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26 minutes ago, rosebette said:

I've mentioned before on a different thread on Cyd Charisse that I saw the musical version of Grand Hotel in the 90s, which I really enjoyed.  In that version, Grusinskaya was an older woman and the Baron was a younger man.  Preysing is on the verge of having non-consensual sex with Flaemchien when the Baron breaks in on them, and she is pleading for the Baron's help.  The Baron is then shot by Preysig.  The character of Krigelein is clearly the closest to the hero of the story, and his song is later echoed by that of the Bellhop at the end of the play.  Anyway, the stage version sounds much closer to the original novel.  BTW, in the broadway version, Jane Krakowski had her debut as Flaemchien.

Oh WOW! I bet that was something to see! 
(thanks for the FYI)

ps- Apologies for mangling all the various Germanic names in my original post.

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8 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

Oh WOW! I bet that was something to see! 
(thanks for the FYI)

ps- Apologies for mangling all the various Germanic names in my original post.

Charisse was still beautiful, what a figure!  Her role is smaller than Garbo's, I would say. Krakowski wasn't in the version I saw, but she's on the original cast recording.

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12 minutes ago, rosebette said:

Charisse was still beautiful, what a figure!  Her role is smaller than Garbo's, I would say. Krakowski wasn't in the version I saw, but she's on the original cast recording.

It’s interesting to me that they amended the story [for BROADWAY] to make PREYSING’s “seduction” of FLAEM(I can’t spell that for the life of me) a r a p e, Because in the novel it is – believe it or not – or rather tender, if awkward, scene And she willingly engages in the act (As she does the notion of it in the 1932 film). 
In thinking about it though, VICKI BAUM Is the rare author who obviously had a tremendous amount of sympathy for *all* the characters in the book, again even PREYSING. I read that she was a chambermaid in a hotel for a time and that was how she got a lot of her material, she seems to have been a very understanding woman.

There is something a trifle film noir about the ending to the book though, at the end of the day everyone is really just trying to survive In Germany between the wars.

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Ps- Really the only issue I had with the novel GRAND HOTEL Was that right at the halfway mark the author goes into a ridiculous amount of detail about the business meeting between PREYSING And the rival company – its the exact same story as in the movie but wisely it’s about two minutes worth of time in the film- She clearly knows a lot about business, but she kills about 20 to 25 pages of the book and just brings the plot to a screeching halt.

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The Tartars (1961).

In this European co-production, Victor Mature wears a ridiculously skimpy outfit:

victor-mature-dressed-as-a-viking-togeth

to fight corpulent Orson Welles, who is clearly here for the paycheck so that he can fund whatever project he was working on (either The Trial or Chimes at Midnight, I'd guess).  Actually, the fight is over whether or not Mature will attack the Slavs, and involves Welles' niece and Mature's wife, who manages to wear the most spectacular medieval bra:

tartar.jpg

5/10

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Larceny (1948)

Larceny_1948_film_poster.jpeg

"Believe it or not Shelly Winters actually looked pretty hot in this, but again, by the end, I couldn't wait for her to die." 

Directed by George Sherman. 
Sherman was responsible for The Sleeping City and The Raging Tide two very decent Richard Conte Noir that could use restorations.
Larceny was written by Herb Margolis, Lou Morheim, William Bowers for screenplay based on the novel The Velvet Fleece by Lois Eby and John Fleming.
Cinematography was by Irving Glassberg. Music was by Leith Stevens.


The film stars John Payne as Rick Maxon, Joan Caulfield as Deborah Owens Clark, Dan Duryea as Silky Randall, Shelley Winters as Tory, and Dorothy Hart as Madeline. The rest of the cast includes Richard Rober as Max, Dan O'Herlihy as Duke, Nicholas Joy as Walter Vanderline, Percy Helton as Charlie Jordan, Walter Greaza as Mr. Owens, Patricia Alphin as Waitress, Harry Antrim as Mr. McNulty, Russ Conway as Detective, Paul Brinegar ("Wishbone" from Rawhide - TV Series) as the Mechanic, and Don Wilson as Master of Ceremonies.

