE BOOK, in fact- one could argue he is the DE FACTO HERO of the tale who appears in the entire tale and is the link between all the characters. Most shocking is the fact that, after the Baron is murdered by the businessman PREYSING, FLAMMCHIEN (the Crawford character) runs naked and screaming down the halls and into his arms where they make love to one another (!!!!) BEFORE CALLING THE POLICE.  His victory over the Preysing character is a lot more impactful in the book as he also enjoys toying with PREYSING before calling the cops on him.

Flaemchien (the CRAWFORD character) is only 19 and there is a scene where she and PREYSING have sex before he catches THE BARON in his room and kills him. she is a bit more complicated than she is in the movie, and you get the sense that this is maybe the character with which the author sympathized with and understood the most.

Preysing (the WALLACE BEERY character) is actually not as awful as he is in the movie, in fact it is worth noting that THE BARON lies to him and tells him that he is holding a gun on him before Preysing beats him to death, which even the author admits introduces the idea that it was a justifiable homicide (nonetheless, he is ruined and goes to prison.)

Dr Otto- The LEWIS STONE character is a WWI field surgeon who had half his face blown off by a shell in the war. he is a MORPHINE ADDICT and has a much greater presence in the novel- although the film does copy his closing monologue almost word for word.

there is also a character of a BELLHOP who finds a GOLD CIGARETTE CASE of THE BARON'S and agonizes over returning it to him because he is in love with a girl he wants to give it to, which quite intriguingly parallel's THE BARON'S resorting to theft in order to be with GRUSINSKAYA.

THERE is also a somewhat funny bit about how all the elevator operators in the hotel are one-armed WWI veterans.

I'd really recommend this book (it's still in print and I ordered it off of amazon)- it's like finding a secret passage in a house you thought you knew every inch of.

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Pulp Fiction Poster

Pulp Fiction (1994) Starz On Demand 8/10

Several criminals have intersecting stories.

A rewatch for me, first in many years. I saw this on first release and was very impressed. I still think it's excellent, maybe not one of the greatest of all time though. Tarantino's pop culture references and dark humor still work very well. My favorite sequence has now become the Jack Rabbit Slim restaurant scene. Hitman John Travolta is told by his boss to look after his wife Uma Thurman. The set is fantastic in this scene where you get a bloody steak or burger with a $5 milk shake, wait staff that look like Buddy Holly and Marilyn Monroe, a maitre d that looks like Ed Sullivan and a twist contest. I also liked the dialogue where Travolta explains that one waitress is Marilyn Monroe and the other is Mamie Van Doren. The infamous sequence with bocer Bruce Willis and boss gangster Ving Rhames is still shocking and disturbing. The later scenes with Harvey Keitel were less interesting to me now but it is still a great film.

 

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THE 7TH VOYAGE OF SINBAD (1958) and MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (1961) 

They both have significant plot holes, silly moments, and predictable sequences.  Nonetheless, I enjoyed revisiting these last night on TCM, and MYSTERIOUS ISLAND has a fantastic score by BERNARD HERRMANN.   I loved these movies as a kid (bein' a Monster Kid, particularly 7th Voyage - such cool monsters). 

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3 hours ago, Allhallowsday said:

THE 7TH VOYAGE OF SINBAD (1958) and MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (1961) 

They both have significant plot holes, silly moments, and predictable sequences.  Nonetheless, I enjoyed revisiting these last night on TCM, and MYSTERIOUS ISLAND has a fantastic score by BERNARD HERRMANN.   I loved these movies as a kid (bein' a Monster Kid, particularly 7th Voyage - such cool monsters). 

And (as the risk of SPOILERS) just think what Disney could have done with Herbert Lom as Captain Nemo....

large_mysterious_island_blu-ray_6x.jpg

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BEFORE SUNRISE (1995) *Score: 3/5* 

Ethan Hawke and Julie Delpy both gave fine performances in this but I wasn't overly impressed; probably not the typical sort of movie that I enjoy watching. I am glad to have finally watched this, though. And, as I am a completionist, I will be watching the other two in the trilogy as well at some point. 

SICARIO (2015)  *Score: 3.5/5* 

I'm not sure if I paid as much attention as I should have during this one, but I thought it was pretty solid. Emily Blunt was good, as was Josh Brolin. 

THE KING OF COMEDY (1982) *Score: 3.5/5* 

This is one of the few Scorsese movies I've actually seen, but i certainly enjoyed it more than Taxi Driver... Although, De Niro's character quickly made it to the top of my "characters I would engage in violent activities with" list. One thing I noticed is how relevant this movie could be to our culture today, what with celebrity worship and all.  