A big time confidence operation goes off the rails when Maxon (Payne) falls for for the net mark two timing  Tory (Winters) in the process. 


The film is quite entertaining and its always great to see Percy Helton in another Noir. Needs a good restoration. As is a 6.5-7/10. Full review with  screencaps in film noir/gangster pages.

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Cry Terror (1958) New York City Tail Fin Noir

Poster%2BCry%2BTerror%2Bfi.jpg
 
"A nice surprise, NYC realism, Inger Stevens in a performance I like, and a Tail Fin Noir too boot."

Let me explain. I've always stumbled upon Cry Terror in progress. Always too, with the scene in either the pent house apartment or the house. I never stuck around, feeling, now I know, correctly, that the film is best savored from the beginning. Those two scenes are not indicative of the whole film, far from it, There's quite a bit of excellent on location New York City cinematography and also some of Los Angeles South Main and East 4th Street, filling in for the Lower Manhattan money pickup at the bank sequence.

Directed and written by Andrew L. Stone.  Stone was born in Oakland, California he attended the  University of California and then joined the San Francisco Film Exchange. He worked for Paramount (1938-41), United Artists (1943-47) and MGM (1955-62). Wanting more artistic independence he set up his own production company in 1943. In 1950 he filmed Highway 301 (1950) a good taught Noir starring Steve Cochran followed by The Steel Trap (1952). Stone had a penchant for filming on location and this film deliverers it in style. Bravo.
 
The pace in unrelenting. The Stones ratchet up the tension quite masterfully. Small mistakes in judgement or driving dilemmas an turn innocent mistakes into life threatening situations. Like in all Noirs people make dumb decisions that could make things even worse.

The film is entertaining enough for me and the cast performs compellingly. There is some great New York City archival footage of one of the Manhattan tunnels, footage of the long gone West Side Highway and also some sequences in the PATH tubes. Screencaps from an online streamer 7/10  Full review with  screencaps in Film Noir Gangster pages.

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Série noire (1979) Paris Neo Noir

Jim Thompson - À la française

Poster%2BSerie%2BNoir.jpg

Créteil.

Sort of a Paris Staten Island. One of those forgotten suburbs. Juxtapose crumbling one hundred year old dumps with empty lots rimmed by Modernist glass boxes. A suburb in flux. Franck Poupart. A door to door traveling salesman. Franck fantasizes about being a hard boiled detective. He's parked his 69 Peugeot 504 beater in a wasteland awaiting dubious development. Its thundering. He wears a trench coat. He's sort of shadow boxing with unseen crooks and dancing with femme fatales.

Director Alain Corneau does a masterful job of transposing the Thompson-esue down and out milieu to France. Its a dark, dark, comedy continually spiraling downward into the abyss. Corneau deftly depicts this on screen in the last scene where after loosing everything Frank clutching Mona begins to spin around in a circle like water going down a drain to the sewer, nice touch!

"Every time Patrick Dewaere goes into one of his fantastic lies (which is just about every time he opens his mouth) I come close to busting a gut. The monologing is certainly the product of Georges Perec--I doubt Thompson was the source. Our English subtitles probably don't do it justice." (dave jenkins - SLWB)

Dewaere is fantastic. He tries to play it cool on the outside while obsessed and desperate on the inside while at the same time everything in his world is going to ****. Occasionally he gives away his frustrations tearing a room apart or smashing his head into a car hood. He is very compelling to watch. Bernard Blier as Staplin plays an equally convincing low life, a bottom feeding, slime ball working out of a dilapidated and empty storefront. He oozes that particular quality of being able to **** you sincerely with a smile while picking your pockets of everything you got. Its that special affinity of con artists, gypsies, and used car salesmen.

Marie Trintignant plays Mona as practically a mute. Is she stressed out?  Does she have PTSD? Maybe she just doesn't give that much of a **** about it. Whats it cost her 10 minutes at most? She is pretty nonchalant about it all. It's what she does to support her Aunt and herself.

Andreas Katsulas plays Tikides the moronic punch drunk boxer with a childlike mind. He adds or subtracts just enough in just the right places to convince you that he's dumber than a box of rocks. Myriam Boyer plays Jeanne and Jeanne Herviale plays La tante.

Cinematography was by Pierre-William Glenn. A fun film screencaps from Blu-ray courtesy of Film Movement Classics. 7/10. Full review with screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster pages.

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3 hours ago, rosebette said:

Krakowski wasn't in the version I saw, but she's on the original cast recording.

For some reason or another, the cast album of Grand hotel on CD was held up for two years after it debuted on Broadway. By the time it was ready to do the recording, one of the opening night cast members from 1989 had passed away, so a replacement filled in.

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Guilty Bystander (1950) Brooklyn Alkie Noir  


Poster%2BGuilty%2BBystander.jpg

The East River. The waterfront. The crummy edge of Brooklyn Heights, then, now part of trendy DUBMO.  Then, just a rundown dump. A woman drives up in a taxi. Georgia She pays the driver. He speeds off.

Georgia's standing in front of the "Riverview." Probably "Riversmell" would be equally appropriate.  Its a resident dive hotel with a convenient bar tucked into the corner. The lobby has mildew, potted plants, and a three legged derelict  The office back of the lobby desk has a smoky poker game. Georgia rings the desk bell. A matron, Smitty. steps up out of the game. She takes one look at Georgia, pegs her for a hooker, and tells her we're filled up. Georgia tells her shes looking for Max Thursday the house dick. She tells her the room.

Directed by Joseph Lerner. Written by Don Ettlinger and based on the novel by H. William Miller and Robert Allison Wade. Cinematography was by Russell Harlan (Gun Crazy (1950), Southside 1-1000 (1950), Ruby Gentry (1952),To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)) and Gerald Hirschfeld (Fail Safe (1964), The Incident (1967)). Music by Dimitri Tiomkin.

The original story in the novel all takes place in San Diego. Director Lerner, a native New Yorker, may have been the reason the  stories location  was moved to New York City. There are six Max Thursday novels in toto, Fatal Step, Uneasy Street, Calamity Fair, Murder Charge, and Shoot to Kill.

The film stars Zachary Scott as alcoholic ex cop Max Thursday. Faye Emerson as Georgia his ex wife. Mary Boland as Smitty the owner of the Riverview Hotel. Sam Levine as Captain Tonetti of the NYPD. J. Edward Bromberg as mobster/smuggler Varkas, Kay Medford as the hooker Angel. Jed Prouty as Dr. Elder, Harry Landers as Bert, Dennis Patrick (Dark Shadows he played Paul Stoddard and Jason McGuire) as Mace, Ray Julian as Johnny, Jesse White as the Masher, and John Marley as the bartender.

The copy I saw before this was atrocious. This print is quite the improvement. What was literally unwatchable is now a moody film with a depressingly gritty atmosphere. The bars are grungy, the hooker is convincingly sleazy, the subway chase is excitingly filmed. Its entertaining and features the Brooklyn East River waterfront and Red Hook.  7-8/10  Full review with more sreencaps at Noirsville. Full review with screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster Pages.

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7 hours ago, rosebette said:

I just saw Silver River (1948) for the first time.  An interesting performance by Flynn as an anti-hero, and the film is a bit of a mess, but a delicious one, kind of like when you have the leftover corned beef (or better yet, ham) and potatoes and fry it up with some eggs and sauce.   Raoul Walsh directed, with Thomas Mitchell in an excellent supporting role.  According to Alicia Malone and other sources, both Flynn and Sheridan were "in their cups" throughout the film.  Flynn doesn't show it, but I think Sheridan does.  At times, she seems to be "mailing it in," and her make-up is much heavier than I've seen on her in comparison to other movies.  I think the film is worth it just to see Flynn in an array of fancy waistcoats swinging his gambler's cane.