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I'd like to thank the people who mentioned Arthur Hailey's The Moneychangers (1976) in connection with the recent Jean Peters tribute. This four-part mini-series was available on ebay for six dollars, an excellent price for an entertaining show with a cast mostly drawn from the movies. As bank president Leonardo Cimino is near death, he turns the bank over to an interim caretaker (Ralph Bellamy) while Kirk Douglas and Christopher Plummer vie to succeed him. It was good to see Marisa Pavan as Kirk's wife, though all she gets to do is be crazy and catatonic at an institution run by the kindly psychiatrist Helen Hayes. Meanwhile, Kirk is having a torrid affair with left-wing lawyer Susan Flannery, who wants the bank to fund a housing project in a slummy area. That probably seemed more progressive in 1976 than it does now. Plummer is married to upper-crust Jean Peters (who has a very nice last scene with Plummer), and the failings of the marriage leave him vulnerable to the charms of Joan Collins, who goes after him on the orders of mega-rich wheeler-dealer Lorne Greene, gleeful at hanging out in the Bahamas with beautiful young women instead of with the cattle on the Ponderosa.

And then there's Anne Baxter as the manager of the main branch of the bank; Hayden Rorke, an absolute delight as her financial expert husband; Percy Rodrigues as the bank's hard-nosed head of security; Lincoln Kilpatrick as a militant but reasonable black leader, and hey, that's Marla Gibbs as his wife; Burt Mustin as an old man who wants to take his money out of the bank; and Amy Levitt as a Puerto Rican teller. Timothy Bottoms has never looked cuter, rocking the 1970s curly hair and mustache look, and no wonder the scummy guys in prison are so enthusiastic to see him. I wouldn't have expected a 1976 TV production to be as explicit about what happens. And if you've always wanted to see Robert Loggia in brightly-colored speedo-sized briefs, this is your chance! And I wish James Shigeta had more screen time as electronics whiz Wizard Wong. He shows a great flair for comedy, and I wish we'd had more opportunities to see this aspect of his talent. Oh, and Patrick O'Neal has an absolutely over-the-top meltdown scene.

Amy Levitt is billed as "Amy Tevill," possibly because "Levitt" doesn't exactly sound Puerto Rican. Oddly, imdb doesn't pick this up, as they usually do. She is best known for being in the original cast of The Effect of Gamma Rays on Man-in-the-Moon Marigolds and for playing Cathy Craig on One Life to Life, doing the same "given LSD by evil guy and then killing the guy in self-defense but forgetting it because she's on LSD" story that Another World had used a few years earlier. She played a teller in Dog Day Afternoon and her credits per imdb stop in 1981 with no bio. Another soap opera connection: Susan Flannery had left her role of Dr. Laura Horton on Days to try her luck with the big screen, winning a Golden Globe as Best Newcomer for The Towering Inferno, and that probably helped her get the top female role here. She would then go back to daytime with the role of Stephanie Forrester on The Bold and the Beautiful that William Bell had written for her.

 

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Hopscotch (1980)

I’ve been watching a good handful of films from this era recently. I noted in my previous post that I usually don’t care for this period of film, but a few interesting films have popped up over the past handful of months; Atlantic City, Hardcore, and Hopscotch. Atlantic City Hardcore Hopscotch would be a good name for something. I’m not sure what that something is, but it’s a good name. Anyway, as far as I know, this was my introduction to Walter Matthau. It’s not an over-the-top Peter Sellers-style performance, but it’s an amusing performance in this spy comedy, which is how I would describe the entire film; amusing. The plot is absurd, comedy is found throughout, and it’s not a difficult film to follow. I found myself wanting to know what was going to happen next, which I can’t say about every film I watch. The only thing I dislike is Ned Beatty. He fits his role perfectly, but I can’t stand him as an actor. 

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7 hours ago, kingrat said:

Burt Mustin as an old man

I've tried finding pictures of Mustin as a young man to no avail.

2 hours ago, YourManGodfrey said:

Hopscotch (1980)

Thanks for the review. I'm just discovering movies from the 70's-80's, since I was too much a wild child to watch movies at the time. My remember my Mom loved HOPSCOTCH when she saw it in a theater and always wanted to see it. Skipped the TCM broadcast finding the library has a copy.

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9 hours ago, kingrat said:

I'd like to thank the people who mentioned Arthur Hailey's The Moneychangers (1976) in connection with the recent Jean Peters tribute.