 

I think Silver River is one of Flynn's more interesting films with one of his best performances. The writing of the film falls apart at the end and the final 15 minutes feel rushed, like they were trying to wrap the film all up somehow, but the characterizations in this film, particularly Flynn's darker portrayal than usual, are strong. Particularly effective, I feel, is Flynn's scene is a bar in which he is confronted by Thomas Mitchell who gives him a David and Bathsheba lecture. Mitchell is ruffled in appearance and flamboyant, as opposed to the reserved Flynn who stands in elegant attire. The two contrasting actors bounce off one another admirably for a memorable scene.

Bur I can't agree with you, though, rosebette, that Sheridan's performance seems "mailed it"at times or that she seems to be in her cups. She and Flynn have a delicious sexual chemistry in this western. In fact, outside of Olivia, along with Alexis Smith, I think Ann was Flynn's best leading lady. Flynn clearly enjoys playing his role as a scoundrel in this film.

Best scene in the film for me occurs after Sheridan has walked out on Errol and his grand house is being torn apart by creditors taking all his possessions. Flynn is stoic as he walks about the place, uttering a physical threat once only when workmen are about to take down a giant portrait of his wife (Sheridan) hanging on the wall. Flynn's only friend (played by Tom D'Andrea) tries to console him, suggesting he try to reunite with his wife, then adding, "Of course, it's none of my business."

"That's right," a proud Flynn responds, "It's none of your business."

D'Andrea departs, leaving Flynn alone with only a few workmen. Then the actor and director Raoul Walsh have one of their most touching moments together in my opinion, beautifully conveying the emotional vulnerability of Errol's character. Flynn leans against a door jam, trying to act nonchalant as his possessions are taken away. He starts to leave a room, then stops, and, almost as if by irresistible impulse, finally looks up at the wall beside him. The camera pans up to where he is peering to see the portrait of Ann Sheridan.

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13 hours ago, cigarjoe said:

Série noire (1979) Paris Neo Noir

Jim Thompson - À la française

Poster%2BSerie%2BNoir.jpg

Créteil.

Sort of a Paris Staten Island. One of those forgotten suburbs. Juxtapose crumbling one hundred year old dumps with empty lots rimmed by Modernist glass boxes. A suburb in flux. Franck Poupart. A door to door traveling salesman. Franck fantasizes about being a hard boiled detective. He's parked his 69 Peugeot 504 beater in a wasteland awaiting dubious development. Its thundering. He wears a trench coat. He's sort of shadow boxing with unseen crooks and dancing with femme fatales.

Director Alain Corneau does a masterful job of transposing the Thompson-esue down and out milieu to France. Its a dark, dark, comedy continually spiraling downward into the abyss. Corneau deftly depicts this on screen in the last scene where after loosing everything Frank clutching Mona begins to spin around in a circle like water going down a drain to the sewer, nice touch!

"Every time Patrick Dewaere goes into one of his fantastic lies (which is just about every time he opens his mouth) I come close to busting a gut. The monologing is certainly the product of Georges Perec--I doubt Thompson was the source. Our English subtitles probably don't do it justice." (dave jenkins - SLWB)

Dewaere is fantastic. He tries to play it cool on the outside while obsessed and desperate on the inside while at the same time everything in his world is going to ****. Occasionally he gives away his frustrations tearing a room apart or smashing his head into a car hood. He is very compelling to watch. Bernard Blier as Staplin plays an equally convincing low life, a bottom feeding, slime ball working out of a dilapidated and empty storefront. He oozes that particular quality of being able to **** you sincerely with a smile while picking your pockets of everything you got. Its that special affinity of con artists, gypsies, and used car salesmen.

Marie Trintignant plays Mona as practically a mute. Is she stressed out?  Does she have PTSD? Maybe she just doesn't give that much of a **** about it. Whats it cost her 10 minutes at most? She is pretty nonchalant about it all. It's what she does to support her Aunt and herself.

Andreas Katsulas plays Tikides the moronic punch drunk boxer with a childlike mind. He adds or subtracts just enough in just the right places to convince you that he's dumber than a box of rocks. Myriam Boyer plays Jeanne and Jeanne Herviale plays La tante.

Cinematography was by Pierre-William Glenn. A fun film screencaps from Blu-ray courtesy of Film Movement Classics. 7/10. Full review with screencaps in Film Noir/Gangster pages.

(Sorry to quote your whole post unedited, I’m using my phone)

Is this an adaptation of A HELL OF A WOMAN Or just more of an homage to the works of Thompson?

I know what you mean when you mention “black comedy”- I’m a huge Thompson fan and have read almost everything he ever wrote, and there are a few of his books that I would genuinely label borderline black comedies (chief among them A HELL OF A WOMAN) 

I’m reading HEED THE THUNDER right now Which is one of his very very early novels- It doesn’t seem to be crime based thus far- and liking it quite a bit...

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6 minutes ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

(Sorry to quote your whole post unedited, I’m using my phone)

Is this an adaptation of A HELL OF A WOMAN Or just more of an homage to the works of Thompson?

I know what you mean when you mention “black comedy”- I’m a huge Thompson fan and have read almost everything he ever wrote, and there are a few of his books that I would genuinely label borderline black comedies (chief among them A HELL OF A WOMAN) 

I’m reading HEED THE THUNDER right now Which is one of his very very early novels- It doesn’t seem to be crime based thus far- and liking it quite a bit...

Yes its an adaptation of Hell Of A Woman. I've read quite a bit of Thompson also, don't think I've read HEED THE THUNDER yet. BTW I can't remember the title of it but its the novel set mostly with the main character working in an aircraft plant, did you read that one?  Well the reason I bring it up is because I just finished Chester Himes book that is almost a companion piece  to that one called IF HE HOLLERS LET HIM GO.

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51 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

Yes its an adaptation of Hell Of A Woman. I've read quite a bit of Thompson also, don't think I've read HEED THE THUNDER yet. BTW I can't remember the title of it but its the novel set mostly with the main character working in an aircraft plant, did you read that one?  Well the reason I bring it up is because I just finished Chester Himes book that is almost a companion piece  to that one called IF HE HOLLERS LET HIM GO.

Yes: NOW AND ON EARTH, which is (I think) his first published novel, semi-autobiographical and with no criminal elements. it's a meandering mess, nuthin real special...

My favorite authors of all time would be (in no order): THOMAS HARDY, DICKENS, GEORGE ELIOT, JANE AUSTEN, DASHIELL HAMMETT, RAYMOND CHANDLER and JIM THOMPSON- and out of those 7- the only one who has any NOTABLE disparity in the quality of their work is THOMPSON- bless his heart, he had a real SCUD missile-like output, he has written some of the absolute best novels I have ever read in my life (THE GRIFTERS, THE KILLER INSIDE ME, and THE TRANSGRESSORS- the last of which I liked so much I started adapting it into a screenplay) and some of the most disappointing/outright WORST i've ever read (to be fair, some of his manuscripts have been reprinted posthumously and I think THOMPSON himself would be peeved they are seeing the light of day-  KING BLOOD and THE ALCOHOLICS among them.) I will also note that THE GETAWAY starts out AWESOME and then goes totally off the rails.

WILD TOWN, POP 1280, SOUTH OF HEAVEN (another borderline comedy) and A HELL OF A WOMAN are all terrific as well.

he uses a lot of similar plot outlines/character names too (Bellhops in hotels, traveling salesmen, crooked Sheriffs, Oklahoma and the name DILLON) so it's easy to sometimes stop and say "wait, have I read this before?"

HEED THE THUNDER (thus far) is a STEINBECKIAN saga of a messed up NEBRASKA family; I'll let you know what i think when I'm done with it,)

After this, I think BAD BOY and THE GOLDEN GIZMO (which going by the reviews on amazon is one for the "bad" column) will be the last two I have yet to read.

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I managed to snag a copy of This World Then The Fireworks a collection of Thompson with some pretty good short stories including the title piece which made a pretty bizarre film.