 

Big cast for sure in an entertaining "high finance" soaper, kingrat. But I have to say that I thought Christopher Plummer stole the show, if only for his final scene in the four parter.

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2 hours ago, TomJH said:

Big cast for sure in an entertaining "high finance" soaper, kingrat. But I have to say that I thought Christopher Plummer stole the show, if only for his final scene in the four parter.

Christopher Plummer did win an Emmy for The Moneychangers. Without giving away too much, I'll say that his character does get to display a variety of emotions. By the way, The Moneychangers is a Ross Hunter production, and this is his kind of show.

Seeing Jean Peters and Marisa Pavan just reminds me that it's unfortunate they did not have bigger careers.

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Last night, I watched the ending of The Whole Nine Yards.  Not a great movie, but not depressing (and totally unbelievable).  Then, after watching Chopped, started watching an Ashley Judd, Greg Kinear, Ellen Barkin and Hugh Jackman movie (can't think of the name).  Another predictable movie with Jackman as the bad guy who is really good and Kinear as a "jerk."

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5 hours ago, TikiSoo said:

Thanks for the review. I'm just discovering movies from the 70's-80's, since I was too much a wild child to watch movies at the time. My remember my Mom loved HOPSCOTCH when she saw it in a theater and always wanted to see it. Skipped the TCM broadcast finding the library has a copy.

Hopscotch is on TCM onDemand until July 6th if you use that. 

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On 6/30/2020 at 8:46 AM, LornaHansonForbes said:

SO, THIS IS MORE ABOUT SOMETHING THAT I JUST READ, BUT SINCE IT APPLIES TO ONE OF THE MOST FAMOUS CLASSIC MOVIES, AND ONE OFTEN DISCUSSED HERE, FIGURED I'D POST THIS IN THIS THREAD:

I just read GRAND HOTEL by VICKI BAUM, and was very impressed by it- I have to say that the makers of the movie really missed out on the tone and nuance of the book, although (understandably) some of the details would never have been allowed to have made it to the screen even in the days before the Hayes Code.  You get even more of a sense of interconnection and fate between the collected characters.

differences between the film and the novel: (SPOILERS)

Grusinskaya- aka The GARBO character- only appears in the first 1/3 of the book, then she checks out (with the understanding she and HERR BARON will reunite in Tremezzo at her Villa.) She is written as MIDDLE AGED and even has AN 8 YEAR OLD GRANDSON! She is a fascinating character study- it's ironic to me that GARBO (allegedly) felt she was too old to play a prima ballerina, because the whole crux of her character is that she is at the edge of a mid-life crisis. She and the Baron also sleep with each other after he is caught breaking into her room.

Herr Baron Felix Von Gaigern- ( THE JOHN BARRYMOORE CHARACTER) Is written as a handsome YOUNG MAN- in his twenties, a veteran of WWI who was, in fact, saved by the DOCTOR CHARACTER (played by LEWIS STONE in the film) after being injured on the battlefield and is thusly convinced by the doctor to return the wallet he steals from KREINGELEIN (the Lionel Barrymoore character)

Kringelein- (aka The LIONEL BARRYMOORE character) is MUCH LESS ANNOYING IN THE BOOK, in fact- one could argue he is the DE FACTO HERO of the tale who appears in the entire tale and is the link between all the characters. Most shocking is the fact that, after the Baron is murdered by the businessman PREYSING, FLAMMCHIEN (the Crawford character) runs naked and screaming down the halls and into his arms where they make love to one another (!!!!) BEFORE CALLING THE POLICE.  His victory over the Preysing character is a lot more impactful in the book as he also enjoys toying with PREYSING before calling the cops on him.

Flaemchien (the CRAWFORD character) is only 19 and there is a scene where she and PREYSING have sex before he catches THE BARON in his room and kills him. she is a bit more complicated than she is in the movie, and you get the sense that this is maybe the character with which the author sympathized with and understood the most.

Preysing (the WALLACE BEERY character) is actually not as awful as he is in the movie, in fact it is worth noting that THE BARON lies to him and tells him that he is holding a gun on him before Preysing beats him to death, which even the author admits introduces the idea that it was a justifiable homicide (nonetheless, he is ruined and goes to prison.)

Dr Otto- The LEWIS STONE character is a WWI field surgeon who had half his face blown off by a shell in the war. he is a MORPHINE ADDICT and has a much greater presence in the novel- although the film does copy his closing monologue almost word for word.

there is also a character of a BELLHOP who finds a GOLD CIGARETTE CASE of THE BARON'S and agonizes over returning it to him because he is in love with a girl he wants to give it to, which quite intriguingly parallel's THE BARON'S resorting to theft in order to be with GRUSINSKAYA.