 

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13 minutes ago, cigarjoe said:

I managed to snag a copy of This World Then The Fireworks a collection of Thompson with some pretty good short stories including the title piece which made a pretty bizarre film.

 

I've never heard of that one!

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1 hour ago, LornaHansonForbes said:

I've never heard of that one!

This World, Then the Fireworks Poster

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IT ALWAYS RAINS ON SUNDAY 1947 by Roger Hamer  with Googie Withers.Excellent drama about an escaped convict  going back to see his former fiancée after many years,you root for the 2 protagonists,very good film,good cast.No violence.From Ealing Studios. 7/10

sunday.jpg

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On 7/1/2020 at 5:02 PM, cigarjoe said:

Poster%2BCry%2BTerror%2Bfi.jpg

I liked this one a lot. The cast is great. It was a bit jarring to see Jack Klugman as a knife wielding thug. Neville Brand has one of his scariest roles as a potential rapist. I liked the scene of Inger Stevens narrating her ordeal as she is forced to pick up the extortion money.

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I’m a sucker for BRITISH HORROR ANTHOLOGIES and I just checked out FROM BEYOND THE GRAVE, the final AMICUS anthology film, And one based on the writings of R Chetwynd Hayes, Of whom I am definitely a fan. 
PETER CUSHING (With a Pair of bushy fake eyebrows) stars as a sinister antique dealer (He’s not given much to do until his final scene) Who sells cursed items to four different patrons.

As is usually the case, the stories vacillate in quality and interest, sadly the final tale with Ian Ogilvy (who I ADORE, And who for some odd reason did not get top billing although he was definitely an established star at the time)was the weakest. The second story which starred Donald Pleasence and his eerily look-alike (real life) daughter ANGELA was the most effective And had the best ending.

The third story would have been the best had the ending been a little bit better, but it featured an absolutely hilarious, WONDERFUL Performance by Margaret Leighton as a dizzy medium straight out of Noel Coward. I don’t think anyone told her that this was just a little low budget British horror anthology, because she brings Academy award level A-game to it.

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I just watched Gold is Where You Find It (1937).  The technicolor was beautiful and the outdoor photography and special effects were stunning.  I found it an interesting story (apparently partly based on true incidents), pitting the mines' destruction of the environment against the ranchers' concerns for the land and their crops.  Michael Curtiz directs this one briskly, and Olivia gives an engaging performance, initially girlish, but emerging as the moral center of the film (along with Claude Rains, who with her and the landscapes and flood scenes, pretty much steals the picture).    I wish the lead was someone else (maybe Errol Flynn -- then we'd get some fireworks!) -- a Henry Fonda type, Jimmy Stewart, really anyone other than George Brent with the lacquered hair who, frankly, looks old enough to be Olivia's father.  Some nice catty support by Margaret Lindsay in an array of striking gowns.  I've never seen her in a technicolor film.

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23 minutes ago, rosebette said:

I just watched Gold is Where You Find It (1937).  The technicolor was beautiful and the outdoor photography and special effects were stunning.  I found it an interesting story (apparently partly based on true incidents), pitting the mines' destruction of the environment against the ranchers' concerns for the land and their crops.  Michael Curtiz directs this one briskly, and Olivia gives an engaging performance, initially girlish, but emerging as the moral center of the film (along with Claude Rains, who with her and the landscapes and flood scenes, pretty much steals the picture).    I wish the lead was someone else (maybe Errol Flynn -- then we'd get some fireworks!) -- a Henry Fonda type, Jimmy Stewart, really anyone other than George Brent with the lacquered hair who, frankly, looks old enough to be Olivia's father.  Some nice catty support by Margaret Lindsay in an array of striking gowns.  I've never seen her in a technicolor film.

Like you note,  this is a well made product of the Warner Bros. studio system and their under-contract staff of director Curitz,  lead actors like Rains and DeHavilland,  supporting actors like John Litel, Barton MacLane,  Henry O'Neil and Harry Davenport,    composer Max Steiner, and cinematographer Sol Polito.    All in brilliant Technicolor.