THERE is also a somewhat funny bit about how all the elevator operators in the hotel are one-armed WWI veterans.

I'd really recommend this book (it's still in print and I ordered it off of amazon)- it's like finding a secret passage in a house you thought you knew every inch of.

I've mentioned before on a different thread on Cyd Charisse that I saw the musical version of Grand Hotel in the 90s, which I really enjoyed.  In that version, Grusinskaya was an older woman and the Baron was a younger man.  Preysing is on the verge of having non-consensual sex with Flaemchien when the Baron breaks in on them, and she is pleading for the Baron's help.  The Baron is then shot by Preysig.  The character of Krigelein is clearly the closest to the hero of the story, and his song is later echoed by that of the Bellhop at the end of the play.  Anyway, the stage version sounds much closer to the original novel.  BTW, in the broadway version, Jane Krakowski had her debut as Flaemchien.

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I just saw Silver River (1948) for the first time.  An interesting performance by Flynn as an anti-hero, and the film is a bit of a mess, but a delicious one, kind of like when you have the leftover corned beef (or better yet, ham) and potatoes and fry it up with some eggs and sauce.   Raoul Walsh directed, with Thomas Mitchell in an excellent supporting role.  According to Alicia Malone and other sources, both Flynn and Sheridan were "in their cups" throughout the film.  Flynn doesn't show it, but I think Sheridan does.  At times, she seems to be "mailing it in," and her make-up is much heavier than I've seen on her in comparison to other movies.  I think the film is worth it just to see Flynn in an array of fancy waistcoats swinging his gambler's cane.

I tried to watch One More Tomorrow, but couldn't stay up any later.  I had seen the first version, The Animal Kingdom, and the scene stealing Jack Carson is definitely superior to William Gargan in the previous version.  Alexis Smith is stunning in an array of white gowns and one black negligee.  Annie is more of a down-to-earth gal.

 

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3 minutes ago, rosebette said:

I just saw Silver River (1948) for the first time.  An interesting performance by Flynn as an anti-hero, and the film is a bit of a mess, but a delicious one, kind of like when you have the leftover corned beef (or better yet, ham) and potatoes and fry it up with some eggs and sauce.   Raoul Walsh directed, with Thomas Mitchell in an excellent supporting role.  According to Alicia Malone and other sources, both Flynn and Sheridan were "in their cups" throughout the film.  Flynn doesn't show it, but I think Sheridan does.  At times, she seems to be "mailing it in," and her make-up is much heavier than I've seen on her in comparison to other movies.  I think the film is worth it just to see Flynn in an array of fancy waistcoats swinging his gambler's cane.

ALEX TREBEK : "Good!" 

I love all three of them, but ERROL FLYNN and THOMAS MITCHELL are the reasons to look at that. 

 

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8 minutes ago, rosebette said:

I just saw Silver River (1948) for the first time.  An interesting performance by Flynn as an anti-hero, and the film is a bit of a mess, but a delicious one, kind of like when you have the leftover corned beef (or better yet, ham) and potatoes and fry it up with some eggs and sauce.   Raoul Walsh directed, with Thomas Mitchell in an excellent supporting role.  According to Alicia Malone and other sources, both Flynn and Sheridan were "in their cups" throughout the film.  Flynn doesn't show it, but I think Sheridan does.  At times, she seems to be "mailing it in," and her make-up is much heavier than I've seen on her in comparison to other movies.  I think the film is worth it just to see Flynn in an array of fancy waistcoats swinging his gambler's cane.

I tried to watch One More Tomorrow, but couldn't stay up any later.  I had seen the first version, The Animal Kingdom, and the scene stealing Jack Carson is definitely superior to William Gargan in the previous version.  Alexis Smith is stunning in an array of white gowns and one black negligee.  Annie is more of a down-to-earth gal.

 

Saw both films for the first time last night.     I have a very similar view of Silver River.    As for Sheridan;  she was "mailing it in"  (should we say"tweeting it in" now???) on both films.

As Malone noted this was Sheridan's last film for Warner Bros,  and it looks like she couldn't get out of there fast enough (despite the fact she liked working with Flynn).

I posted my 'review' of One More Tomorrow in the Sheridan Star of the Month thread;   her screen persona just wasn't utilized in this film, while Smith's was.    In fact this is one of the best performances and roles I have seen from Smith (she does nasty,  all-about-me,   very good in a lot of films,  but this one is now the topper).      Oh,  and yea,  Smith never looked better.    

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