I agree that a slightly younger actor in place of George Brent would have been better suited for the role,  but other than Flynn,  WB didn't have under-contract any other leading-men, that would have been suitable for the role,  available:  (I think we can agree Cagney, Raft or E.G. Robinson wouldn't have worked).  

Jack hated having to pay another studio for a loan-outs or trading-stars,   and that is what he would have had to do to get Fonda,  Stewart or another more suitable actor from another studio.    The studio was already spending a lot to make the film in Technicolor with the "A" unit,  thus we get Brent.

PS:  This was clearly Brent's largest leading role in 1938.    His supporting-actor performance in Jezebel  was one of his best for the studio.   Oh, and Jack already had to pay to get Fonda for that film. 

 

       

 

 

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On 7/1/2020 at 5:33 AM, YourManGodfrey said:

Hopscotch (1980)

I’ve been watching a good handful of films from this era recently. I noted in my previous post that I usually don’t care for this period of film, but a few interesting films have popped up over the past handful of months; Atlantic City, Hardcore, and Hopscotch. Atlantic City Hardcore Hopscotch would be a good name for something. I’m not sure what that something is, but it’s a good name. Anyway, as far as I know, this was my introduction to Walter Matthau. It’s not an over-the-top Peter Sellers-style performance, but it’s an amusing performance in this spy comedy, which is how I would describe the entire film; amusing. The plot is absurd, comedy is found throughout, and it’s not a difficult film to follow. I found myself wanting to know what was going to happen next, which I can’t say about every film I watch. The only thing I dislike is Ned Beatty. He fits his role perfectly, but I can’t stand him as an actor. 

 

On 7/1/2020 at 8:21 AM, TikiSoo said:

I've tried finding pictures of Mustin as a young man to no avail.

Thanks for the review. I'm just discovering movies from the 70's-80's, since I was too much a wild child to watch movies at the time. My remember my Mom loved HOPSCOTCH when she saw it in a theater and always wanted to see it. Skipped the TCM broadcast finding the library has a copy.

I remember Hopscoth warmly. I only saw it once, but it was a playful, fun film  and Walter Matthau was wonderful. Plus Glenda Jackson was fun in her smaller part as Matthau's immorata. Regarding Ned Beatty, the character really was something else. I remember that the film decided to make a sly comment by making Beatty's character, the villain,  the only one in the film to use strong swear words, and indeed he is the only reason for the film's R rating.

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On 6/26/2020 at 4:07 PM, Det Jim McLeod said:

Holiday in Spain Poster

Scent Of Mystery aka Holiday In Spain (1960) TCM 4/10

An English photographer (Denholm Elliott) uncovers a murder plot while vacationing in Spain.

I saw this because I am a big Peter Lorre fan and wanted to add this to my list of his films that I have seen. It was pretty bad, Lorre does appear in most of the scenes but merely drives Elliott around and has a few quips here and there. Mike Todd Jr produced and seems to want to do a smaller scale version of his late father's Around The World In Eighty Days. The color and scenery are beautiful but the script is ridiculous. However it is almost worth it to see the surprise cameo at the end. 

Yeah, just finished it up today, and its very blase, even though Spain looks like a treat in it. Nifty end credits though, and the curved screen gives it some novelty value. Still, I needed to dip back into the classic era after three straight up experiments with 2019 cinema, so it served its purpose.

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32 minutes ago, CinemaInternational said:

Yeah, just finished it up today, and its very blase, even though Spain looks like a treat in it. Nifty end credits though, and the curved screen gives it some novelty value. Still, I needed to dip back into the classic era after three straight up experiments with 2019 cinema, so it served its purpose.

As you can see from the poster, under its "Scent of Mystery" title, it was not only faux-Cinerama, but also "The first picture in Smell-O-Vision", with clues heightened by aromas pumped in through the theater air conditioning.  (No, not "Scratch & sniff", John Waters came up with that later.)

Nice idea, but eh, it'll never replace television.  It'll never work.

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